(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "School catalog, 1977-1978"

Philadelphia College of Art 



PCA Catalog 



PCA's Second Century 

Space Planning 

Philadelphia 

Gallery 

Guest Lecturer Programs 

Educational Program 

Curriculum 
Foundation Program 
Crafts 

Environmental Design 
Graphic Design 
Illustration 
Industrial Design 
Painting and Drawing 
Photography and Film 
Printmal<ing 
Sculpture 
Education 
Related Arts 
Liberal Arts 
Art Therapy 
Cooperative and Exchange Programs 

Union of Independent Colleges of Art 

Pennsylvania Academy/PCA Cooperative Program 

East Coast Art College's Exchange Program 

Foreign and Summer Study Programs 
Lifelong Education 

Evening Division 

Saturday School 

Pre-College Program 
Scholarships and Commencement Prizes 









Admissions Bulletin 
Curricular Catalog 
Information 



Cover Design: Seat tops by (from left to right) Douglas Kratz, 
John Greene, Patricia Zander, Robert Kehl and 
Kathleen Ziegler, sophomore industrial design majors. 

Problem: Design a minimal seat using fiberglass 
reinforced resin. 

Criteria: (1) that the seat be comfortable to the largest and 
smallest person in the class; (2) that the seat be designed 
for general use in the home and utilize the properties of 
reinforced resin optimally. 

Procedure: Conceptual sketches, mock ups and final form 
study to be developed in design class. Molds, master model 
and fiber glass shell to be produced in plaster workshops. 
Finishing and spraying to be done in materials and 
fabrication class. 

Teachers: William Daley, Harlan Glebe, Petras Vaskys, 
Julian Winston 












ri-ji-;* 




f0 77'V<< 




PCA's Second Century 

Diversity has been one of the hallmarks of the Phila- 
delphia College of Art since its founding with the 
Philadelphia Museum of Art in 1876. A century ago 
our students concentrated on clay modeling, drawing 
or painting. Today's students at PCA specialize in 
nine different areas that encompass the entire 
spectrum of crafts, design and fine arts. Comple- 
menting the major departments are extensive 
offerings in liberal arts and supplemental programs 
in art therapy and education. 

Flexibility is a second facet of the college's per- 
sonality. Our students enjoy a curriculum that allows 
them to take as many as one-third of their courses in 
areas other than their majors. We promote a free 
interchange of ideas and experiences by providing 
our students with 24 hour per day access to 
our facilities. 

Responsiveness is a third characteristic of our 
college. Throughout our history of growth, PCA has 
retained an uncommon degree of adaptability to 
changing conditions and needs. PCA was indeed 
founded because of an upsurge of interest in the arts 
generated by the Centennial Exposition held here in 
Philadelphia. Ever since then, the continuing 



expansion of our course of study and facilities has 
reflected new developments in the arts. 

Durability and discipline are two other qualities 
inherent in the college. PCA's commitment to a 
structured work environment in which faculty and 
students work closely together has sustained our 
academic progress over the span of a century. 
Because the PCA experience is especially intense, 
the results are most gratifying. 

Experimentation and individuality further personify 
PCA. Our low ratio of faculty to students allows for 
significant personal attention. Ingenuity and inven- 
tiveness are encouraged in the studios and shops. 
Self-awareness is stressed, and the students' self- 
confidence is actively advanced. 

A final major component in PCA's personality is 
our college's urbanity. Within walking distance of our 
door are Philadelphia's museums, galleries, theaters 
and concert halls. Lectures, special events and exhi- 
bitions held at the college and the activities within 
the surrounding city all contribute to the excitement 
and energy that characterize the Philadelphia 
College of Art. 



Space Planning 

Space and its use has always been an interesting 
challenge at PCA Traditionally, we have defined 
and redefined our instructional spaces as depart- 
ments grew or needs changed. This past year was no 
exception, for we moved the administration and nine 
of the college's eleven departments into the ARCO 
Building where architecturally viable space was 
suitable to our changing needs. More space than we 
had previously, more efficient space, and an oppor- 
tunity to try out new methods of sharing departmental 
equipment are some of the benefits. On the first floor 
we have a new gallery and a new supply and book 
store, both designed to serve PCA and the public. 

Redesigning our space to be coherent and effi- 
cient has posed the need to solve provoking prob- 
lems and to make fine distinctions. The success of 
this year's project has led us to not only start planning 
forthe appropriate use of the Haviland and Furness 
Building, but to plan the move of the two remaining 
instructional departments from their Broad and Pine 
Street site to the Broad and Spruce Street location 
as well. 

The college's shops and technical facilities now 
include a complete bronze casting foundry and weld- 
ing shop; facilities for working in plaster, plastics, 
wood, stone and terra cotta; photographic process- 
ing equipment and darkrooms; and other specialized 
equipment requisite to department offerings. 

While the library reflects the college's emphasis on 
the arts, more than half of the 36,000 volumes cur- 
rently held are in the humanities and sciences. The 
library subscribes to 270 periodicals and maintains 
back issues of important journals. There are also 
more than 100,000 indexed pictures, pamphlets and 
other ephemera; more than 300 mounted posters and 
fine reproductions, and a collection of 1000 circu- 
lating records and audio tapes. Over 120,000 slides 
and more than 800 feature and short films are avail- 
able through the PCA audio-visual centerand an 
affiliated private collection. 

PCA's relocation and renovation, when completed, 
will be as stimulating forthe college community as 
the larger public because a mural and park, designed 
by Herbert Bayer and donated by the Atlantic 
Richfield Company, will be situated between our 
old and new buildings and thus provide a 
cohesive campus. 

The Instructional Space Planning Committee 




Top: A juxtaposition of the avant garde and traditional: Claes 
Oldenburg's "Clothespin" adjacent to William Penn atop City Hall. 

The Philadelphia Museum of Art and Fairmount Park are seven 
bicycling minutes away from the College. 



Patricia Cruser 
Leslie Goestchius 
Gerald Greenfield 
Lois Johnson 
Richard Reinhardt 



Harry Soviak 
Richard Stetser 
Stephen Tarantal 
Julian Winston 
John Lawson — 
Mitchell/Giurgola Architects 



Philadelphia 

A city at first glance is huge, humming, intriguing, 
and awesome. But soon the whir slows down, you 
walk and look and talk and it begins to break up into 
touchable pieces. Street names begin to hold 
meaning; communities take shape. In Philadelphia, 
this process happens very quickly and easily. The 
city's streets are arranged in a comfortable grid 
system. City Hall is the center, at the crossing of 
Broad and Market Streets; Fifth Street is east of 
Broad, Twentieth is west. Walnut and Locust are 
south of Market, Vine and Race are north. Four blocks 
south of City Hall, at the corner of Broad and Spruce, 
is the Philadelphia College of Art. 

From this vantage point in 'Center City', the student 
of art and life is free to roam. Most of Philadelphia's 
sights and sounds are within walking distance, 
others are a short bus or bicycle ride away. 

You'll want to visit the Philadelphia Art Museum; 
a short ride on the 'A' Bus will find you there. The 
Philadelphia Orchestra, among the world's finest, 
plays in the acoustically perfect Academy of Music 
just north of the college. Walk to Independence Hall 
and Society Hill, where the old has been treasured 
and young people live in homes built two centuries 
ago. Ride a bicycle and explore some of the 7,000 
acres of greenery and recreational facilities that com- 
prise Fairmount Park, the largest municipal park in 
the world. Visit other colleges and universities, such 
as the University of Pennsylvania, just across the 
Schuylkill River and buzzing with things to do, 
see, and learn. 

You'll want to explore Philadelphia's galleries for 
the fine arts and crafts, and the many small museums 
with theirspecialized collections of paintings, prints, 
sculpture, antiques, and historical objects. The 
galleries, museums, and excitement of New York City 
are an hour and a half away by train; the Amtrak can 
also take you to Washington, D.C. for a day of sight- 
seeing and gallery hopping. Trips to the Mercer 
Museum and the Moravian Potteries, the galleries of 
New Hope and Jenkintown, the Amish farms near Lan- 
caster, and other treasures are all weekend outings. 

Within blocks of the college are the major shopping 
areas: boutiques, department stores, five and tens, 
hardware stores, art supply stores, book and plant 
shops, craft shops, thrift shops. The old 'Antique Row' 
is on Pine Street. Outlet stores for furniture, pots and 
pans, rags, and gewgaws are down by the waterfront. 
Second-hand stores are plentiful in Germantown and 
West Philadelphia. The 'South Street Renaissance' is 
a gathering of new people trying new things: galleries 
and book stores, theaters and restaurants, street fairs 
and open houses. Groceries for healthy people 



abound, some of the best at the old open-air Italian 
Market with flour and oranges, spices and fish. 

Restaurent offerings range from gourmet French 
cuisine to great roast beef hoagies. South Philly is a 
haven for old-time Italian kitchens; Chinatown, 
sidewalk eateries, Indian food, soft pretzels, vege- 
tarian restaurants, ice cream stores — you'll find 
your favorites. 

Start to hear the hums and roars of the city. Sit on a 
bench in Rittenhouse Square; watch the Mummers' 
Day Parade. Visit a clothes line art exhibit or a craft 
market; join in on 'Super Sunday'. Crew races on the 
Schuylkill, outdoor concerts at Robin Hood Dell, lunch 
at Valley Green Inn, concerts at the Free Library, 
folk dancing on the Art Museum steps, leisurely 
walks through Morris Arboretum or Pennypack Park 
— all add to the essence of Philadelphia. 

And with it all, Philadelphia is a place to live. Its 
tree-lined streets paved with cobblestones, old town 
houses and new condominiums, parks and play- 
grounds make the city a place people call home. 
Neighborhoods take on a small town character with 
window boxes, mimosa trees peeking over back 
yard fences, brick sidewalks, neighbors sharing a 
cup of coffee, block parties and community action. 
Philadelphia is the fourth largest city in the country, 
but it is also a window in which to hang a spider plant, 
a friendly corner grocer, a rain-wet quiet street, a 
sculpture discovered in an alley-way, an opportunity 
to make a friend, and a good place in which to be 
an art student. 

Barbara Koester, 
Student 



The Gallery 

Philadelphia College of Art's gallery program features 
the work of distinguished contemporary artists in 
exhibitions that complement those of other Philadel- 
phia institutions and have attracted the attention 
and support of the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts 
and the National Endowment for the Arts. Themes, 
ideas and forms that concern today's artists are 
emphasized. 

In addition to the annual Alumni and Student Exhi- 
bitions, the gallery featured two exhibitions of artists' 
sketchbooks in 1976-77. Sketchbooks I: Philadelphia 
highlighted many artists teaching at PCA. Among 
them were Hans-Ulrich Allemann, Michael Lasuchin, 
Richard Reinhardt and Warren Rohrer. Private Nota- 
tions: Artists' Sketchbooks II drew artists such as 
Carl Andre, John Cage, Merce Cunningham, Red 
Grooms, Roy Lichtenstein, Louise Nevelson, Yvonne 
Rainer, Ad Reinhardt, George Segal, David Smith, 
Saul Steinberg and Tom Wesselmann who, when 
combined collectively, represent a larger geo- 
graphical area. 

Artists' Maps presented a variety of maps and 
charts used as tools, "ground" or armature for 
fantasy. Some of the artists in this show were Christo, 
Joseph Cornell, Rafael Ferrer, Jasper Johns, Claes 
Oldenburg, Robert Smithson and William Wiley. 
George Trakas built "Columnar Pass", an installation 
piece specifically designed for the gallery space and 
led daily informal discussions about his work. 7/me, 
an exhibition of work supplemented by a film and 
performance program, focused on the temporal 
component in recent art. Vito Acconci, Arman, Pol 
Bury, Scott Burton, Mollis Frampton, Al Jensen, 
Joseph Kosuth and Andy Warhol were among the 
artists participating. 

Exhibitions in 1977-1978 will include Sets and 
Costumes Designed by Artists. The Artists' Book: 
Early Twentieth Century, a color xerox exhibition, and 
Reflections — sculpture and paintings by Larry Bell, 
Roy Lichtenstein, Robert Morris and Lucas Samaras. 



The gallery is an active space in which an 
exchange of ideas among students, faculty and the 
director is encouraged. Artists and speakers from 
outside of the college community contribute to the 
ongoing dialogue. Each exhibition is accompanied 
by a catalogue, gallery talks, and lectures of films 
relating to the subject. In addition, there are concerts, 
film events, performance works and symposia. Often, 
artists are invited to do projects in the gallery. During 
installation, students assist the artists, thereby 
gaining a first-hand knowledge of their ideas 
and methods. 

Janet Kardon 
Director of Exhibitions 




A segment of the "Time" Exhibition in the Gallery. 




George Trakas takes time off from his mstallation of "Columnar 
Pass," a project tfiat fie constructed in the PCA Gallery, to 
discuss his work with students. 



Guest Lecturers 

Distinguished guest lecturers and visiting critics are 
an integral part of the college's calendar. Whether 
lecturing, participating in symposia orserving as 
members of juries pertaining to particular projects, 
these visitors add a welcome dimension to PCA's 
diversified faculty and curriculum. Theirspecial 
appearances and distinctive contributions are appre- 
ciated not only by the college community but by 
the larger public as well. 

Some of the notable guests who addressed the 
student body during the 1 976-77 academic year were: 
Vito Acconci, filmmaker: Dana Atchley, media artist- 
performer; Herbert Bayer, graphic designer and 
painter: Daniel Berrigan, poet and political activist; 
Louise Bourgeois, sculptor: Scott Burton, performer; 
Ken Carbone, graphic designer; Germane Celant, art 
historian: Joe Centuro, graphic designer; Jack 
Darner, printmaker; Bertrand Davezec, painter; 
Douglas Davis, video artist; Randall Enos, illustrator; 
Susan Fries, musician; Stephen Geissbuhler, graphic 
designer; Hans Ggli, architect; Joyce Kozloff, painter; 
Max Kozloff, critic; Richard Landry, musician; Dennis 
Leon, sculptor; Les Levine, sculptor; Katherine and 
Michael McCoy, graphic designers; Jonas Mekas, 
filmmaker; Karen Mikolas, glass craftsman; Ree 
Morton, sculptor; Louis Muller, metalsmither; Alice 
Neel, painter; Adebisi Owodunni, curator; Krishna 
Reddy, printmaker: Arnold Roth, cartoonist: Charles 
Santore, illustrator: Phil Simkin, printmaker: Marcia 
Tucker, curator; Gene Thornton, photography critic; 
Pierre Trombert, mime artist; Wolfgang Weingart, 
graphic designer. 




The 1976 Philadelphia homecoming of the late Alexander Calder 
was initiated and co-sponsored by the Philadelphia College of 
Art. Honored by the city and the artistic community, Calder 
toured PCA's studios and conversed with students about 
their work. 



Educational Program 



The Philadelphia College of Art presents a fascinating 
pastiche of ideas and opinions, of philosophies and 
concepts, of directions and disciplines, of fine arts, 
crafts, and design. PCA offers a carefully structured 
educational program designed to provide a thorough 
experience in the best of art and design studies, 
to maintain demanding standards of creative 
leadership, and to encourage students to develop 
and express innovative and experimental approaches 
to their work. 

The beginning is the Foundation Program, a core 
curriculum of studies in drawing, two- and three- 
dimensional design supplemented by electives and 
liberal arts. In the core curriculum, students 
investigate basic processes, concepts, information, 
and visual awareness applicable to all fields of 
art and design. Through the solution of problems and 
exploration of projects, visual vocabularies are 
improved and refined to meet the requirements of 
advanced studies. Electives in the foundation year 
give students the opportunity to explore areas of 
interest preparatory to selecting a major at the 
beginning of the second year. 

PCA offers nine studio majors. B.F.A. degrees are 
earned by students majoring in Crafts, Graphic 
Design, Illustration, Painting and Drawing, 
Photography and Film, Printmaking, and Sculpture. 
The Bachelor of Science degree is granted to 
graduates in Environmental Design and Industrial 
Design. Each department is unique, with its own 
requirements and curriculum, its own structure and 
theories. All studio areas expose students to the 
best in contemporary practice as well as the 
contributions of the past; each presents divergent 
concepts and modes, asking the students to develop 
individual philosophies. The uncommonly generous 
1:11 faculty to student ratio means that students 
have the closest possible individual attention and 
assistance throughout their course of study from 
the professional artists and designers who form 
the faculty. 

The college believes that all students should 
acquire a sound understanding of generic ideas of 
the past and of the present and an informed 
awareness of the humanistic values of all cultures. 
For this reason, fully one-third of the curriculum is 
required in liberal arts studies. A comprehensive 
array of courses in art history, literature, social 
studies, philosophy, and science is available. 



Students design their own curriculum through 
the selection of elective studio courses. Related arts 
can assist one in broadening an individual field of 
interest, investigating alternative materials and 
philosophies, and/or supplementing major programs 
with parallel studies. The Department of Education 
offers a teacher certification program which enables 
students to pursue courses toward the Pennsylvania 
Instructional I certificate concurrent with the major 
studio work. The art therapy concentration provides 
the academic foundation for students interested 
in careers as art therapists or for graduate study 
in this field. 

The college participates in the Commonwealth of 
Pennsylvania's Higher Education Equal Opportunity 
Act (Act 101). Under this aegis, PCA provides 
reading and writing workshops, studio tutoring, and 
a variety of counselling activities, both on the pre- 
freshman and undergraduate level. 

The Master of Arts in Art Education, offered by 
the Department of Education, provides graduate 
study in education and liberal arts coupled with 
advanced work in studio. 

In addition to the undergraduate and graduate 
curricula, PCA offers several opportunities for study 
at various levels through the Lifelong Education 
Program. The Evening Division courses allow 
independent, part-time study at varying professional 
levels. A Pre-College summer program is open to 
high school students considering a career in art 
and design. The Saturday School, for students aged 
eight to eighty, offers courses that investigate 
many areas of the studio disciplines. 





1 . Untitled 
10"x9" 

acrylic paint on illustration board 
Ponder Goembel 
Senior. Illustration 

2. Unglazed Footed Bowl 
12" diameter 

red clay .01 
Madison Maclaren 
Senior. Craft/Ceramics 

3. Untitled 
12"x17y4" 
color xerox collage 
Cindy Ettinger 
Junior, Printmaking 

4. Chair, laminated rocker 
39"high, 51" wide 
cherry with red fabric 
Porter Littlefield 
Junior, Craft/Wood 

5. Woven Rug 
43" X 70" 

linen warp and wool 
Mark Ellenberg 
Senior, Craft/Fibres 




i; 






6. Bracelet 
Z'h" 

bronze and plastic 
Stephanie Klavens 
Sophomore, Craft/Jewelry 

7. Untitled 
49" X 47" 

oil on canvas 

Lori E. Goodman 

Senior, Painting and Drawing 

8. In 1976-77 the Environmental 
Design Department designed and 
built its own environments 

for work, study, display and 
pleasure. Principle designers: 
J. Rofkind and Paul Rohsner 

9. Campbell's Soup 
17"x22" 

casein on illustration board 
Jeremiah Austin 
Junior, Graphic Design 




10 






11 



1 0. Marbles and Eggs, 
Marbles and Strings 
14"x14", 10" xU" 
paint on canvas 
Billie Harvey 

Graduate Student, Art Education 

1 1 . Ski, Boot, Pole and Accessory 
Carrier/ Security 

life size model 

Marna Foss 

Senior, Industrial Design 

12. Torso 
30" 

terra-cotta 
Elaina Johnson 
Sophomore, Sculpture 

1 3. Untitled 
6y4 " X 61/4 " 
color photograph 
Jonathan Snelling 

Senior, Photography and Film 











.il 



12 





13 



Foundation Program 



Robert McGovern, 
Michael Rossman, 
Co-Chairpeople 



All first year students participate in the Foundation 
Program, a year devoted to tine study of visual form, 
its execution and evaluation. The program enables 
the student to experience both the unique character 
and the interdependence of the two and three 
dimensional modes of working. Its scope challenges 
students to enlarge their interests and ascertain 
the potentials of untried materials and procedures. 

Two-dimensional design, three-dimensional 
design, and drawing form the required core of the 
program. Each discipline stresses precise observa- 
tion, sound worl< habits, and sensitivity to the 
materials and tools unique to its vocabulary. 
Projects are directed toward specific visual prob- 
lems and encourage logical experimentation with 
appropriate use of constraints. Students are urged 
to study and discuss traditional modes in order to 
understand the connection between their own 
discoveries and historic precedent. 

The studio core is supported by courses in liberal 
arts and by studio electives offered by the major 
departments. These electives are designed to 
acquaint students with standards, techniques, and 
practices of the major studio areas and to enable 
the student, with the help of an advisor, to choose a 
field of concentration at the end of the founda- 
tion year. 



■ 




m 




m 


'■./ v"/y 


1 """' ■ 


■ a B — ^ y 


^i' 


^iamBtim 




1. Cut Paper 

2. Toothpick Sculpture 

3. 3-D Models 

4. Pencil Drawing 

5. Pencil Drawing 

6. Book 

7. Charcoal Drawing 

8. Watercolor 



.. Cif 



14 



m '^n 




t^ 



A. 


m 


\ J^ 


^ 


^^^^^ 


H 


► ^f-'v. J ' 


4*.# /I 

i 





5^ 


iiC#| 




^^S 



15 



The Crafts department provides studio experience in 
tfie processes and materials of various crafts. 
Emphiasis is also placed on the investigation of 
ideas and possibilities through drawing and design. 

The department offers unified programs in four 
major areas: ceramics, fibers, metals, and wood. 
There are supplementary offerings in glass and 
plaster. Craft students are expected to acquire a 
comprehensive understanding of the innate prop- 
erties of these materials. This knowledge, when 
coupled with a full command of manipulative and 
technical sl<ills, helps develop personal mastery of 
materials and expression. 

Sophomores in the program are required to work 
in two craft areas, to investigate more than one 
possibility and expand their experience. While most 
students choose one concentration, combinations 
of craft areas can be pursued through the final two 
years of the major if the student has demonstrated 
ability to do successful work in two areas. 

The program is enhanced by visits to exhibitions, 
museums, and private collections. Frequent lectures 
by prominent and distinguished artists/craftsmen 
and women supplement the curriculum. Students are 
advised to study the History of 20th Century 
Crafts, which provides additional exposure to the 
background and philosophy of crafts. 

The study of crafts at PCA is particularly 
rewarding because of the extensive crafts resources 
and professional activity in the area. The Crafts 
department is committed to providing instruction by 
artist/craftsmen and women who are practicing 
professionals as well as teachers. 

The goal of the department is to develop artists/ 
craftsmen and women of individuality and imagina- 
tion with the resourcefulness to achieve the highest 
professional and creative level. 

Upon graduation, some students choose to 
continue studies elsewhere. Increasingly, however, 
more graduates work as independent artists 
operating private studio/shops, as teachers of 
crafts, or as consultants to industry and architects. 
In many cases, individuals combine these pursuits to 
meet either personal or particular needs and goals. 







16 






1. Meg Rodgers, senior 

2. Paul Cusack, senior 

3. Harold Roberts, senior 

4. Meg Rodgers, senior 

5. Bruce Anderson, junior 

6. Stephanie Klavens, sophomore 

7. Nancy Durant, junior 

8. Yvonne Kirk, senior 

9. Eileen Mallarex, senior 
10. Mildred Kelso, senior 






17 



Environmental Design 



Philadelphia is an excellent place to study environ- 
mental design. The city has a rich heritage of 
man-made and natural environments, comparable to 
few American cities. The people of the city and the 
professionals practicing in Philadelphia have made 
a commitment to the environment that has produced 
a national reputation. 

Environmental design is a rich mixture of the tradi- 
tional professions of interior design, architecture, city 
planning, and landscape architecture. The results of 
the environmental designer are large in visual scale 
and long-lasting; as such, the decisions of the 
designer must be careful, thoughtful, and of the 
highest public interest and intent. 

The major objective of the department is to teach 
a design process whereby data and needs are 
creatively transformed into physical form. The 
process is one that encourages imagination, 
responsibility, individuality, and personal commit- 
ment. There is a continuous effort in the department 
to achieve a balance between many forces, to balance 
skill activities with philosophy and thought processes, 
exploratory work with conventional design, specific 
subjects with overviews, hard work with enjoyment. 

The faculty is composed of eight active profes- 
sionals from the fields of interior design, environ- 
mental psychology, architecture, landscape 
architecture/ecology and city planning. 

Recent graduates awarded the B.S. in Environ- 
mental Design have found the department's broad 
educational approach an important asset because it 
has given them access to a wide variety of careers 
and job opportunities, has prepared them for 
specialization at a graduate professional level in 
fields such as architecture, and has also provided 
them with a foundation upon which to build an 
independent practice. 





1. Playground design with 
"found" materials 
Constance Jamison, soptiomore 

2. Residential loft interior 
Paul Stridick, soptiomore 

3. Towntiouse conversion witti 
solar panels 

Peter Gluszko, soptiomore 

4. Museum Orientation Center 
Baja Bell, senior 

5. Addition to alcoholic 
treatment facility 
George Loza, junior 

6. Historic Building recycled 
with solar energy systems 
Richard Fanelli, senior 

7. Redesign of the Environmental 
Design Department 

J. Rofkind, junior 

8. Announcement for "opening" 
of the Environment Design 
Department 

Kathy Chang, sophomore 



,r^ 



(n 



Tfrv L 



^ - ■^-^ 




:-iV^jlH 


ctiona ' 




;,:Jt,.:«.lllirf:ili.i:,^ ^^" 




IM 


™"- 


Cllorw 











^ ^- '4:i:^:Og; 



)NORTM/SOUTH 




ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN DEPT. 



^*^ 







19 



Graphic Design 



Hans-Ulrich Allemann, 
Chairperson 
Richard Feiton. 
Assistant Chairperson 



C 



Graphic Design consists of the organization of 
words, symbols, and pictorial images to convey 
information and feelings about products, services, 
and ideas. 

The program in graphic design stresses the 
development of basic thought and perceptual skills 
which form a basis for visual communication. 

The controlled shaping and clarification of visual 
images is taught as an integrated activity where 
technical mastery and perceptual coherency are 
simultaneously pursued. 

Larger contexts for the graphic message, such 
as sign systems, publications, exhibits, packaging, 
visual identification programs and other publicity 
modes are explored in depth. 

Value throughout is placed on thorough research, 
design-aesthetic and logical clarity, material integrity 
and concept originality as expressed during the de- 
velopmental process and in the final graphic product. 

Throughout the three years, courses in graphic 
application are combined with exploratory visual 
studies in drawing, color, photography, and 
typography. 

Graduates work in design groups or studios, in 
advertising agencies, as in-house designers with 
corporations, publishers, schools, architects and 
other institutions, or as independent self-employed 
designers. 





Philadelphia Fire Department 



JDh^A^ 




1. Alea Garrecht, senior 

2. Karen Klaich, junior 

3. Sophomore Cubes 

4. Andrew Brown, junior 

5. Daniel Moore, senior 

6. Carol Bender, junior 

7. Andrew Brown, junior 

8. Penelope Malish, senior 

9. Alea Garrecht, senior 

10. Kevin Kuenster, junior 

1 1 . Joseph Rapone, junior 



20 










# 



WATER 






and 

SEWER 

efneraencies 



% 





^r.<V. ////////////////////^ 







TDIVE 
i 



I J 

I I . 



'T^' 



21 



Illustration 



.?f^ 



Illustration is concerned with the entire field of 
pictorial representation and design in conjunction 
with verbal exposition. The profession touches upon 
all areas of visual communication including books, 
periodicals, educational aids, advertising in all its 
forms, and television. 

Illustrators do not work alone. In their creative 
efforts they collaborate with writers, editors, art 
directors, and clients, and since the sum of their 
efforts is generally reproduced through either printed 
or electronic media, the final product is achieved 
jointly with printers and/or film technicians. In this 
collaborative venture, the illustrator is a primary 
force for aesthetic quality and so his or her artistic 
and technical standards must be of the highest 
order. The advancement of these standards is a 
most important aspect of the student's training in 
the college's Illustration department 

During the first two years of the major program 
there is a strong emphasis on drawing, pictorial 
composition, design, and studies in the fine arts 
including painting, art history, and photography. 
Assignments are both basic and experimental in 
nature, planned to give a foundation of competence 
and analytical perception, while at the same time, 
stimulating creative thought processes which will 
extend the pupil's conception beyond the pragmatic 
and conventional. As the student advances, class- 
room work is supplemented by more individualized 
student-teacher tutorial relationships. Advanced 
assignments focus more specifically on the demands 
and parameters of commercial illustration problems. 
Augmenting the entire program are visiting critics 
and professionals from a wide variety of disciplines. 

All instructors are practicing professionals, aware 
of today's qualitative standards and the constantly 
changing nature of illustration. The over-riding goal 
of the department is for the college-trained illus- 
trator to be an innovator and leader in the profes- 
sion; able to handle numerous problems competently 
and unwilling to settle for the ordinary either in 
specific projects or in his or her professional 
life style. 

The profession has developed new vitality and 
importance in the last decade and affords extremely 
rewarding opportunities. However, prospective 
illustrators should realize that it is also a highly 
competitive and demanding profession. The student 
of illustration must possess conviction and a 
positive sense of dedication to hard work and to 
the fine arts. 





,^0Cf^M 




22 




1 . Barbara Wolfe, senior 

2. Roz Ivens. senior 

3. Mallory Yago. junior 

4. Patricia Johnson, junior 

5. Charlotte Daley, senior 

6. Joe Stewart, senior 

7. Barbara Wolfe, senior 

8. Nancy Bennett, senior 

9. Terry Diamond, senior 

10. Jeffrey Robinson, junior 

11. Bill Cleaver, senior 



23 



Industrial Design 



Designers are intermediaries for understanding the 
relationships between people, technology, and the 
environment. They are involved with planning effec- 
tive strategies and discovering appropriate solutions 
to improve the quality of our lives. The industrial 
designer is particularly concerned with controlling, 
affecting, and influencing the near environment of 
people, especially with regard to the quality of the 
products and services which industry provides for 
our use. 

At PCA, the Industrial Design department is 
interested in developing the primary capabilities 
which will permit students to begin to contribute as 
designers. We believe these capabilities are: 

1 . The ability to evolve and define aesthetic and 
social values necessary to the individual in 
our society. 

2. A basic knowledge of the aesthetic, social, and 
physical needs of people. 

3. An understanding of the historic and con- 
temporary effects of technology on life. 

4. A basic mastery of the conceptual skills of 
research and problem-solving, which are comple- 
mented by the ability to use all forms of communi- 
cation necessary to present findings clearly. 

5. A fundamental understanding of the effective use 
of systems, structures, materials and processes 
which employ and extend the positive uses of 
mass production and marketing. 

6. The ability to develop and sustain professional 
values and practices which encourage the 
designer to serve while satisfying need for con- 
tinuing personal growth. 

The means for developing these capabilities are 
to be evolved, clarified, and revised by the creative 
efforts of the community of professors (faculty and 
students) who will work within the curriculum during 
the coming year. 



1 . Nick Mohat, senior 

2. Kathy Ziegler, sophomore 

3. Jeff [Hull, sophomore 

4. John Hayes, senior 

5. Linda Procaccino, sophomore 

6. Bob Kehl, sophomore 




<♦ 



C 




24 




^ 




human factors 






25 



Painting and Drawing 



Cynthia Carlson, 
Gerald Nichols, 
Co-Chairpeople 



In preparing students for a career in the fine arts, the 
Painting and Drawing department concerns itself 
primarily with the problems of two-dimensional 
worl<. However, the study of sculptural and environ- 
mental forms is not overlool<ed, particularly since the 
nature of painting and drawing has been much influ- 
enced by these forms in recent years. The department 
places great emphasis on the fundamentals of paint- 
ing and drawing as skills, involving both materials 
and techniques. At the same time, emphasis is given 
to the development of the individual's initiative and 
capacity for self-criticism. 

Sophomore students who elect to join the depart- 
ment as majors spend equal amounts of time working 
in painting and drawing areas. Both activities are 
important to the student's development, and the 
painting /drawing major will continue to be directed 
toward shared involvement throughout his or her 
career in this department. 

A faculty of practicing professional artists presents 
the students with a structured sequence of problems, 
exploring the field from the rudiments of pictorial 
organization to the refinements of aesthetic inter- 
pretation. Studio work is augmented by seminars, 
courses in theory, programs of visiting lecturers, and 
field trips to various museums in Philadelphia, sub- 
urban Pennsylvania, and bordering states. This sup- 
plementan/ curriculum is designed to expand 
conceptual range, capacity for criticism, and 
personal vision. 

Sophomore and junior painting majors at PCA 
have a unique opportunity to spend one semester 
living, working, and studying under the auspices of 
the Artists for Environment Program. This program's 
facility is located at the Delaware Water Gap 
National Recreation Area, a 70,000 acre tract of 
mountainous country in the Delaware River Valley 
at Columbia, New Jersey, PCA's participation in this 
program is made possible by our affiliation with the 
Union of Independent Colleges of Art. This unusual 
program provides a place where artists and students 
can concentrate on their work and reroot their 
identities in nature and the environment. 





26 










1. Joe Arnold, senior 

2. Nancy Wentz, senior 

3. Alice Wysell, senior 

4. Beverly Fishman, senior 

5. Andy Vincenti, senior 

6. Marian Greenholz, senior 

7. Susan Napack, senior 

8. Tom Ferris, senior 

9. Russ Buckingham, senior 




27 



Photography and Film 



Photography and Film encompass a broad range of 
forms and functions. As descriptive and interpretive 
media they serve to record and define our social and 
physical environment. Pursued for their expressive 
and creative possibilities they reveal and shape 
attitudes, concepts, and feelings. The Photography 
and Film department concerns itself with this whole 
spectrum, within which students are helped both to 
develop a personal vision and to acquire the appro- 
priate tools and discipline to pursue it. 

The department's programs are designed to move 
the student in a thorough, orderly progression through 
the principal problems and materials of the field, while 
permitting ample opportunities for individual interests 
to find outlets in special concentrations or emphases. 
During the first year of the program the student 
explores both photography and filmmaking, not only 
for the specific concerns of each, but also as inter- 
related disciplines. After the initial year, the photog- 
raphy or film major concentrates on a program of 
study in his or her chosen area, although work in the 
other medium may be continued on an elective basis. 

Within the still photography area, students may 
place special emphasis on their work in any of the 
department's principal directions, including color 
printing, studio photography, multimedia performance 
in addition to contemporary black-and-white con- 
cerns. In the filmmaking area, specialized concentra- 
tions are available in independent filmmaking, 
cinematography and production, and animation. In 
addition, an increasing number of students have 
arranged individualized programs which involve sub- 
stantial course work in one or two other departments 
while majoring in photography and film, or which 
combine a substantial "minor" in photography and/or 
film with a major in another department. 

Whether serving a major or supportive role in the 
student's educational program, the department aims 
to provide a sound basis of competence and 
resourcefulness on which the student can continue 
to grow beyond the formal college experience. 




1. Maria Matkowski, sophomore 

2. Norman Taffel, junior 

3. Production crew for "Betrayal" 

4. Catherine Leuthoid, junior 

5. James Toth, senior 

6. Gregg Dukes, senior 

7. Jon Fisher, sophomore 

8. Mark Garvin, junior 



28 







29 



Printmaking 



The Printmaking department bases its instructional 
program on the development and realization of 
individual visual ideas primarily through multiple 
image processes. 

The department offers extensive facilities and 
expertise for work in traditional and contemporary 
print methods. All majorgraphic media — relief, 
intaglio, lithography, and silk screen — are studied. 
The students are encouraged to explore various 
graphic means appropriate to their imagery. Courses 
in book design stimulate experimentation in unifying 
the elements of paper (as well as other materials), 
prints, typography, construction, and bookbinding. 
Creative concepts courses focus a particular attention 
to the development of ideas from their inception, 
articulation, and resolution. Visiting artists, field trips, 
and guest lecturers supplement studio experience. 

Paralleling the workshop experience is the print 
study seminar, held at the print department of the 
Philadelphia Museum of Art and the Alverthorpe 
Gallery in Jenkintown (Rosenwald Collection of the 
National Collection of Fine Arts and Library of 
Congress). It provides an opportunity for students 
to study original prints from the 15th through the 20th 
centuries. Trips to museums and private collections 
facilitate and widen the scope of investigation of the 
graphic, symbolic and esthetic characteristics inher- 
ent in each medium. 

The main emphasis over the three year period of 
study is the evolution of the students as artists making 
individualized demands upon the processes. This is 
reinforced with stimulation from related areas of 
interest: graphic design, photography, crafts, etc. 
As with any study and development in fine arts, the 
experience should be multidimensional, reflective 
of a broad range of personal and professional 
involvement. 

Department graduates may choose to continue 
their development with graduate studies elsewhere or 
find more immediate application of their quest for 
professional achievement in the areas of fine arts, 
education, book design and production, graphic arts, 
illustration and edition printing. 





30 



1. Laura Aumann, junior 

2. Connie Benham, senior 

3. Lisa Chovnicl<, senior 

4. Eric Van Der Vlugt, junior 

5. Yonina Blech, senior 

6. Jennifer Woods, junior 

7. Deborain Gausmann, junior 

8. Diane Messinger, senior 










31 



Sculpture 



Walter Eriebacher, Every force evolves a form. 

Interim Chairperson Shaker proverb 

In the process of education, a college cannot create 
artists: it can only provide an environment conducive 
to growth, a place where progress and ideas are 
generated. 

At PCA, the primary concern of the Sculpture 
department is to offer a curriculum and provide the 
facilities which will enable each student to work to 
the full extent of his or her ability. In our students, we 
look for a combination of enthusiasm and persist- 
ence, a willingness to learn, and an eagerness to 
explore. Personal satisfaction grows as students 
come to realize and discover their own unique 
capabilities. 

The department insists upon a solid foundation of 
skills and technical competence. The curriculum of 
the sophomore year is, therefore, based upon studio 
courses with specific objectives providing students 
with a knowledge of traditional forms and enabling 
them to pursue independent work with assurance. 
The department encourages students to acquire a 
sense of the history of their craft, believing that such 
perspective provides a frame of reference for an 
intelligent understanding of modern concepts. In the 
junior and senior years, students work closely with 
faculty in a studio atmosphere, evolving individual 
creative problems and initiating their solutions. 

Throughout the program, the department stresses 
clarity of purpose and articulation of ideas; for this 
reason, there is considerable emphasis within the 
curriculum on drawing and on verbal exposition. 

In addition to the studio regimen, guest critics, 
field trips, and discussion groups supplement the 
course material and provide the exposure needed for 
mature self-evaluation. To implement its program, 
the department offers a full range of resources per- 
mitting work in a variety of techniques and materials, 
both traditional and experimental, including metal 
casting, welding, forging, woodworking, and plastics. 



32 





1 . Fred Crist, senior 

2. Melody Hunt, senior 

3. Wendy Levin, sophomore 

4. Christopher Storb, senior 

5. Scott Evans, senior 

6. Cheryl Neibauer, senior 

33 




Education 



Teacher Certification 

Undergraduate 

The teaching of art offers opportunities for students 
to worl< in a profession that provides possibilities for 
their own continued growth while they, in turn, provide 
forthe aesthetic and creative experiences of children 
and young adults. In preparing students for careers 
in education PCA is committed to producing gradu- 
ates who are "able to do" as well as "able to teach." 
To that end the education department offers a com- 
petency based program leading to the Pennsylvania 
Instructional I Certificate, qualifying the student to 
teach art Kindergarten through twelfth grade. 

The curriculum is designed to provide the student 
with both the theoretical and practical knowledge 
necessary for effective teaching. Students gain a 
command of the theories and concepts supporting art 
and education and are involved in initial teaching 
experiences at the sophomore level. Opportunities 
to teach in open and traditional classroom settings as 
well as the college's multi-age Saturday School 
provide experiences directed toward the development 
of excellence in teaching. 

While pursuing the BFA or BS in a studio majorthe 
student may enroll in the Teacher Certification 
Program and receive the bachelor's degree and a 
teaching certificate as part of the four year program. 

Post-Graduate 

Students who hold bachelor's degrees enroll in the 
certification program as special students. Program 
requirements will be determined by the student's 
qualifications. Special students normally complete 
the program in two semesters. 



Master of Arts in Art Education 

Graduate study at PCA offers students the opportunity 
to pursue individually designed innovative combina- 
tions of education and visual studies. Choosing from 
one of the college's major studio departments, 
students are able to combine advanced studies in the 
studio with those in education and liberal arts. The 
education components of the program are theoretical 
and culminate in a thesis project reflecting original 
investigation. Upon graduation, students pursue 
careers in educational media, alternative educational 
systems, museum education, studio production, 
research and teaching. 



1 . Books by 5th and 6th graders, 
students of Gary Kravitz, senior 

2. Alex Generalis, graduate student 

3. Lisbeth Bornhofft. graduate student 

4. Lisbeth Bornhofft, graduate student 

5. Garyn Levitsky, graduate student 




34 




PLASTER M^Motb 




ST«T scvcm; hmj I 










35 



Related Arts 



One-eighth to one-quarter or more of a student's 
curriculum at the college is in the elective studio com- 
ponent called related arts. Each major studio area 
offers courses specifically designed as related arts, 
and, in addition, many major courses are open to 
non-majors. Through the related arts, students can 
broaden their individual fields of interest and explore 
areas quite removed from their major departmental 
concerns or supplement and strengthen the major 
program with parallel studies from other departments. 
The elective areas are critical to PCA's education. 
Through the electives students design their own cur- 
riculum, individualize their preparation, and formulate 
intriguing combinations of concepts, materials, and 
techniques. 



Liberal Arts 




The Liberal Arts Department recognizes that man's 
experience has been preserved through art works, 
books, music, and other cultural records. The con- 
cerns of these records encompass the ethical, 
cultural, and social questions which have confronted 
all humans since the beginning of time as we know it. 
These concerns will continue to occupy most of us 
at PCA throughout our lives. We believe that an art 
student must include studies in the social and 
behavioral sciences, art history, philosophy, history, 
literature, to know what it has been — and is — to 
be human, to make value judgments, to select the 
wiser course of action. At PCA this heritage is 
questioned, investigated, and analyzed by students 
and faculty. 

Patricia Cruser, 
Associate Dean 









fCtcJlM-UWl 



"World History: 3000 B.C. -1688 A.D. 
chalk on slate. 



' garish colored 



36 



Art Therapy 




The Art Therapy concentration at PCA equips stu- 
dents with practical experience in art while they 
acquire a background in psychology and behavioral 
sciences. The college's affiliation with Eastern 
Pennsylvania Psychiatric Institute, a training and 
research center, provides students with a general 
introduction to the field of mental health and the 
fundamentals of working in a mental hospital. Psy- 
chiatric problems are observed and discussed 
through field visits and direct personal experiences. 

While majoring in one of the studio departments 
of the college, students may enroll in the art therapy 
program. The concentration in art therapy is 
designed to afford students the opportunity to make 
a career decision while still on the undergraduate 
level and to prepare them for graduate work. 





Art Therapy practicum at Eastern Pernnsylvania 
Psychiatric Institute, 




37 



Cooperative and Exchange Programs 



Union of Independent Colleges of Art 

PCA is a member of the Union of Independent 
Colleges of Art (UICA), a consortium of nine, private, 
independent art and design colleges. Other members 
are: 

Atlanta College of Art 

California College of Arts and Crafts 

Cleveland Institute of Art 

Kansas City Art Institute 

Maryland Institute, College of Art 

Minneapolis College of Art and Design 

San Francisco Art Institute 

Sctiool of the Art Institute of Chicago 

The UICA colleges have designed an intriguing 
array of cooperative programs which serve to expand 
and enrich your educational opportunities. The 
Student Mobility Program offers you the possibility of 
spending a semester or a year as a visiting student 
on the campus of another member college. You could 
participate in the Siiared Foreign Study Program at 
the first international associate member of the UICA, 
the Osa(<a University of the Arts in Japan. Advanced 
undergraduate students have the option of spending 
a semester at the Delaware Watergap Recreation 
Area under the UICA/ Artists for the Environment 
Program. A Transfer Program gives students enrolled 
at any UICA member college the chance to transfer 
to another UICA college without loss of credit. 

The UICA National Placement Service is a coor- 
dinated and cooperative effort to create a unified 
national listing of career opportunities currently avail- 
able to artists. Additional programs include the UICA 
Film Center, a Visiting Artists Program, curriculum 
development, faculty exchange, and a variety of other 
special programs. 

If you would like more information on the Union of 
Independent Colleges of Art, write for the publication 
that describes the UICA and the member colleges. 
The address is: UICA, 4340 Oak Street, Kansas City, 
Missouri 641 11. 



East Coast Art Colleges' 
Student Exchange Program 

Selected PCA students may spend a semester as an 
exchange student at any of a number of other schools 
in the east coast area. Participating colleges are: 

Cooper Union School of Art 

Maryland Institute, College of Art 

Massachusetts College of Art 

Nova Scotia College of Art and Design 

Parsons School of Design 

Rhode Island School of Design 

School of the Museum of Fine Arts 

Foreign and Summer Study Programs 

PCA students are encouraged to apply for admission 
to the visual arts programs at colleges, universities, 
and institutes in the United States and other countries. 
Written approval from the PCA chairperson for PCA 
credit upon successful completion of studies at 
another institution must, of course, be obtained. 
Summer programs and international art institutes 
where PCA students have recently enrolled include: 

The Academies of Fine Arts in Florence and Rome 

Blossom-Kent Art Program, Kent State University 

Croydon College of Art, England 

Epson College of Art and Design, England 

The Fulbright-Hays Grants 

Lake Placid School of Art, New/ York 

Royal College of Art, England 

Scandinavian Seminar 

Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, Maine 

Tyler School of Art in Rome 

Yale-Norfolk Summer School, Connecticut 

Pennsylvania Academy/ PCA 
Cooperative Program 

In 1970, PCA and the Pennsylvania Academy of the 
Fine Arts inaugurated an extraordinary transfer 
program to serve the Academy's scholastically 
qualified four year certificate candidates and 
graduates who seek a baccalaureate degree. PAFA 
graduates and students currently enrolled in the 
PAFA certificate program who gain formal Academy 
endorsement are admissible to PCA as degree- 
credit registrants. These registrants complete PCA's 
prevailing liberal arts credit requirements for its 
Bachelor of Fine Arts degree. They will be consid- 
ered to have fulfilled PCA's studio requirements for 
degree graduation upon receipt of the Academy's 
certificate. 

Reciprocally, the Academy will accommodate 
PCA students who wish to augment their studio 
programs by registering for selected PAFA course 
offerings, class size permitting. 



38 




Life Long Education 

Evening Division 

Barbara Ward, 
Director 

A variety of options for part-time study are available 
in PCA's Evening Division during tfie fall, spring and 
summer semesters. Students may register on a credit 
or audit basis for courses w/hich range from an intro- 
ductory level to advanced professional study in all 
studio areas offered at the college. The three evening 
foundation courses may be taken in lieu of the port- 
folio requirements for day college admissions. In 
three fields of study — advertising design, illustration, 
and interior design — professional preparation may 
be structured toward a Certificate. 

The Saturday School 

Karen Saler, 
Coordinator 

An open enrollment, non-credit program of visual 
studies is offered at PCA on Saturdays during the fall 
and spring semesters for students aged eight to 
eighty. Staffed by professional artist-teachers and 
student teachers, the Saturday School is under the 
direction of the Education Department. Course 
offerings include drawing, painting, sculpture, figure 
drawing, printmal<ing, photography, ceramics, 
jewelry, elementary and junior high worl<shops. 

Pre-College Program 

Robert Stein, 
Director 

A five-week summer studio program is offered for 
high school students who have completed at least the 
tenth grade and college students who wish to explore 
the visual arts. The Pre-College Program is patterned 
after the college's Foundation curriculum and pro- 
vides a solid introduction to the basic elements of 
professional art education. Under the direction of 
professional artists/faculty, students encounter many 
of the concepts, techniques, standards, and proce- 
dures of education in the visual arts. 

Drawing, two-dimensional design, and three- 
dimensional design form the core of the program. In 
addition, students roster two elective courses from a 
selection including painting, printmaking, sculpture, 
photography, ceramics, fibers, jewelry, graphic 
design, and illustration. 



39 



Scholarships and Commencement Prizes 



Baugh Barber Fund 

E. O. Aaron Memorial Fund 

Biddle Scholarship Fund 

James M. Cresson Scholarship Fund 

Crozier Prize Fund 

Desilver Scholarship Fund 

Edward Tonkin Dobbins Scholarship Fund 

William H. Ely Bequest 

Clayton French Scholarship Fund 

The Gillespie Scholarship Fund 

Graff Prize Fund 

The Emily Leiand Harrison Scholarship Fund 

The John Harrison Scholarship Fund 

Thomas Skelton Harrison Fund 

William & Kate J. Hofacker Scholarship Fund 

Mrs. M. Theresa Keehmie Scholarship Fund 

Charles Godfrey Leiand Memorial Scholarship Fund 

Henry Perry Leiand Prize Fund 

Frank Hamilton Magee Scholarship Fund 

Georgia B. Mcllhenny Scholarship Fund 

Mr. & Mrs. John Mcllhenny Scholarship Fund 

Thornton Oakley Bequest 

Gertrude C. Partenheimer Scholarship Fund 

Ramborger Scholarship Fund 

Bernice Travis Rudnick Memorial Scholarship Fund 

Roberts Prize Fund 

Sinnott Prize Fund 

Annie E. Sinnott Scholarship Fund 

Temple Fund 

Weightman Scholarship Fund 

Rynear Williams, Jr. Memorial Fund 

Vertes Prize Fund 

Alumni Association Scholarship Endowment Fund 

Scott Memorial Scholarship Endowment Fund 

Alumni Association PCA — Camden H. S. Scholarship Fund 

S. Gertrude Schell Principal Endowment Fund 

Alice H. Pechner Memorial Scholarship Fund 

Peter W. Gregory Memorial Endowment Fund 

Jane Darley Naeye Scholarship Fund 

Winifred Cantor Scholarship Endowment 

Roger Hane Memorial Endowment 

Jantzen Family Scholarship Fund 

Addle Grossman Memorial Scholarship Fund 

Lyola C. Pedrick Scholarship Fund 



Craft 

The Mr, and Mrs, Leon C. Bunkin Annual Award 

The Addie Grossman Annual Memorial Award in Jewelry 

Design and Creation 
Graphics 

The Art Directors Club Gold Medal 

The Champion Paper Imagination Scholarship 

The Royal Composing Room Inc. Award for Excellence in 

Graphic Design 

The Elmer O. Aaron Award in Graphic Design 
Illustration 

The William H. Ely Travel Award for Excellence in Illustration 

The Hunt Manufacturing Company Annual Award in Illustration 

The Marcel Vertes Award to a Senior Whose Drawing of the 

Human Figure has been Outstanding 

The Roger Hane Annual Memorial Award 
Industrial Design 

The Delaware Valley Exhibit Designer and Producers 

Association Award 

The Jacob Labe, Jr, Annual Memorial Award 
Painting and Drawing 

The Bocour Prize in Painting 

The Stuart M, Egnal Prize in Painting 

The Gimbel Prize in Painting 

The Gross-McCleaf Gallery Painting Award in Memory of 

Mr. Nathan Gross 

The Hunt Manufacturing Company Annual Award in Painting 

The Philadelphia Watercolor Club Award 

The F. Weber Company Annual Award in Painting 

The Western Savings Bank Painting Award 

The Winsor and Newton Painting Award 
Prinfmaking 

The Print Club Annual Award 
Sculpture 

The McCracken Award for Welded Sculpture 




Seven foot fluorescent red sevens helped pay tribute to the 
graduating class of 1977 and noted illustrator Saul Steinberg. 



40 







The College's admissions policies and practices guarantee 
fair educational opportunity in concert witti existing Federal 
and Commonwealth laws against discrimination for reasons 
of race, color, sex, religion or national origin. 



^ 



A^^L 












There is as much art to being a student as there is 
to being an artist. An extraordinary student is one 
who learns and uses his or her educational and 
learning environment to the fullest extent and who 
stimulates teaching motility by intelligent questioning. 

Each year, we select from among our applicants 
those whom we feel will most fully benefit by study 
at PCA. The Admissions Committee prefers those 
applicants who choose to express themselves 
through visual images; who demonstrate the 
intellectual abilities to meet, question, and challenge 
the ideas of their time; who wish to increase their 
awareness of themselves and of their world and to 
address their environment in a positive, individual 
manner; and who bring energy, concern, humor, 
and initiative to their inquiry. The college believes 
that diversity is essential to establish a well-balanced 
mixture of experience and opinion. In our student 
body, differences in age and racial, educational, 
and cultural background help insure a genuine 
learning environment. 

Admission to college should be a comprehensive 
and reciprocal process, with knowledgeable choices 
made by both the applicant and the institutions to 
which he or she is applying. We hope that you will 
ask as many questions of us as we will of you, that 
you will investigate the college thoroughly through 
this and other publications, and that you will find 
an opportunity to visit PCA in order to see our 
students, classrooms, and facilities at first hand. 



43 



Freshman Admission 



Application Requirements for 
First-Time Freslimen* 

1. High School Transcript 

2. Portfolio 

3. CEEB Scholastic Aptitude Test 
(for course placement only) 

4. Optional — Interview 

5. Optional — Self-Presentation 
*Transfer applicants see page 5 

Scholastic Requirements 

Freshmen must be graduates of an accredited 
secondary school or the equivalent. A curriculum of 
college preparatory subjects is recommended. 
Specific course distribution is not required, although 
a minimum of four (4) years of English and two (2) 
of history is strongly recommended. Remaining 
courses should be selected from the approved 
college preparatory program, including studies in 
languages, mathematics, sciences, humanities, art 
history, psychology and sociology. A minimum of 
two (2) years of art and design is recommended. 

Scholastic Requirements Without High 
School Graduation 

Applicants not holding regular high school 
diplomas may qualify for admission consideration 
by one of the following methods: 

1. GED (General Education Diploma) tests are 
acceptable on conversion to a state diploma 
through the department of public instruction of 
the applicant's resident state. 

2. Applicants not holding a diploma may qualify for 
admission consideration through the College Level 
Examination Program (CLEP). General Examina- 
tion scores should be forwarded to the Admissions 
Office with all available scholastic records. CLEP 
is administered monthly through the testing 
centers of most major universities from which 
registration information may be obtained. 



Early Admission 

PCA will accept applications from qualified high 
school juniors for entrance as freshmen in 
September provided either of the following 
conditions is met: 

1. By taking an overload during the junior year or 
summer courses, the applicant is able to complete 
high school diploma credit requirements and 
receive the diploma before fall enrollment; or 

2. Under written agreement, the candidate's high 
school authorities grant the applicant a high 
school diploma upon completion of the freshman 
year at PCA. 

Deferred Admission 

PCA will accept applications from candidates who 
plan a year of activities, work or travel between 
high school and college and who, therefore, wish to 
enter college one full year after graduation from 
high school. A brief note explaining the deferment 
should be attached to the application. Deferred 
applicants should follow procedures listed in this 
brochure; a tentative decision on the deferred 
application will be tendered when the file is complete. 

Any applicant offered admission to the current 
September freshman class who wishes to defer en- 
rollment until the following September may also 
request this consideration. Deferred candidates will 
be required to submit a statement of their activities 
and reaffirm their interest in PCA before January 15 
of the academic year preceding desired 
matriculation. 

Portfolio 

Your portfolio should describe you as a visual 
person. PCA does not list specific requirements nor 
assign problems to be solved. The portfolio should 
reflect your visual experiences to date; projects 
completed for Saturday, summer or outside classes, 
as well as your high school program work, and work 
done without supervision. The best way to put together 
a portfolio is to select from a representative group of 
your collected work that which demonstrates your 
strengths, depth in areas of particular interest and the 
range of your visual abilities and exposure. You tell us 
a great deal about yourself by the selection of the 
pieces in your portfolio, so choose thoughtfully and 
carefully — and make the selection yourself. 



44 



Portfolio Requirements 

A portfolio of at least twelve (1 2) pieces of 
original work. 

1. Portfolios sent to the college must be presented 
in color slides or color photographs with a 
separate list of descriptions. Slides or photo- 
graphs must be numbered to correspond with 
their descriptions. You should indicate the size 
and media of the work and briefly explain the 
concept, project or problem involved. When more 
than one picture is used to illustrate a piece 

(i.e. sculpture, ceramics, 3-dimensional design, 
etc.), the slides should be labeled in sequence 
(2a, 2b, etc.). Slides should be presented in 
872" X 11" slide file pages and clearly labeled 
with the applicant's name. 

2. Freshmen applicants selecting the interview with 
portfolio option may present actual work and/or 
slides. All work will be reviewed and discussed 
during the interview. 

Options or Additions to the Portfolio 

1 . You may choose to supplement or replace the 
portfolio with the PCA Pre-College Program. Any 
applicant who wishes to substitute this experience 
for the portfolio requirement must give written 
notice to the Admissions Office. 

2. PCA's Evening Division offers three portfolio level 
courses — Drawing 1, Color and Design 1 and 
Form Study 1. Any applicant who has or will 
complete all three courses by June may choose to 
substitute these grades for the portfolio; written 
notice must be given to the Admissions Office. 

Interview 

Applicants are invited to visit the college and have 
an interview with a member of the admissions staff, 
alumni, senior student, or faculty. If you select an 
interview with portfolio, you will be expected to 
present your work during the scheduled meeting. 

PCA has not established a format or schedule of 
questions for the interview; the primary responsibility 
rests on the applicant. In general, you should discuss 
your visual background, training and goals, other 
interests, special problems, and so forth. You should 
use the time wisely to let the interviewer discover 
what is important to you, the elements of your back- 
ground and personality which make you unique, 
and the reasons you have selected an arts college 
for your education. 

It is equally important for you to investigate the 
college. The interview provides an opportunity for 
you to find out if PCA has the programs, philoso- 



phies, faculties and environment which are most 
suited for your education. 

Whenever possible, interviews will be arranged 
within the month requested by the applicant. Inter- 
views are scheduled during office hours (9-5), 
Mondays through Fridays. It is not possible for us 
to arrange appointments on Saturdays. 

Self-Presentation 

There are many elements which contribute to the 
making of a good artist or art student which are not 
represented in standard admissions criteria. PCA 
encourages applicants to design their own applica- 
tion process by supplementing the required records 
and portfolio with any additional credentials they 
think helpful. By broadening and individualizing the 
application process, you will help us to see you as 
an individual with special interests and background. 

Any self-presentation options that you wish the 
Admissions Committee to use in evaluating your ap- 
plication for admission to PCA should be presented 
within two months from the date of application. 

Suggested Self-Presentation Options 

Letters of reference 

Statement of purpose or autobiography 

Sketchbooks or ideabooks 

Visual Presentations (not substitutes for the portfolio) 

slides or photos of additional work 

films 

independent visual projects 
Supplemental portfolio of work in one 

concentrated area 
Original writings 
Testing results: 

CEEB Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) 

American College Testing (ACT) 

CEEB Achievement Tests 

Other 
Musical, dance, drama, etc. 

CEEB Scholastic Aptitude Test 

CEEB SAT results are not required for admissions 
evaluation; they will be used as an ingredient in 
application evaluation only if you select them as 
one of your self-presentation options. 

However, SAT results are required of all first-time 
freshmen for course placement. Score results must 
be submitted prior to May 1 . 



45 



Application Procedures 

PCA practices a block system of admissions for the 
freslnman class. Decisions will be mailed on the first 
of every month beginning January to those who have 
completed application requirements by the 15th of 
the preceding month. Although we reserve space in 
the foundation class for late applicants, we urge 
candidates who are applying for financial aid to 
complete applications for admission prior to February 
15 in order to receive consideration for assistance. 

Applicants offered admission to the freshman 
class before April 15 are required to submit a $100 
tuition deposit and a notification of intention to 
enroll before May 1 . Applicants who receive an 
affirmative answer after April 1 5 must remit the 
tuition deposit within three weeks of the offer of 
admission. The tuition deposit is not refundable 
after May 1 . 

A maxmum of two months is allowed between 
receipt of application and submission of all 
supporting credentials. Because of the large number 
of applicants, the Admissions Office must ask the 
candidate to assume responsibility for his or her own 
application procedure. Files are checked to monitor 
applications and notices are sent when credentials 
are overdue; if no response to such notice is received, 
the files are closed. 

Conditional Admission 

Offers of admission may specify one or more of the 

following conditions: 

1 . Successful completion of PCA's summer Pre- 
College Program. This condition is made when the 
portfolio review indicates that additional studio 
preparation is necessary to insure a student's 
success in the Foundation curriculum. 

The Pre-College Program includes studies in 
drawing, two-dimensional design and three- 
dimensional design as well as several elective 
courses. Classes are scheduled for a five-week 
session, 30 hours of instruction per week, during 
the month of July. 



2. Successful completion of PCA's Pre-Freshman 
Academic and Studio Workshop. This requirement 
is made when the Admissions Committee 
determines that additional scholastic training 

as well as studio preparation is necessary. 

The program involves workshops in reading and 
writing skills and studio course work. For the past 
five summers, this workshop has been funded by 
the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania's Higher 
Education Equal Opportunity Act. 

3. Academic Probation. Requiring achievement of a 
"C" (2.0) grade point average at the end of the 
freshman year in order to be promoted to the 
second year level. 

Admissions Decisions 

PCA has not constructed a model against which to 
measure all aspirants to the freshman class and 
there is no weight or rank assigned to application 
credentials. Each applicant is judged on both 
objective and subjective criteria. Portfolio, records, 
and self-presentation options are reviewed together 
to establish a picture of each candidate; using 
these composites, decisions are made as to which 
applicants will be best served by study at PCA. 
Offers of admission are made to those who demon- 
strate the combination of visual and academic 
training and abilities, personal qualities, stamina 
and motivation to be successful in an extremely 
demanding program of study. 

The Admissions Committee believes that a 
decision to deny admission in no way reflects upon 
the future of that individual as an artist, nor his or 
her success at another college, nor his or her 
potential at PCA after more training and education. 



Fees and Deposits 



Amount 



Due 



Refund Date 



Application $ 20.00 

Tuition Deposit $100.00 

Housing Deposit $ 75.00 

Pre-College Program Deposit $ 50.00 



with application 
May 1 
June 1 
June 1 



no refunds 

refundable until May 1 
refundable until June 1 
refundable until June 1 



46 



PCA considers any applicant who lias been enrolled 
in a college-level program of studies after secondary 
school to be a transfer applicant. Transfers enjoy a 
preferred position among applicants for admission 
since it can be assumed they have matured in their 
goals and have demonstrated their abilities at 
the college level. 



Transfer Admission 

Advanced Standing 

Students transferring into the sophomore or junior 
level in major department and related arts studio 
work are considered advanced standing candidates. 
The first year at PCA includes 21 semester credits of 
studio class work — in foundation (drawing, two- 
dimensional design, three-dimensional design) and 
elective courses. Students who have completed 21 
or more semester credits in studio and who have 
studied in the foundation areas, may apply for 
sophomore status. 

At the end of the sophomore year at PCA, students 
have accumulated approximately 42 semester credits 
in foundation, major, and elective studio areas. 
Applicants presenting 42 or more credits in studio 
and intensive study in a major area may apply for 
junior status. Please note that at PCA studio credits 
are assigned on a 2:1 class hour to credit ratio. 

Decisions concerning admission to a major depart- 
ment, class standing, and mandated prerequisites 
and/or related arts are made by major department 
faculty upon an evaluation of the admission portfolio 
and transcripts. 

Three-Year Transfer Program 

students who have not had substantial studio instruc- 
tion but who do present a minimum of 24 trans- 
ferable semester credits in liberal arts may qualify 
for the three-year transfer program. Under this pro- 
gram, students have an opportunity to fulfill PCA's 
graduation requirements in three years. In the first 
year the Foundation Program core curriculum is 
combined with studies in major department and 
related areas; if approved by both Foundation Pro- 
gram and major department chairmen, the transfer 
student may attain junior status at the start of his or 
her second year. This program requires an extremely 
demanding schedule and is best suited to mature 
students who have definitely decided on a choice 
of major. 

Foundation Transfers 

Transfer students with fewer than 24 transferable 
liberal arts credits and without qualifications for 
advanced standing in studio should expect to be 
registered for the Foundation Program and anticipate 
being enrolled at PCA for the equivalent of eight 
semesters. Those who qualify for either the three- 
year program or advanced standing but who wish to 
take advantage of the Foundation Program core and 
elective courses may also apply as freshman 
transfers. 



47 



Residence Requirements 

In order to satisfy requirements for tine BFA or BS 
degree in any of PCA's major departments, a student 
must complete four semesters in residence. A mini- 
mum of 63 credits must be earned at PCA, 48 in 
studio areas of winich 28 are required in a major 
concentration, and 15 credits in liberal arts courses. 

Transfer of Credit from Accredited 
institutions 

A maximum total of 67 semester credits are allowed 
in transfer. No more than 30 may be applied toward 
liberal arts requirements. Transfer of credit is 
allowed only for courses in which a grade of C or 
better (or the equivalent) has been achieved. These 
courses must also be judged to be consistent with 
PCA's standards and requirements. Transfer of 
studio credits is computed in terms of a 2 to 1 class 
hour to credit ratio, consistent with PCA practice. 

Transfer from PCA's Evening Division 

Credits for the three portfolio courses offered by 
PCA's Evening Division — • Drawing, A100E; Color 
and Design, A110E; and Form Study, A109E — 
cannot be transferred. The History of Ideas course 
will also not transfer to the day college program. 
Advanced Evening Division courses can, however, 
be transferred to the day school record. 

Transfer of Credit from Non-Accredited 
Institutions 

Students transferring from non-accredited institu- 
tions are placed at the appropriate studio level 
based on an examination of their portfolio and work 
recorded. After successful completion of one year's 
work in studio and academic courses at PCA, 
transfer students in this category may apply for 
transfer of credits for courses completed elsewhere 
which are consistent with PCA's requirements. The 
specified limitations will apply in such cases. 

Transfer Application Requirements 

1. Portfolio. 

2. Transcripts of all previous college experience and 
a listing of courses which will be completed before 
entrance into PCA. 

3. Catalog or other publication describing course 
work recorded and credit assignment for studio 
work. 

4. High school transcript (not required if the appli- 
cant holds a bachelor's degree). 



5. Advanced standing and three-year transfer appli- 
cants must present a written statement of purpose, 
outlining their objectives in future art education. 

6. Advanced standing and three-year transfer appli- 
cants must indicate the one department for which 
they wish consideration. 

7. Optionally, letters of reference from the Dean of 
Students and studio instructors of the institution 
previously attended. 

8. Transfer applicants anticipating freshman or 
three-year status may elect to complete any of the 
self-presentation options listed on page 45. 

Transfer Portfolio 

1. Applicants without extensive studio experience 
should follow portfolio instructions on pages 44-45. 

2. Advanced standing applicants should present a 
portfolio demonstrating basic abilities — -drawing, 
two-dimensional and three-dimensional — ■ as well 
as competence and preparation in the area of 
intended major. Your portfolio should generally 
represent the studio areas in which you have 
studied at the college level. 

Portfolios sent to the college must be pre- 
sented in color slides with a separate list of 
descriptions. Slides should be presented in 8y2" 
X 11" slide file pages and clearly labeled with 
the applicant's name. 

Applicants electing to present work during an 
interview (see below) may present actual work 
and/or slides. All work will be reviewed and 
discussed during the interview. 

interviews 

Applicants for advanced standing in studio or the 
three-year transfer program who file application and 
transcripts prior to April 1 will be invited to come to 
the college and meet with major departmental fac- 
ulty to discuss transfer status and programs of 
study. Application portfolios may be presented dur- 
ing this interview. If the application and transcripts 
are filed after April 1 , portfolios must be sent to the 
college in slides. Excessive demands of final cri- 
tiques and graduation prohibit scheduling of inter- 
views for advanced applicants after May 1 . 

Freshman transfers have the option of an inter- 
view with portfolio as described above. 

Notice of Admission 

Transfer applicants judged admissable at an ad- 
vanced level will be so informed when an evaluation 
of their portfolio and all credentials has been 
completed. 



48 



Advanced Placement Examination 

PCA awards three credits toward the liberal arts 
requirements for a score of 3 or better in any 
CEEB Advanced Placement examination on an 
academic subject. 

College Level Examination Placement 
Program 

Credit will be allowed toward the PCA liberal arts 
requirement for a score of 50 or better on CLEP 
subject examinations in the following areas: 
education, humanities, sciences, and social 
sciences. This allowance is only for those applicants 
who have not been enrolled in school or college 
for over two years. 

Foreign Student Applications 

Because of the lengthy procedures and extensive 
time needed to receive and evaluate credentials 
from overseas, foreign applicants should apply 
well in advance of desired admission. 

Foreign applicants whose native language is 
other than English, are required to take the Test of 
English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). If TOEFL 
scores are acceptable, the college will send the 
necessary forms for completing application. All 
foreign transcripts and other documents must be 
certified by an embassy, legation or consular 
officer of the USA. 

The college has no financial aid for students who 
are not U.S. citizens. Foreign students must file 
proof of their ability to support themselves from 
their own financial resources. 

The immigration forms necessary for student visas 
will be completed by the college only after an 
applicant has accepted an offer of admission. 

Veterans 

As an accredited degree-granting institution, the 
college is approved by the Veterans Administration. 
Information about education benefits may be 
obtained from any VA office. 



Additional Information 

Special Student Status 

Undergraduate enrollment in the day college is 
usually reserved for matriculated students pursuing 
degree graduation. Special students can be accom- 
modated for credit or audit registration in the Eve- 
ning Division, and exceptionally in the day college. 
Students applying for non-matriculated status in the 
day college should submit the undergraduate appli- 
cation form with transcripts and a portfolio of studio 
work to the Office of Admissions. Evaluation of appli- 
cation is made by the appropriate departmental 
faculty and the Director of Admissions. 

Informational Tours of the College 

We encourage applicants to investigate the college 
in as many ways as possible, and strongly recom- 
mend that you visit PCA to see our facilities and 
the work done by students. Student-guided tours 
will be arranged by appointment for applicants 
and/or families. Anyone who wishes a tour of the 
college should call or write the Admissions Office 
for an appointment. 

Group Information Sessions 

A member of PCA's admissions staff will be available 
for group informational sessions on scheduled days 
of the week. Any student, parent, counselor and/or 
art teacher who wishes to meet in a group session to 
learn about the college should contact the Admissions 
Office for an appointment. This may be coordinated 
with a tour of the college facilities, if desired. 



49 



Expenses 



PCA as a private art college is dependent primarily 
upon tuition income; our cost increases for instruction 
and other college services necessitate rising tuition 
rates. We spend substantial sums on equipment and 
the maintenance of the low faculty-student ratio so 
necessary for high-quality studio instruction. Wise 
financial planning will anticipate periodic increases in 
tuition and fees at least equal to the cost of living 
increases. 

As of the fall of 1 973, tuition and fees were 
charged on a per-credit basis and the standard 
tuition and general fee charge for full-time under- 
graduate tuition was dropped. For 1977-78 under- 
graduate tuition is $11 2 per semester credit. 

The table below is indicative of costs for the Resident Commuting 

1977-78 school year. Student Student 

Tuition & General Fees* $3696 $3696 

Student Residence Apartment 1 1 00 

Board** 550 

Art Supplies & Books 400 400 

Commuting & Lunch 350 

Estimated annual expenses: $5700-6200 $4400-4700 

(including miscellaneous expenses) 

'Estimate for full-time at ISVb credit hours 

per semester, $1 1 2 per credit. 
'Estimate of board costs assumes the use of 

apartment kitchen facilities. 



50 



Financial Aid for New Students 



Financial aid decisions are made separately from 
admissions decision and do not affect them in any 
way. When an applicant who needs aid is offered 
admission to PCA, his or her name is forwarded to 
the Financial Aid Office. If the Financial Aid Form is 
on file with the Aid Office, the applicant will be con- 
sidered for assistance. The Financial Aid Office will 
attempt to notify aid applicants of the decision taken 
within three weeks after the offer of admission has 
been tendered. 

PCA has allocated $425,000 of its total budget for 
grant aid in the current college year. In addition, the 
College funds its own job program and administers 
the following Federal college-based student assist- 
ance programs — National Direct Student Loan, 
College Work-Study, and the Supplemental Educa- 
tional Opportunity Grants — as part of its own aid 
program. 

Undergraduate financial aid awards may consist of 
grant, NDS loan, employment, or any combination of 
these depending upon family circumstances and the 
availability of aid resources. College work-study jobs 
are usually not assigned to freshmen. Students may 
not apply for a specific type of the aforementioned aid. 

Our financial aid funds are limited and we can 
offer assistance to fewer than half the freshman 
applicants who demonstrate need. Early application 
for aid and admission is important, and students are 
urged to investigate outside sources of aid. Generally 
speaking, students whose aid applications are 
received later than January 15, cannot be given 
consideration. However, we recommend that you 
submit an application, even if the deadline has 
passed, on the slight chance that funds may be 
available and so that we may advise you of other 
possible sources of aid. 



PCA aid is not restricted to a specific income level. 
The Financial Aid Office will consider a request for 
aid regardless of the amount of annual income of the 
parents. Should the individual circumstances of 
family size and/or extraordinary expenses show justi- 
fication, an award can be made. Although some 
families with annual incomes in excess of $15,000 are 
not eligible for most federal monies, many are aided 
by the college with its own grant and job funds. The 
following breakdown for the academic year 1975-76 
provides a fairly typical distribution of recipients of 
PCA grant aid by income level. 



Gross Income 


Number with Institutional Grant 


; — 2,999 


13 


3,000 — 5,999 


24 


6i000 — 7,499 


19 


7,500 — 8,999 


21 


9,000 — 11,999 


46 


12,000 — 14,999 


36 


15,000 — 19,999 


42 


20,000 — 24,999 


28 


25,000 — 29,999 


7 


30,000 and over 


4 



51 



Applications 

Those wishing to file for financial assistance from 
PCA must complete the Financial Aid Form (FAF) 
through the College Scholarship Service. The college 
has no additional special application form for financial 
aid for entering students. Students twenty-three years 
of age or older who can answer negatively to the 
following three Federal government regulations for 
the determination of independent student status will 
be permitted twelve-month budgets for the determi- 
nation of need. 

1 . Did (or will) the student live with parents or 
guardian for more than two consecutive weeks 
during the preceding year, the current year and the 
subsequent year? 

2. Was (or will) the student (be) listed as an exemp- 
tion on parents' or guardian's U.S. income tax 
return for the preceding year, the current year, and 
the subsequent year? 

3. Did (or will) the student receive financial assist- 
ance of $600 or more from parents or guardian 
during the preceding year, the current year, and 
the subsequent year? 

Parental income information is required of every 
applicant, however, regardless of the status of the 
student, independent or dependent. Any student who 
submits an FAF which does not include parental 
financial information will not be considered for aid 
from the college. The college reserves the right to 
exempt parental income if indicated. Receipt of the 
FAF form, after processing by the College Scholarship 
Service, constitutes an application for aid. 

College assistance is awarded for an academic 
year and may be renewed annually by formal 
application. Amounts awarded are determined by 
financial need only. Preference is given, in the case 
of first-time applicants, to those who demonstrate 
outstanding promise of success in PCA's curriculum. 
Other applicants who file early will also be given 
priority. A student receiving aid must maintain at 
least a C average for renewal of aid. The college 
reserves the right to terminate assistance at the end 
of the fall term if the student's record falls below 
the level for eligibility. 



When a student files for renewal of financial 
assistance for his second year at PCA, his parents 
are required to file a copy of their most recent 
Federal Income Tax form as well as the Financial Aid 
Form and to meet other application procedures, if 
the figures reported on the Form 1 040 do not 
confirm those reported on the FAF, a student 
may be denied aid. 

Students receiving awards from outside sources 
are obliged to notify the college of such aid. At no 
time can total assistance, including awards by 
outside sources, exceed the college's estimate of 
the applicant's financial requirements. 

Eligibility 

A student receiving aid must maintain at least a C 
average for renewal of aid. The college reserves the 
right to terminate assistance at the end of the fall 
term if the student's record falls below the level for 
eligibility. 

If a student has already earned a bachelor's degree 
at another institution, he or she is ineligible to file 
for aid from PCA. Students enrolled only for teacher 
certification are also ineligible; only matriculated, 
full-time, or part-time students may receive financial 
assistance through the college. Aid awards are 
normally made for a maximum of eight semesters. 
Students requiring a longer enrollment as a result 
of change of major or other circumstances, will be 
approved for continued aid on an individual basis. 
PCA cannot guarantee aid beyond a maximum of 
eight semesters and the required number of credits 
for graduation. 

Financial aid awarded by the college may be used 
only to meet educational costs incurred by enroll- 
ment at PCA or a domestic UICA Student Mobility 
arrangement. The college is not able to assist with 
enrollment at foreign institutions. 



52 



Outside Sources of Financial Aid 

Any student in need of financial aid wlno is eligible 
for state or federal grants as described, will be 
expected to file applications for such grants. The 
probable amount of state or federal aid will be 
taken into consideration in the making of a college 
award. The college will not replace aid a student is 
eligible to receive through a state or federal program, 
but for which he or she fails to apply. 

State Grants 

The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania offers sub- 
stantial grants (maximum $1200) to needy students 
and all Pennsylvania residents are expected to make 
applications to the Pennsylvania Higher Education 
Assistance Agency (PHEAA) for such assistance. 
In addition, the following states offer grants, tenable 
out-of-state, to meet education costs: Connecticut, 
Massachusetts, New Jersey, Rhode Island and 
Vermont. Inquiry should be made to your high school 
guidance counselor or your state office of education. 



State Guaranteed Loans 

All states have guaranteed loan programs. Maximum 
amounts that can be borrowed for an academic year 
range from $1500 in some states ($2500 in 
Pennsylvania) to $2500 in others. There is an 
automatic Federal interest subsidy for the period of 
enrollment if the annual adjusted income is $25,000 
or below. Repayment of loan principal begins nine 
months following graduation or withdrawal from 
the college. 

A state guaranteed loan must be treated as a 
financial resource by the college in the computation 
of its own financial aid award to a student, if the 
award includes Federal monies such as SEOG or 
NDSL. If a student has applied for aid from PCA the 
recommended procedure is for him or her to delay 
processing of the state guaranteed loan application 
until the college has acted on his or her aid 
application. 

Federal Grants 

The Basic Educational Opportunity Grant Program 
(BEOG), more commonly referred to as Basic Grants 
or BOGs, is a Federal program, which when fully 
funded, entitles every student with financial need to 
financial assistance. Maximum grants presently are 
$1400 less the amount of a student's expected 
family contribution. Applications and instructions 
for filing applications for Basic Grants are available 
from colleges, high schools and post offices. 
Students presently holding grants are normally 
mailed renewal applications. 



53 



Housing 



PCA maintains a coeducational Student Residence 
for its students whicli is located one-half block from 
the main building. The residence is a fifteen story 
apartment building housing approximately 160 
students, most of whom are freshman students. 
Enrolled upperclass students are given first option for 
available accommodations, and the remaining 
places are filled by new students. We cannot 
guarantee space at the residence, and we do not 
consider residence applications to be an ingredient 
in the admissions decision. Reservation forms are 
sent only to applicants whose tuition deposits have 
been received, and they are filled in the order 
received. 

The Residence consists of apartments, both 
double and triple, each with private bath and pullman 
kitchen. The double apartments, housing two 
students, have one large room with separate bath, 
pullman kitchen, and closet space. The triple 
apartments house three students and consist of two 
rooms, private bath, pullman kitchen and closets. 
Each apartment is furnished with beds, mattresses, 
desks, chairs, and dressers. Students must supply 
their own linens, rugs, draperies, lamps, dishes 
and other utensils for the kitchen. 

The Director of the Student Residence provides 
counseling and supervision to the residence com- 
munity and is responsible for overall residence 
management. The Director is assisted by Resident 
Advisors, upperclass students who serve as coun- 
selors on each of the freshman floors. Each resident 
student is a member of the Residents' Association, 
with its own governing Council and Judicial Board. 

Students who cannot be offered an apartment at 
the Residence are responsible for securing their 
own living quarters. Information and assistance on 
off-campus housing is available through the office 
of the Associate Dean of Students; the office, 
however, does not locate, inspect or guarantee a 
particular listing. 



54 



Curricular 
Catalog 

1977-78 






V-c;; 



r?r->: 



"■^^^■. 



Instructional Departments' 

Foundation Program 

Crafts 

Environmental Design 

Graphic Design 

Illustration 

Industrial Design 

Painting and Drawing 

Photography and Film 

Printmaking 

Sculpture 

Education 

Master's Program 

Related Arts Elecfives 

Liberal Arts • 

Art Therapy 

Adjunct and Summer Programs 

Evening Division 

Pennsylvania Academy/PCA Cooperative Program 

Artists for Environment Program 
Curricular Requirements 

Credit Distribution 

Full-time Status 

Credit Hour Ratio 

Change of Major 

Residence Requirement and Transfer Credit 

Advisors 

Departmental Function 
Academic Regulations 

Readmission 

Return-degree Candidacy 

Terms of Enrollment 

Class Attendance 

Grading System 

Graduation Requirements 

Withdrawal 

Dismissal .; 

General Information 

Accreditation 

Schedule of Semester Charges and Fees 

Annual Undergraduate Expenses 

Financial Responsibility 

Financial Aid — Enrolled and Former Students 

Social Regulations 

Student Work 

College Liability 

Civil Rights Compliance 
Facilities 

Instructional Workshops 

Library 

Audio-Visual Center , 

College Store 

Health Service 

Meal Service 

Housing 

Career Development and Placement Office 

Student Activities 
Calendar 1977-1978 ' 

Board of Trustees 
Administration 1977-1978 
Faculty 1977-1978 



\^ 



•^^r 



Instructional Departments 



A note on the system of numbering courses: 

Courses are numbered to indicate tlie initial year 
level in which they may be rostered. Correspond- 
ences are as follows: freshmen may take 100 series 
courses; sophomores, the 200 series; juniors, the 
300 series and seniors, the 400 series. Courses listed 
as 200-300 will admit sophomore and juniors; the 
300-400 level series may be taken by juniors and 
seniors. Courses at the 400-500 level are restricted 
to seniors and graduate students. For these courses, 
additional work is always required when taken for 
graduate credit. 



57 



Foundation Program 



Freshmen are required to roster FP 100, 
120 and 190 in the fall and spring 
semesters for a total of 9 credits each 
semester. In addition, students may 
choose one of a number of electives 
offered by the major departments. Elec- 
tives are 1 .5 credits per course and a 
complete list of those available to fresh- 
men will be issued each semester prior 
to registration. 

Six hours of liberal arts credits should 
be included each semester. Students are 
urged to take courses in their first year 
covering the language and literature and 
art history distribution requirements. 



Foundation Program 
Electives 

Ceramics 

Drawing 

Environmental Design 

Fibers 

Graphic Design 

Illustration 

Industrial Design 

Jewelry/Metal 

Kinetics 

Painting 

Photography 

Printmaking 

Sculpture 

Woodworking 



f 



FP100 

Drawing 

6 hours a week 

Semester credits: 3 3 

The student is involved with perceptual 

and conceptual drawing. The course is 

intended to acquaint students with 

materials and procedures which facilitate 

seeing and promote appropriate recording 

of visual information. 

FP120 
2-D Design 
6 hours a week 

Semester credits: 3 3 

Working with shape, light/color and 
texture in a variety of media, the student 
gains an understanding of the interaction 
of these elements in the formation of 
coherent patterns and spatial illusion. 

FP190 
3-D Design 
6 hours a week 

Semester credits: 3 3 

The student explores the physical and 
visual properties of three dimensional 
media. Skills in working materials are 
employed in projects dealing with utility, 
perception and the organization of space. 



Core Studies Credits 1 8 

Studio Elective Credits 3 

Liberal Arts Credits 6-12 

Minimum Foundation Year 
Credits 27-33 



58 



(f=fall; s = spring; 



Craft 



Required: 

Cr215. Ideation Studies 

Ceramic concentration requires 6 credits 

of Plaster Workshop. Fibers Concentration 

requires 9 credits of Drawing, 1 .5 credits 

of Color TIneory. 



Sophomore 



Sophomores roster 6 credits 
each in two of the 
following craft studios; 

Cr211 

Soptiomore Craft: Ceramics 

6 flours, once a week 

Semester credits: 3 3 

The basic concepts and techniques 

of ceramics. 

Or 21 2 

Soptiomore Craft: Metats 

6 hours, once a weel< 

Semester credits: 3 3 

An introduction to the fundamental 

techniques of metalworking. 

Or 21 3 

Soptiomore Craft: Wood 

6 hours, once a weett 

Semester credits: 3 3 

An examination of design properties 

in wood; development of basic hand 

and machine tool operation. 

Cr214 

Sophomore Craft: Fibers 
6 hours, once a weel< 
Semester credits: 3 3 

Materials and fibers are explored through 
a series of developmental assignments; 
rug and tapestry techniques are introduced 
and the student becomes familiar with the 
working of a loom through exercises. 
Off-loom techniques as well are explored; 
dyeing techniques and the reactions of 
various fibers to dye are included. Felting 
processes in addition to basic techniques 
for surface treatment of fabric to include 
batik, tie-dye, block print, and silk screen 
through a series of design problems 
emphasizing the creative aspects of 
the media. 



Major Department Credits 45 
Other Required Credits 0-9 

Remaining Related Arts 13-22 
Remaining Liberal Arts 45 

Foundation Program 18 

Total Credits for BFA 130 



Cr215 

Sophomore Craft: 

Ideation Studies 

3 hours, once a weel< 

Semester credits: 1.5 

A two-part course in the study of visual 

communication techniques and the 

investigation and manipulation of 

formal ideas. 



Required by respective areas: 
Cr 317, 318, 319, 320 



Junior 



Cr317 

Fibers History 
3 hours, once a week 
Semester credits: 1.5 1.5 

Two semester seminar survey of fiber 
design concepts and styles, including the 
following cultures: Coptic, Peruvian, Silk- 
Chinese and Japanese, Egyptian and 
Sassanean Textiles, Byzantine and 
Islamic, Iranian and Turkish. Indian and 
Indonesian, Spanish, Italian, French, Eng- 
lish, and American Twentieth Century. 

Cr318 

Metals/ Materials Technology 
3 hours, once a week 
Semester credits: 7.5 1.5 

A lab, lecture and demonstration course 
investigating the theoretical, practical and 
physical properties of metals and other 
materials as they relate to methods of 
construction, forming, and finishing. 
Maintenance of related tools and equip- 
ment will be studied. 

Cr319 

Wood Technology 
3 hours, once a week 
Semester credits: 1.5 1.5 

A laboratory course to investigate the 
properties of wood and the processes 
necessary to its fabrication. Through ex- 
periments, demonstrations and lectures, 
woods, laminations, glues, joints and the 
theory and maintenance of related tools 
and machinery will be studied. 

Cr320 

Clay/ Glaze Technology 

3 hours, once a week 
Semester credits: 1.5 1.5 

A lab and lecture course to investigate 
the theoretical and practical aspects of 
clays and clay body composition, and 
glaze formulation and application. All 
temperature ranges and firing processes 
will be investigated in addition to other 
means of finishing clay surfaces. Kiln 
construction and maintenance studied. 



7.5 7.5 



7.5 7.5 



59 



Required: 

Cr415, Cr all Seminar 



Senior 



Cr4n, 412, 413 
Senior Crafts: 
Ceramics. Metals, Wood 
6 hours, twice a week 
Semester credits: 6 6 

The intensive worl< in personal develop- 
ment is handled on a one-to-one basis 
with the instructor. The guidance offered 
affirms the student's development as a 
distinct and creative person. 

Cr414 

Senior Craft: Fibers 
6 hours, twice a weet< 
Semester credits: 6 6 

Suitably complex problems based on the 
knowledge and experience acquired in 
previous years with further investigation 
into specific techniques for special 
projects. Emphasis is placed on self- 
development and structuring of personal 
assignments. A more concentrated study 
program of the tools of industry which will 
help equip the student for problems 
encountered on a studio or industrial level, 
through field trips, lectures, etc. 

In addition there is a seminar in Fabric 
History, dealing with aesthetics, style, and 
technology of textiles as related to the 
cultural, economic and sociological 
history of the world. A study of the 
development of the loom. Research is 
emphasized as a tool for the fabric 
designer in the area of derivative design. 
The course is illustrated by slides and 
original fabrics from the departmental 
Textile Study Reference Collection and, 
whenever possible, from private and 
museum collections. 

Cr415 

Senior Craft: 

Craft Seminar 

3 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: 1.5 1.5 

A forum for the discussion of ideas and 

issues of concern to students for crafts, 

through student participation, guest 

lecturers, professional offerings; a study 

of style and the survival techniques of 

contemporaries working in craft media 

will be emphasized. 



Addition to Departmental Offering: 
The Crafts Department also offers Related 
Arts courses in Glass Working and 
Plaster Workmanship. 



60 



(f=fall; s = spnng) 



Environmental Design 



Required: 

En 202 

Structure & Construction 

Sophomore 



En 210 

Basic Design 

3 liours, tliree times a weel< 

Semester credits: 4.5 — 

Exploration of function, space, movement, 

color, texture and light as it applies to 

small environments such as rooms, 

exhibits and shelters. 

En 211 

Residentiai Space 

3 hours, tliree times a weel^ 

Semester credits: — 4.5 

Examination of social, psychological, 

functional and spatial needs of living 

space and the design of environments 

including apartments and houses. 

En 212 

Alternate Energy 
3 hours, once a week 
Semester credits: 1 .5 — 

Projects focusing on micro climate and 
technologies useful in the design of a 
"natural" man-made environment. 
Seminar on solar heating with visits to 
solar houses designed by the faculty 
and visiting lecturers. 

En 213 

Ecological Design 
3 hours, once a week 
Semester credits: — 1.5 

Projects to understand the relationship 
between the natural systems and the 
man-made environment; subjects include: 
pollution, environmental impact studies, 
site planning and macro climate. 

En 214 

Skills I — D ratting 

3 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: 1.5 1.5 

Exercises in architectural lettering, 

symbols, measured drawings, isometric 

drawings, perspectives, drawings as 

instructions, and principles of detailing. 

Second semester includes seminar in 

computer graphics. 



Major Department Credits 45 

Other Required Credits 9 

Remaining Related Arts 13 

Liberal Arts 45 

Foundation Program 18 



7.5 7.5 



Required: 

En 301 

Environmental Psychology 

Junior 



En 310 

Commercial Space 
3 hours, three times a week 
Semester credits: 4.5 — 

Major studio problems examining com- 
mercial environments, including offices 
and stores. Problems given at several 
scales: interiors, architecture, and 
planning. Instruction in the use of building 
and zoning codes. 

En 311 

Institutional Environments 

3 hours, three times a week 

Semester credits: — 4.5 

Studio problems emphasizing institutional 

design, working on a unique problem for 

the physically and mentally disabled. 

Emphasis on programming, data 

gathering, group research. 

En 312 

Environmental Graphics 
3 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: 1.5 1.5 

Design and structuring of typographical 
and symbolic information in three dimen- 
sional situations. Study of letterforms and 
signage applications in transportation, 
merchandising and health care facilities. 

En 314 

Skills II — Models 

3 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: 1.5 — 

Instruction and exposure to the various 

methods employed in model making for 

both study and finished models. 

Development of the ability to use the 

model as an efficient, creative design tool. 

En 315 

Skills II — Rendering 

3 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: — 1.5 

Instruction in the use of various media 

to communicate design ideas. Emphasis 

is placed on use of rendering as a 

design tool as well as method of 

presentation to clients. 



Required: 

En 401 

Experimental Environments 

Senior 



En 410 

Housing 

3 hours, three times a week 

Semester credits: 4.5 — 

Advanced design of housing and related 

uses from the scale of the neighborhood 

to the scale of the unit. Work with 

community groups and city agencies. One 

component of the problem involves 

historical preservation and its relationship 

to new construction. 

En 411 

Thesis 

3 hours, three times a week 

Semester credits: — 4.5 

Opportunity for students to pursue a 

design project in the field of their choice. 

Thesis topic, description, method of 

evaluation must be approved by faculty 

before commencement of spring term. 

En 412 

Community Design 
3 hours, once a week 
Semester credits: — 7.5 

Design projects for better understanding 
of community needs and improvements, 
and the processes by which the designer 
functions in an agency or as an ad-hoc 
member of the community. Basic 
understanding of city planning methods 
and terminology. 

En 413 

Landscape Design 
3 hours, once a week 
Semester credits: 1.5 — 

Design problems given in land develop- 
ment and re-use, playground and park 
design and urban gardens. Field trips to 
study plant materials and environmental 
systems. 

En 414 

Skills III — Working Drawings 

3 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: 1.5 1.5 

Instruction in and the production of a 

complete set of documents for 

construction, including working drawings. 

contracts and specifications. 



7.5 7.5 



7.5 7.5 



61 



Graphic Design 



Senior 



Sophomore 



f 



GD210 

Designs: Letterforms, Symbols 
6 hours, once a week 
Semester credits: 3 3 

An understanding of major liistorical type 
styles developed through comparative 
perceptual studies. Includes spontaneous 
lettering, constructed alphabets, and 
invented signs. The second semester 
includes an introduction to typography. 

GD211 

Drawing 1 

6 hours, once a week 

Semester credits 3 3 

Observation and drawing analysis of 

simple objects. 

Second semester introduction to figure 

drawing. 

GD213 
Basic Design 
6 hours, once a week 
Semester credits: 3 3 

Developing diverse approaches to solving 
design and simple communications 
problems. Serial techniques for the devel- 
opment and evaluation of design solutions. 

GD224 

Graphic Design History 

1 hour, once a week 

Semester credits: — .5 

A study of the evolution of graphic design 

and its influences from the industrial 

revolution to the present. 



Junior 



GD306 

Lab A: Typography Emphasis 

6 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: 3 — 

Study of the organization and design of 

verbal information in relation to other 

graphic elements. 

GD310 

Lab B: Photo Emphasis 
6 hours, once a week 
Semester credits: 3 — 

The refinement of photographic tech- 
niques and visualization for use in 
communications design. 

GD311 

Lab C: Communications 
6 hours, once a week 
Semester credits: 3 — 

Elementary communications problems 
including research. Synthesis of typo- 
graphic-illustrative content. 



GD406 

Lab A: Media Emphasis 

6 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: 3 — 

An advanced course with emphasis on 

complex, inventive typo-photographic 

image-making. 

GD411 

Lab B: Applied Identity Programs 

6 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: 3 — 

The application of programmatic studies 

to solve problems of identification of a 

firm or organization as required in a 

variety of specific situations of space, 

scale, and material. 

GD415 

Production Seminar 

2 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: 1 — 

Forum to familiarize the student with the 

technical aspects of graphic reproduction, 

services, and processes and their 

specification. 

GD421 

Lab C: Problem Solving 
6 hours, once a week 
Semester credits: 3 — 

Developing approaches to solving com- 
munications problems of diverse 
character. Increasingly practical appli- 
cation. Emphasis on developing multiple 
responses to problems. 



Departmental electives 
from current offerings 



Departmental Electives 
from current offerings 



— 9 



Major Department Credits 37.5 

Other Required Credits 16.5 

Remaining Related Arts 13 

Remaining Liberal Arts 45 

Foundation Program 18 



9.5 



130 



62 



(f=fall; s = spring) 



Graphic Design 
Department Electives 

The following GD elective courses are 
primarily for junior and senior students 
within the department. They are open to 
students from other major departments on 
a space-available basis. Courses will 
be taught only if demand warrants. 

GD201 

Basic Typography 

3 hours, once a week 

Island 2nd semesters, 1 .5 credits 

An introduction to the basic typographic 

organization and composition. Emphasis 

on the technical generation of type and 

reproduction processes. 

GD306 

Typographies 

6 hours, once a weeli 

1st and 2nd semesters, 3 credits 

Typographic manipulation as the primary 

means of solving problems of 

communication. 

GD307 

Experimental Typo-Photo 

3 hours, once a weel< 

2nd semester, 1.5 credits 

Using typographic and photographic 

means to explore expressive possibilities 

of verbal-visual ideas. 

GD310 

Lab B: Photo Emphasis 
6 hours, once a week 
1st semester, 3 credits 
The refinement of photographic tech- 
niques and visualization for use in 
communications design. 

GD313 
Color Theory 
3 hours, once a week 
1st and 2nd semesters, 1.5 credits 
Extensive exploration of color relation- 
ships based on experiencing discrete 
intervals of value, chroma, and intensity. 
The influence of color and light environ- 
ment on color perception. 



GD314 

Drawing lor Graphic Processes 

3 hours, once a week 

2nd semester, 1.5 credits 

Observation and analysis of objects 

leading to formalized modes of drawing, 

taking into consideration processes of 

reproduction. 

GD322 
3D Graphics 
6 hours, once a week 
2nd semester, 3 credits 
The study of 3-D Graphics as a functional 
form of communication, e.g., the develop- 
ment of package as a container and 
communications mechanism in single and 
multiple units; design with light and 
materials in outdoor signs, etc. 

GD323 

Publications Design 
6 hours, once a week 
2nd semester, 3 credits 
Prerequisite: GD 207. The design of pub- 
lications, including content, image, 
sequence, production, material 
interrelationship. 

GD325 

Graphic Concepts 
6 hours, once a week 
2nd semester, 3 credits 
Practice in the development and applica- 
tion of texts and images for mass 
communications. 

GD326 

Single Image 

6 hours, once a week 

2nd semester, 3 credits 

The design of a complete publicity 

unit as exemplified in the poster. 

GD327 

Silkscreen Workshop 

3 hours, once a week 

2nd semester, 1.5 credits 

A study of the silkscreen reproduction 

process in conjunction with color 

experiments. 

GD328 

Environmental Graphics 

6 hours, once a week 

2nd semester, 3 credits 

The integration of graphic elements in 

larger environments such as an exhibition. 



GD330 

Photographies II 

6 hours, once a week 

2nd semester, 3 credits 

a) Conversion of photographs to more 

graphic forms, or b) the photographic 

manipulation of graphic forms. 

GD411 

Visual Identity Programs 

6 hours, once a week 

2nd semester, 3 credits 

The application of programmatic studies 

to solve problems of identification of a 

firm or organization as required in a 

variety of specific situations of space, 

scale, and material. 

GD431 

Portlolio Workshop 

3 hours, once a week 

2nd semester, 7.5 credits 

Provides a regular meeting time with 

faculty on a rotating basis to organize and 

refine student projects for personal 

portfolio presentation. Seniors in Graphic 

Design only. 

GD424 

Thesis 

3 hours, once a week 

1st or 2nd semester, 1.5 credits 

An elective which requires the submission 

of an exact brief detailing the nature of an 

independently conducted study directly 

related to studies in communication: 

purpose, media, timetable, choice of 

faculty advisors, etc. Program must be 

submitted during the first full week of 

semester and approved by joint faculty. 



63 



Illustration 



Sophomore 



11210 

Visual Foundations 

6 liours. once a week 

Semester credits: 3 3 

Emphasis on visual and conceptual 

perception, drawing, general technical 

facility and aesthetic awareness. Studio 

work is complemented by lectures on 

classical and contemporary art history. 

11211 

Design I 

6 liours, once a weel< 

Semester credits: 3 or 3 

A process-oriented study of basic 

materials and tools, design systems, and 

color. Appropriate work habits, and the 

development of procedures for problem 

solving are emphasized. 

11212 

Primary Printing Media 

6 tiours, once a weel< 

Semester credits: 3 or 3 

Printing from typographic and pictorial 

relief surfaces. Media includes hand-set 

type, woodcut, linoleum-cut, wood 

engraving and constructed printing 

surfaces. Formats include small folio's 

and individual experimental pieces. 

11213 

Figure Utilization 
3 liours. once a weel< 

Semester credits: 7.5 or 1.5 

Drawing from the figure emphasizing 
form/space considerations, the figure in 
relation to its format, multi-figure composi- 
tions, and emotive qualities of the figure. 
Studies and assignments include analy- 
tical as well as interpretive emphases. 



Major Department Credits 
Other Required Credits 
Remaining Related Arts 
Remaining Liberal Arts 
Foundation Program 



1.5 

17.5 

45 

18 

130 



11214 

Color Theory 
3 liours, once a week 
Semester credits: 1.5 or 1.5 

The influence of color interaction on color 
perception and color symbolism. Empha- 
sis on pigment mixing and the control of 
intervals of value, chroma, and intensity. 

11215 

Perspective 
3 hours, once a week 
Semester credits: 1.5 or 1 .5 

Perspective has been described as "the 
rationalization of sight." This class em- 
phasizes linear, measured perspective. 
Parallel, angular, and three-point systems 
of object analysis are explored as tech- 
niques useful in themselves but, more 
important, as a means of teaching 
"how we see what we see." 

11216 

Illustration Forum 

2 hours, alternate weeks 

Semester credits: .5 .5 

Visiting lectures, symposia, guest 

critics, departmental discussions. 



Required: 

PF208 

Basic Photography 

Junior 



11310 

Illustration I 

6 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: 3 3 

Development of specific skills useful to 

illustrators, i.e. evocative figures and 

heads, portraiture, interior and exterior 

figure/environment compositions, usage 

of photographic and staged material. 

Studio work complemented by lectures on 

historical and contemporary illustration. 



11311 

Design II 

3 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: 1.5 

1 st semester: Focus on image and 

typography as they relate to the poster 

format. Concepts of the "poster" includes 

informational, decorative, individual, 

multiple, small and large. 

2nd semester: Considerations with 

sequential formats. Potential areas of 

inquiry includes brochures, direct-mail 

pieces, simple animations, slide 

presentations, multi-page spreads, and 

experimental time/sequence formats. 



7.5 



11312 

Production 

6 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: 3 or 3 

Clarification of the photo-reproduction 

process, varying printing techniques. 

photo-typography, type-specking, color 

separation, printing papers, graphic arts 

materials. The typography facility is 

utilized to emphasize the reproduction 

process. 



9.5 8 



64 



{f = fall; s = spring) 



Seniors 



11410 

Illustration II 

6 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: 3 3 

Assignments revolve around specific areas 

of illustration — advertising, book, 

documentary, editorial and institutional. 

Emptiasis is on solutions both practical 

and relevant to professional needs and 

demands. 



11313 

Materials and Techniques 

6 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: 3 or 3 

Workshop in classical and contemporary 

media and techniques. Areas of study 

include grounds and supports as well as a 

variety of drawing and painting media. 

Home assignments and slide lectures 

supplement the workshop activity. 

11316 

Illustration Forum 

2 hours, alternate weeks 

Semester credits: .5 .5 

Same as II 216. 



11411 
Design III 

6 hours, once a week 
Semester credits: 3 3 

The areas of advertising, book, 
documentary, editorial and institutional 
serve, as well, as organization for this 
course. Assignments encourage simplifi- 
cation and refinement of typographic and 
pictorial elements. Literal directness and 
clear visual quality, rather than complex 
concept, are stressed. 

11412 

Portfolio Seminar 
3 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: — 1-5 

Development of a graduate portfolio 
geared towards the individual abilities and 
professional goals of the student. As well 
as an inventory of past assignments, 
and suggestions for complementary ones, 
visits from practicing professionals help to 
give a perspective on the artistic and busi- 
ness demands likely to be encountered. 

11416 

Illustration Forum 

2 hours, alternate weeks 

Semester credits: .5 .5 

Same as II 216. 

ai 8 



65 



Industrial Design 



Required: 

LA 284 

Applied Psychology of Design 

ID 305 

Visual Techniques 

ID 307 

Industrial Materials and Processes 



Required: 

ID 213 

Materials and Fabrication Techniques 



Sophomore 



ID 201 

Plaster Workshop 

3 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: 1.5 1.5 

Training of the designer in the use of 

plaster as a means of generating forms. 

Techniques of plaster turning, mold 

making, and casting procedures in 

plaster, plastics and bronze are studied. 

ID 203 

Engineering Graphics 
3 hours, once a week 
1st or 2nd semester, 1.5 1.5 

A course in which freehand and mechani- 
cal conventions of descriptive drawing 
are studied. Orthographic and isometric 
projections, sections and perspective 
systems are of central concern. 

ID 211 

Graphic Application 

3 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: 1.5 1.5 

A study of the principles of graphic 

organization, letterforms, and symbols. 



ID 214 

Basic Science and Engineering 
3 hours, once a week 
Semester credits: 1.5 1.5 

The science of physics and engineering 
explained in theory and applied in the 
construction of three-dimensional struc- 
tures which clearly illustrate a close 
relationship between the sciences and 
the arts. Structures involving mechanics 
in motion, light, color, electricity and 
magnetism emphasize the relation of form 
and function giving the student funda- 
mental concepts on which he may build 
a design philosophy. 

ID 216 

3-D Design Studio 

3 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: 1.5 1.5 

A study of the theoretical aspects of form 

and structure are combined with studio 

practice in problem-solving through the 

design of elementary products such as 

toys and hand tools. 



Recommended: 

LA 181 AandB 

Introduction to Psychology 

LA 385 

Social Psychology 

Junior 



f 



ID 310 

Design Studio 

6 hours, once a week 

3 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: 4.5 4.5 

A study of Design methodology related to 

designing for mass production. Most 

projects are conducted with the help of 

consultants from industry. Problems are 

given in product design, packaging, 

exhibition design, transportation design. 

ID 311 

Design Seminar 

3 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: 7.5 7.5 

A forum for the discussion and study of 

current ideas within the design field. 

Presentations made by the staff and 

guest lecturers. 

ID 320 

Graphic Design 

3 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: 1.5 1.5 

Workshop in the structuring of visual 

and typographic information. 



Major Department Credits 45 

Other Required Credits 12 

Remaining Related Arts 13 

Remaining Liberal Arts 42 

Foundation Program 18 



7.5 7.5 



66 



(f=fall: s = spring) 



Senior f s 

ID 410 

Industrial Design 
6 hours, once a weel< 
3 hours, once a weel<: 
Semester credits: 4.5 4.5 

The first semester is devoted to the solu- 
tion of design problems offered by 
selected industries and is a continuation 
of ID 310. The second semester provides 
the student with an opportunity to worl< 
on a 12-week problem: lime is divided 
between research, thematic development, 
design, and presentation. 

ID 411 

Industrial Design Seminar 

3 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: 1.5 1.5 

A forum for the discussion and study of 

current ideas within the design field. 

Presentations made by the staff and guest 

speakers. The course requires a term 

paper concerned with the issues 

considered. 

ID 412 

Portlollo Preparation 

3 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: 1.5 1.5 

Instruction and guidance in the 

preparation of a professional portfolio. 

7.5 7.5 



67 



Painting and Drawing 



Sophomore 



Pt212 

Beginning Painting 
9 hours a wee/c 

Semester credits: 4.5 4.5 

Studio course with emphasis on percep- 
tual disciplines and the rudiments of 
pictorial organization. 

Dr212 

Beginning Drawing 

3 hours, twice a weel< 

Semester credits: 3 3 

Studio course which initiates the student 

into the problems basic to the drawing 

medium. 

Dr211 

Drawing Problems 

3 hours, once a weeli 

Semester credits: 1.5 1.5 

Further investigations into drawing 

on a more abstract level. 

Ptd 215 

Media and Techniques 
3 hours, once a weei< 
Semester credits: 1.5 1.5 

A lecture course (with student participa- 
tion) in the basic materials of the painter 
and draftsman. Old and new methods 
and materials are studied. Visits to 
museum curators, art conservationists and 
frame-makers, and lectures by the same, 
will stress the problems in caring and 
preserving works of art. 

Ptd 216 

Painting Practices 
3 hours, once a weei< 
Semester credits: 1 .5 or 1 .5 

Studio and lecture course dealing with 
the psychological and historical investi- 
gations into the complexities of percep- 
tion, color, and pictorial ordering, etc. 



Juniors are required to roster 
Pt 314, Pt 333 each semester, Pt 321 
and Pt 315 one semester only, as well as 
a choice of Pt 312, Pt 313, Pt311 for one 
semester only. 



Junior 



f 



Pt314 

Intermediate Painting 

9 hours a week 

Semester credits: 4.5 4.5 

Studio classes dealing with perceptual 

and conceptual problems. A more 

individualized approach is stressed. 

Pt333 

Tutorial 1.5 1.5 

3 hours a week 

A 11/2 credit per semester Tutorial 

arrangement for Junior Painting Students, 

with Tutors selected by students. The 

student-teacher ratio is 12-1 at maximum, 

and specific arrangements for meeting 

are established between the Tutor and 

the student. 

Pt321 

The Artist and Society 
2 hours, once a week 
Semester credits: 1.5 or 1.5 

Biweekly lectures with guest artists and 
people from related areas, alternating with 
class seminars, which include discus- 
sions of the previous lecturers. 

Ptg315 

Art Theories 

Semester credits: 1 .5 or 1 .5 

A lecture class dealing with the nature 

and effect of various aesthetic theories. 

(This course not offered 1977-1978) 



Pt311 

Advanced Drawing Problems 

3 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: 1.5 or 1.5 

This course is designed to stress the 

student's concerns to develop an image 

through the interpretation and analysis of 

drawing problems. 

Pt312 

Anatomy and the Figure 
3 hours, once a week 
Semester credits: 1 .5 or 7.5 

This course gives the student the oppor- 
tunity to investigate the varied strategies 
for drawing the human figure — its 
skeletal and muscular interaction and its 
basic positions — and the establishment 
of that figure in a context of light and color. 

Pt313 

Mixed Media 
3 hours, once a week 
Semester credits: 1.5 or 1.5 

Problems are given which investigate the 
collage/assemblage aesthetic. Emphasis 
is placed on finding the appropriate 
medium(s) for each student's individual 
response to problems. It offers an area 
where sculpture, painting, printmaking, 
photography, and the use of found objects 
can combine and overlap freely. 
Assistance concerns aesthetic evaluations 
rather than technical information. 



Major Department Credits 54 

Remaining Related Arts 13 

Remaining Liberal Arts 45 

Foundation Program 18 



12 or 10.5 
10.5 or 12 



9 or 7.5 
7.5 or 9 



68 



(f=fall; s = spring) 



Senior f s 

Ptg412 

Advanced Painting 
9 hours a weeii 

Semester credits: 4.5 4.5 

Studio emphasis is on the development 
of personal and imaginative statements 
and development of clarification of stu- 
dent's intent. The student is expected to 
exercise initiative and discipline towards 
the production of a sustained body of 
consistent work. Spring semester may be 
devoted to a Senior Painting Project. 

Ptg 444 

Tutorial 1.5 1.5 

3 tiours a weel< 

A 1 Vz credit per semester Tutorial 

arrangement for Senior Painting Students, 

with Tutors selected by students. The 

student-teacher ratio is 12-1 at maximum, 

and specific arrangements for meeting 

are established between the Tutor and 

the student. 

DM72 

Advanced Drawing 
3 hours, once a wee/( 
Semester credits: 1 .5 or 1 .5 

The purpose of the course is twofold; 
it attempts to examine drawing as an 
independent discipline, and drawing as 
an informing structure in painting. 

Ptd 422 

Senior Seminar 

2 hours, once a weel< 

Semester credits: 1.5 or 1.5 

An open-ended senior seminar dealing 

with various aesthetic questions which are 

felt to be pertinent to the student's needs. 

Occasional field trips and guest speakers. 

7.5 or 7.5 



69 



Photography and Film 



Photography 



Required: 

All sophomores are required to roster 

LA 343. History of Photography, and 

LA 148A, Introduction to the Film: History 

and Understanding ol the Medium, in the 

fall semester for a total of 6 credits; 

continuation in the spring semester is 

optional. 



Sophomore 



Sophomore Photography majors 
are required to roster 
PF211AandB, PF215, PF217, 
and either PF 21 OA and B or 
PF214. 



PF211A 

Introduction to Photography I 
6 hours, once a week 
Semester credits: 3 — 

Introduction to basic concepts, processes, 
and techniques of photography including 
camera usage, exposure, darl<room pro- 
cedures, lighting , and their controlled 
applications. Required for admission to 
photography courses above PF 211 . 

PF211B 

Introduction to Photography II 
6 hours, once a week 
Semester credits — 3 

Production and criticism aimed at achiev- 
ing mastery of basic black and white 
techniques, pursuing particular problems 
relating to photographic visualization and 
individual growth in the medium. 

PF215 
Photo Media 
3 hours, once a week 
Semester credits: — 7.5 

A non-production course acquainting 
students with less traditional black-and- 
white materials through experimentation 
with films, papers, and chemistry, and 
with basic functions of color in photog- 
raphy and film through practical work 
with color transparency materials. 



Junior 



f 



PF210A 

Introduction to Filmmaking I 

6 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: 3 — 

An introduction to the mechanics and 

techniques of silent filmmaking and 

rudiments of editing. 

PF210B 

Introduction to Filmmaking II 
6 hours, once a week 
Semester credits: — 3 

Continuation of PF 210A with emphasis on 
the principles of shooting and composi- 
tion, the logic of arrangement, image and 
time manipulations, multiple projections, 
and an introduction to sound recording. 



or 



PF214 

Introduction to Video 

6 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: — 3 

Introduction and exploration of the 

technology and applications of electronic 

imaging systems. 



PF311 

Multimedia Workshop 
6 hours, once a week 
Semester credits: 3 — 

Deals with the conceptual problems of 
interrelating sound and the projected 
image toward an expressive work. Intro- 
duction to projector usage and controls 
and sound equipment set up and usage. 

PF313 

Studio Workshop 

6 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: — 3 

Intensive practice of studio techniques, 

with emphasis on controlled lighting, large 

and small scale set-ups, view camera 

usage with both color and black/while 

materials. 

PF315 

Junior Workshop 

6 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: — 3 

Exploration of photographic imagery 

through a series of problems aimed at 

personal vision and creative growth. 

Departmental eiectives from 

current offerings: 4.5 3 



Major Department Credits 
Other Required Credits 
Remaining Related Arts 
Remaining Liberal Arts 
Foundation Program 



48 
6 
19 
39 
18 

130 



70 



(f=fall; s = sprjng) 



Photography and 
Film Department 
Electives 

The following PF elective courses are 
primarily for junior and senior students 
witfiin the department. They are open to 
students from other major departments 
on a space-available basis. Courses will 
be taught only if demand warrants. 



Senior 



PF411 

Senior Workshop 
6 hours, once a week 
Semester credits: 3 3 

Continuation of Junior Workshop; work on 
long-term individual project or shorter- 
term problems to develop technical, 
aesthetic, and conceptual mastery of 
the medium. 

PF413 

Professional Practices 
3 hours, once a week 
Semester credits: 3 — 

Study of the practice of professional 
photography, with attention to various 
career opportunities, portfolio presenta- 
tion, business practices, professional 
ethics, photographic law, and personal 
objectives. A variety of professional guests 
visit the course. 

PF415 

Intermedia Communications 

3 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: — 3 

Theoretical considerations on the 

future interrelationships of photo media, 

technological advances and the needs 

of society. 

Departmental electives from 

current offerings: 1.5 3 



Photography and Film Major Electives: 

PF212 

Introduction to Animation 
6 hours, once a week 
1st or 2nd semester, 3 credits 
A workshop class covering basic theory, 
techniques, and practice of drawn, stop- 
action, and graphic animation. Students 
execute a series of assigned exercises 
and complete a short film using selected 
animation techniques. 

PF214 

Introduction to Video 

6 hours, once a week 

1st or 2nd semester. 3 credtis 

Introduction and exploration of the 

technology and applications of 

electronic imaging systems. 

PF312 

Animation Workshop 

6 hours, once a week 

1st or 2nd semester, 3 credits 

A continuation of PF 21 2B, with increased 

independence and emphasis on individual 

production of animated films, Ivlay be 

repeated. 

PF318 

Creative Sound 

3 hours, once a week 

1st or 2nd semester, 1.5 credits 

A course dealing with the production 

utilization and organization of sound as 

a medium unto itself. The classical studio 

techniques such as editing, tape over, 

and mixing will be explored as well as the 

use of the ARP 2600 electronic music 

synthesizer. The course deals with both 

production and history of recorded sound 

as an artistic endeavor. 



Photography Major Electives: 

PF317 

Color Printing Workshop 

6 hours, once a week 

1st or 2nd semester. 3 credits 

Introduction to traditional methods of 

color printing, leading to an exploration of 

the technical and creative possibilities 

of color in photography. 

PF319 

Large Format Photography 

3 hours, once a week 

1st or 2nd semester. 1.5 credits 

Production course using the 4" x 5" 

or 8" X 10" view camera, toward acquiring 

a mastery of the basic techniques and an 

understanding of the potentials of large 

format photography. Emphasis is placed 

on the use of the view camera outside 

of the studio. 

PF321 

Selected Topics 
3 hours, once a week 
1st or 2nd semester, 
1.5 credits (repeatable) 
Study of one or more various media, 
methods, or problems in still photography, 
to be offered according to the instructor's 
interests and students' requests. Pre- 
requisites; may vary with topic. 

PF323 

Selected Topics 
6 hours, once a week 
1st or 2nd semester. 3 credits 
Study of one or more various media, 
methods, or problems in still photography 
to be offered according to the instructor's 
interests and students' requests. Pre- 
requisites; may vary with topic. 

The following courses offered in other 
departments may be taken as 
Photography Major Electives: 
GD 307. Experimental Typo-Photo 
GD 310. Photographies I 
GD 330. Photographies II 
PR 308, Photo Media 



Film electives listed on the 
following page. 



71 



Film 

Persons wishing to concentrate in 
Animation should consult with the depart- 
ment chairperson to design individualized 
programs for the degree. 

Required: 

All sophomores are required to roster 

LA 343. History of Photography, and 

LA 148A, Introduction to the Film: History 

and Understanding ot the Medium, in the 

fall semester for a total of 6 credits; 

continuation in the spring semester is 

optional. 



Sophomore 



PF210A 

Introduction to Filmmaking I 

6 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: 3 — 

An introduction to the mechanics and 

techniques of silent filmmaking and 

rudiments of editing. 

PF210B 

Introduction to Filmmaking II 
6 hours, once a week 
Semester credits: — 3 

Continuation of PF 21 OA, with emphasis 
on the principles of shooting and com- 
position, the logic of arrangement, image 
and time manipulations, multiple 
projections, and an introduction to 
sound recording. 

PF211A 

Introduction to Photography I 

6 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: 3 — 

Introduction to basic concepts, processes, 

and techniques of photography including 

camera usage, exposure, dari<room 

procedures, lighting, and their controlled 

applications. 



PF211B 

Introduction to Photography II 

6 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: — 3 

Production and criticism aimed at 

achieving mastery of basic black and white 

techniques, pursuing particular problems 

relating to photographic visualization and 

individual growth in the medium. 

PF215 
Photo Media 
3 hours, once a week 
Semester credits: — 1.5 

A non-production course acquainting 
students with less traditional black-and- 
white materials through experimentation 
with films, papers, and chemistry, and 
with basic functions of color in photog- 
raphyand film through practical work 
with color transparency materials. 



Junior film majors are required to roster 
LA 312A, Creative Writing: Prose Drama 
and Filmscript, and either LA 248A, 
History ot Film I, or LA 249A, History of 
Film II, for a total of 6 credits in the 
fall semester; continuation in the spring 
is optional. 



Junior 



PF310 

Cinematography and 
Production Workshop 
9 hours a week 

Semester credits: 4.5 4.5 

Production techniques in actual filming 
situations; starting from the script, 
budgeting, script breakdown, etc. through 
editing to the finished release print. 
Students are required to serve as director, 
cameraperson, soundperson, grip, and 
propperson. 

PF 320A, 320B 

Sound Workshop 

3 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: 1.5 1.5 

Introduction to the application of sound 

in film, with instruction and practice 

in the use of sound recording equipment, 

mixers, sound transfer, editing and general 

techniques. During the second semester 

the student completes a sound track for a 

film in conjunction with Cinematography 

and Production Workshop. 

PF314 
Film Form 

6 hours, once a week 
Semester credits: 3 — 

A study of the aesthetics of cinema 
through an examination of the elements 
of film language and the modes of formal 
composition. Specifically, the course is 
a theoretical and practical inquiry into the 
way in which visual and aural elements 
of the film medium are used to explore 
and produce artistic meaning. 

Departmental electives from 

current offerings: — 3 



Major Department Credits 48 

Other Required Credits 1 2 

Remaining Related Arts 19 

Remaining Liberal Arts 33 

Foundation Program 18 



7.5 



72 



(f = fall; s = spring) 



Film Major Eleclives: 



Senior 



f 



Senior film majors may roster either 
PF410 or PF 412: those electing PF 412 
will enroll simultaneously in PF 999, 
Independent Project. 

PF410 

Cinematography and 

Production Workshop 

9 hours a week 

Semester credits: 4.5 4.5 

Continuation of PF310. 

Increased independence is required of 

senior majors. 



or 



PF412 

Filmmaking Seminar 
6 hours, once a week 
Semester credits: 3 3 

Screening and criticism of student work, 
together with selected films by inde- 
pendent and experimental filmmakers. 
Emphasis is on the personal film and 
animated films, in distinction from 
dramatic and documentary films. Intended 
to serve as a context for pursuing 
advanced independent production in 
film and animation. 



PF316 

Film Directing 

6 hours, once a week 

2nd semester, 3 credits 

Translation of film script into film reality, 

approached through study of narrative and 

dramatic continuity in selected films and 

through practical exercises in the 

problems of directing. 

PF412 

Filmmaking Seminar 
6 hours, once a week 
1st and 2nd semester, 3 credits 
Screening and criticism of student work, 
together with selected films by 
independent and experimental filmmakers. 
Emphasis is on the personal film and 
animated films, in distinction from 
dramatic and documentary film. Intended 
to serve as a context for pursuing 
advanced independent production in film 
and animation. Prerequisite: 
PF210BorPF212. 

PF417 

Protessional Practices: Film 

3 hours, once a week 

1st and 2nd semester, 7.5 credits 

PF499 

Practlcum 

3 or 6 hours arranged 

Isi or 2nd semester, 1.5-3 credits 

PF999 

Independent Project 

2 to 6 hours, arranged 

1st and 2nd semester, 1-3 credits 



PF415 

Intermedia Communications 

3 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: — 3 

Theoretical considerations on the future 

interrelationships of photo media; 

technological advances, and the needs 

of society. 

Departmental electives from 

current offerings. 3-4.5 0-7.5 

7.5 7.5 



73 



Printmaking 



Seniors 



Sophomore 



Juniors 



f 



f 



f 



Pr209 

Screenprinting I, II 

3 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: 1.5 1.5 

Investigation of conceptual and technical 

vocabulary of sill< screen and adaptability 

to almost unlimited number of uses. 

Pr210 

Relief Printing 

3 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: 1.5 — 

Concentration on basic techniques in 

traditional and contemporary relief 

printing involving wood, linoleum, 

cardboard, metal, plastics, etc. 

Pr211 

Book Design I, II 

3 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: 1.5 1.5 

Formulation of ideas combining pictorial 

visualizations with typographic statements 

and elements of binding, construction, 

and other means. Concentration in the 

first semester is on basic principles of 

design, quick but comprehensive visuals, 

introduction of materials. 

Pr212 
Intaglio I, II 
3 hours, once a week 
Semester credits: 1.5 1.5 

Development of intaglio etching tech- 
niques on various metals laying a broad 
basis for future extensions in this media. 

Pr213 

Creative Concepts I, II 

3 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: 1.5 1.5 

Development of ways and means for 

concept, growth, and resolution of visual 

ideas in some tangible form. 

Pr215 

Lithography I 

3 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: — 1,5 

Introduction to aluminum plate lithography 

as one of the most autographic medias 

requiring a great deal of dependence on 

practical experience. 



Pr311 

Book Design III, IV 

3 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: 1.5 1.5 

Extension of experience in forming ideas 

for combination of images derived from 

printmaking activity with typographic 

information. 

Pr312 

Intaglio III, IV 

3 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: 1.5 1.5 

Intaglio etching techniques broadened 

and refined. Stress is on their operational 

and most effective use. 

Pr313 

Creative Concepts II, III 
3 hours, once a week 
Semester credits: 1.5 1.5 

Discussions, evaluations and analysis of 
ideas in their early conceptual state 
aiming at clarification of goals, improve- 
ments in articulation and development 
of efficient means of notation. 

Pr314 

Screenprinting III, IV 

3 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: 1.5 1.5 

Expansion of conceptual and technical 

abilities in this versatile media. 

Pr315 

Print Study Seminar I, II 
3 hours, alternate weeks 
Semester credits: 1.5 1.5 

Study and discussion of original prints 
and rare books from masters of the 15th 
through the 20th centuries. The course 
is conducted at Alverthorpe Gallery in 
Jenkintown (Rosenwald Collection of the 
National Collection of Fine Arts and 
Library of Congress) and at the 
Philadelphia Museum of Art. 

Pr316 

Lithography II, III 

3 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: 1.5 1.5 

Introduction to lithography on stone and 

a further exploration of technical and 

esthetic possibilities of lithography. 



'Pr410 
Screenprinting Workshop I, II 
3 hours, once a week 
Semester credits: 1.5 1.5 

Further improvements of both technical 
know-how and conceptual efficiency in 
silk screen printing. 

Pr412 

Thesis Seminar I, II 
3 hours, once a week 
Semester credits: 1.5 1.5 

Acquisition of a professional profile: 
portfolio preparation, resume, profes- 
sional exhibition participation, checks on 
work in progress. Central concern: 
"Thesis" embodying pregraduation work. 

Pr413 

Contract Edition I, II 
(optional) 

3 hours, once a week 
Semester credits: 1.5 1.5 

Involvement in the technology and expe- 
rience of printing limited editions. 

•P/-474 
Intaglio Workshop I, II 
3 hours, once a week 
Semester credits: 1.5 1.5 

Refinement of skills and esthetic judg- 
ments as well as development of 
professional practices. 

'Pr416A 
Lithography IV 
3 hours, once a week 
Semester credits: 1.5 — 

An exploration of limits of technical 
and esthetic possibilities of lithography 
with emphasis on problems in color 
and edition printing. 

'Pr416B 
Lithography Workshop I, II 
3 hours, once a week 
Semester credits: 1.5 1.5 

Professional practices in lithography with 
stress on controls and quality. 

*A senior may choose to concentrate on 
only one media, with approval and 
supervision of the respective faculty. This 
kind of commitment, however, demands 
a higher level of performance. 



Major Department Credits 42 

Remaining Related Arts 25 

Remaining Liberal Arts 45 

Foundation Program 18 



7.5 7.5 



7.5-9 7.5-9 



74 



(f=fall; s = spring) 



Sculpture 



Required: 

LA 250 A & B, History of Contemporary 

Sculpture, 6 credits. 

All sophomore sculpture majors are 

required to take So 210, 211, 212, 213, 

214. Non-majors expecting to take 

advanced level sculpture courses as 

electives are advised to take Sc 210 and 

211. Students interested in advanced 

figurative sculpture are advised to 

take Sc 212. 



Sophomore 



Sc210 

Materials and Processes 

3 hours, twice a week 

Semester credits: 3 3 

A workshop course utilizing lectures and 

problems investigating the uses and 

properties of primary materials and the 

processes associated wUh the forming of 

these materials. 

Sc211 

Non-Figurative Sculpture 
3 hours, twice a week 
Semester credits: 3 3 

An analysis through studio experience of 
the various uses and meanings of form in 
the major sculptural movements of the 
20th Century. Offered in conjunction with 
LA 352. 

Sc212 

Representational Sculpture 

3 hours, twice a week 

Semester credits 3 3 

A studio course utilizing clay modeling 

as the predominate means to record and 

relate information acquired from direct 

observation of the figure, still life, 

and other subject matter. 

Prerequisite to all 300 level figurative 

courses. 



Major Department Credits 39 

Other Required Credits 9 

Remaining Related Arts 25 

Remaining Liberal Arts 39 

Foundation Program 18 



Sc273 

Plaster Workshop 

3 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: 7.5 7.5 

Development of plaster working skills, 

model and mold making, leading to 

casting and forming in plastics, 

terracotta, and metals. 

Sc 214 

Theories of Structure 
3 hours, once a week 
Semester credits: 7.5 7.5 

Lecture and discussion of various con- 
cepts and philosophies of structure: 
mathematical, biological, linguistic, 
perceptual, etc., and their implications in 
relationship to the definition of art. 



72 



72 



Required: 

Junior majors are required to roster a 
minimum of 6 credits each semester in 
300 level sculpture courses. 



Junior 



Sc311 

Sculpture Studio I 
3 hours, twice a week 
Semester credits: 3 3 

Open studio course where specific 
problems are dealt with in conjunction 
with the particular interests of individual 
class members. Emphasis is placed on 
materials, their qualities, as well as the 
importance of and the imagination in 
the making of works of art. 

Sc312 

Structure ol the Figure 

6 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: 3 3 

A three-dimensional analysis of the 

human figure through lecture 

demonstration and studio application. 

Sc 313 

Figure Modeling 
6 hours, once a week 
Semester credits: 3 3 

Advanced work in clay from life models. 
No restrictions on size of figure or com- 
plexity of project undertaken, though 
faculty approval of all projects is required. 



Total Credits for BFA 



75 



Seniors are required to roster 
Sc 410 and a minimum of 1.5 additional 
credits each semester in 400 level 
sculpture courses. 



Senior 



f 



Sc314 

Studio II 

3 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: 7.5 1.5 

Open studio work periods intended to 

develop independent and personal 

programs of study in close association 

witfi faculty and advisors in the studio. 

Sc315 

Studio III 

3 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: 1.5 1.5 

Open studio work periods intended to 

develop independent and personal 

programs of study in close association 

with faculty and advisors in the studio. 

Sc316 

Forging 

6 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: 3 3 

Stresses a sculptural approach to a 

traditional craft. Basic iron working skills 

utilizing forging techniques. 



Sc410 

Senior Seminar 
3 hours, once a week 
Semester credits: 1.5 1.5 

Problems of contemporary sculpture be- 
ginning with the early 20th century 
through movements that have affected 
sculpture as we know it today. Special 
emphasis is on the examination of major 
sculpture exhibitions and their relation- 
ship to the concerns of the class. 

Sc411 

Sculpture Studio I 
3 hours, twice a week 
Semester credits: 3 3 

Open studio course where specific 
problems are dealt with in conjunction 
with the particular interests of individual 
class members. Emphasis is placed on 
materials, their qualities, as well as the 
importance of and the imagination in 
the making of works of art. 

Sc412 

Structure of the Figure 

6 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: 3 3 

A three-dimensional analysis of the 

human figure through lecture 

demonstration and studio application. 

Sc413 

Figure Modeling 
6 hours, once a week 
Semester credits: 3 3 

Advanced work in clay from life models. 
No restrictions on size of figure or com- 
plexity of project undertaken, though 
faculty approval of all projects is required. 



Sc414 

Studio II 

3 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: 1.5 7.5 

Open studio work periods intended to 

develop independent and personal 

programs of study in close association 

with faculty and advisors in the studio. 

Sc 415 

Studio III 

3 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: 7.5 7.5 

Open studio work periods intended to 

develop independent and personal 

programs of study in close association 

with faculty and advisors in the studio. 

Sc416 

Forging 

6 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: 3 3 

Stresses a sculptural approach to a 

traditional craft. Basic iron working skills 

utilizing forging techniques. 



76 



(f = fall; s = spring) 



Education 



Program Requirements: 



Studio Requirements: 
All certification candidates must complete 
4.5 credits in 2-D studio courses if their 
major is in a 3-D area, and vice-versa. 
Also, one studio course is required In 
Photography or Film. 

Liberal Arts Requirements: 
By the end of the Sophomore year, it is 
recommended that the student complete 
LA 181, Child and Adolescent Develop- 
ment, plus one course in Sociology. In 
addition, students must roster 6 credits 
in Art History at the 200, 300, or 400 level. 

AE214 

Observation and Analysis 
3 hours, once a weel< 
Semester credits: 1.5 
Through school observations and intro- 
duction to philosophies of art education, 
the student has the opportunity to develop 
an understanding of classroom interaction 
and differences in educational programs. 

AE215 

Curriculum Development 

3 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: 1.5 

The student is exposed to methods of 

lesson planning, curriculum development, 

learning theory and their application to 

teaching situations. 

AE216 

Media: Teaching & Technique 
3 hours, once a week 
Semester credits: 1.5 
Through observation, planning and parti- 
cipation in media workshops, this course 
examines the process of selecting mate- 
rial for effective classroom use with 
emphasis on means of lesson 
implementation. 

AE220 

Educational Psychology 
3 hours, once a week 
Semester credits: 3 

Various aspects of educational psychology 
examined. These Include cultural and 
family factors that influence learning, the 
expectations conveyed by teacher be- 
havior, techniques of Instruction, behav- 
iorism and creativity. Emphasis is placed 
on retrospective analysis of each stu- 
dent's individual educational experiences. 



Students who choose to work toward certification 
will take art education courses as related arts 
electives. To assure coordination between the major 
and the teacher certification program it is strongly 
recommended that each student meet with his or her 
art education advisor each semester prior to 
advance registration. 

Detailed descriptions of each major program 
coordinated with teacher certification are available 
in the Education Department. 

Students interested in education but not wishing 
to work toward the certificate may, with department 
permission, take courses on an elective basis. 



AE313 

Saturday Practicum/ Seminar 
4.5 hours, once a week 
7.5 hours, once a week 
Semester credits: 3 
Students are Involved in all aspects of 
the Saturday School, They observe class- 
room interaction, plan and teach lessons, 
and exhibit student worl< under the super- 
vision of professional artist-educators 
and a college supervisor. 

AE314 

Practicum /Seminar 

6 hours, three times a week 

7.5 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: 9 

The student teaches one half a semester 

in an elementary school and the other half 

in a secondary school, three days a week 

under the supervision of a cooperating 

teacher and a college supervisor. 



AE414 

Professional Practices 

3 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: 7.5 

As a culmination of their work in studio 

and in education, each senior designs 

and installs an exhibition and participates 

in a seminar workshop on professional 

practices and contemporary issues in 

education. 



AE credits 

Other required credits 



Total for certification 



33 



77 



Master of Arts in Art Education 



The College offers, through its Education Department, 
a 33-credit Master of Arts in Art Education degree. 
The program consists of three components: the 
Studio Major (15 credits). Liberal Arts (6 credits) and 
Studies in Education (12 credits). Seven credits in 
Education are earned by the student's completion of 
an individually designed thesis or project. Within the 
framework outlined below, a specific program of 
study will be organized for each student according 
to his/her objectives and qualifications. 

a. Liberal Arts, 6 credits 

Graduate work in literature, aesthetics, art history, 
philosophy and psychology is offered and may be 
pursued through coursework or through approved 
independent study. Any 500 level Liberal Arts 
course may be taken to satisfy this requirement. 
Courses below the 500 level must be authorized by 
the program chairperson. 

b. Studio Major, 15 credits 

With approval, studio work may be taken in any one 
of the college's nine major departments. 

c. Studies in Education, 12 credits 
Requirements are the courses listed and 
acceptance of the thesis or project. 

The completion of a candidate's resident program 
does not guarantee the granting of the Master's 
degree. Not only the academic record of the candi- 
date but the complete thesis is subject to final review 
and approval by the student's thesis committee. 

Students transferring from other graduate pro- 
grams, or those having completed acceptable post- 
baccalaureate study elsewhere, may be allowed to 
transfer up to six credits toward their Master's pro- 
gram. The acceptance of these credits is based on 
faculty evaluation. 

In order to be admissable, a candidate must hold 
a Bachelor's Degree or equivalent. However, a 
Teaching Certificate is not required. Those who wish 
the Teaching Certificate (K-12) may pursue it 
concurrently with the M.A. 

The Master of Arts in Art Education program may 
be pursued either full- or part-time. The program must 
be completed within a maximum period of five years 
from the date of admission. 

All degree candidates must maintain a cumulative 
point average of 3.0 in course work to be regarded in 
good academic standing. 

Applications for admission to the graduate program 
must be completed and all credentials submitted by 
April 15 for admission in the succeeding fall semester 
and by November 15 for the spring semester. Submit 
all credentials to the Graduate Admissions Office. 



Financial aid to graduate students is limited to 
grants-in-aid. A student who wants to file for assist- 
ance must complete a Graduate and Professional 
School Financial Aid Service application which can 
be obtained from PCA or the College Scholarship 
Service. The application deadline for such assistance 
is April 15forfalland November 15 forspring. 

Graduate applicants are encouraged to investigate 
the state guaranteed loan program in their state. 



AE500 

Research Methods 
3 hours, once a week 
1st and 2nd semester, 1.5 credits 
Introductory course emphasizing the 
visual art education area. Students learn 
the basis of research design, examine 
selected studies, and execute a study 
of their own. 

AE501 

Readings in Art and Education 

3 hours, once a weel< 

1st and 2nd semester, 1 .5 credits 
Major historical concepts and current 
philosophical issues in art and education 
are examined critically through seminar 
discussion. 

AE509 

Independent Research 

4 hours, once a wee/c 

7s? or 2nd semester, 2 credits 
Students plan and carry out a practicum 
experience in some aspect of art educa- 
tion. Faculty consult with students in 
developing plans and conducting the 
endeavor. Some options would be museum 
education, art supervision, research, arts 
administration, educational media. 

AE510 

Thesis 

14 hours, once a weet< 

1st and/or 2nd semesters, 7 credits 

Through independent study, the student 

investigates the options of historical, 

philosophical, descriptive or experimental 

research. Original thesis research is 

developed and executed by the individual 

under the guidance of a major advisor and 

committee. For each semester the student 

pursues thesis study he or she must 

register for credit. 



78 



Related Arts Electives 



Art Education Department Electives 

Art Education courses for teacher 
certification are rostered as Related Arts 
electives. Refer to the program in Art 
Education for complete course 
descriptions. 

Community Design Electives 

CD 403 

Community Seminar 
3 hours, once a weel< 
1st or 2nd semester, 1 .5 credits 
The review and discussion of problems 
endemic to impacted urban communities. 
A central purpose is to extend the scope 
of professional design fields to include 
considerations that are societal and 
ethical rather than material. City plan- 
ners, community leaders, economists, 
sociologists and other consultants are 
brought in regularly as guest speakers. 
Open to sophomores, juniors, seniors and 
graduate students. 

CD 410 

Game Simulation 
3 hours, once a week 
1st and 2nd semesters, 7.5 credits 
The first semester will concern itself with 
simulation activities and analysis, and 
evaluation of simulation as a technique 
for problem solving. In the second 
semester, emphasis will be placed on 
the design and development of new 
games by the class, as well as oppor- 
tunities for applying problem solving 
formulae developed as a result of the 
simulation experience. 

Craft Department Electives 

Cr200 

Introduction to Fibers 
6 hours, once a week 
1st and 2nd semesters, 3 credits 
This course directs investigation to off- 
loom weaving and the structuring of fiber 
responses, including frame loom, back- 
strap, needle-work, applique, and related 
techniques. Emphasis is placed on 
deriving sound design appropriate to 
material and skill. 

Cr201 

Plaster Workshop 

6 hours, once a week 

1st and 2nd semesters, 3 credits 

Plaster working skills; mold making and 

modeling techniques. Preference for 

registration is given to Crafts majors. 



Cr203 

Jewelry and Metal 

6 hours, once a week 

1st and 2nd semesters, 3 credits 

An introduction to the fundamental 

techniques of metalworking. 

Cr206 

Woodworking 

6 hours, once a week 

1st and 2nd semesters, 3 credits 

Basic hand tool and machine operation 

integrated with an introduction to form 

through wood as the material. Direct 

application of theories through the design 

and execution of furniture. 

Cr207 

Glass 

6 hours, once a week 

1st and 2nd semesters, 3 credits 

Glass considered as an expressive and 

creative medium: students work with 

molten and cold glass, enameling, and 

stained glass techniques. 

Cr209 
Ceramics 

6 hours, once a week 
1st and 2nd semesters, 3 credits 
An introduction to basic ceramics: hand- 
building, throwing, and firing. 

Cr216,316,416 

Glass 

6 hours, once a week 

1st and 2nd semesters. 3 credits 

Glass considered as an expressive and 

creative medium: students work with 

molten and cold glass, off-hand blowing, 

slumping, enameling, and stained glass 

techniques. Preference for registration is 

given to Crafts majors. 

Environmental Design Department 
Electives 

En 202 

Structure and Construction 
3 hours, once a week 
1st and 2nd semesters, 1.5 credits 
A study of natural and man-made struc- 
tures, their principles and applications. 
Development of the ability to understand 
forces and recognize their corresponding 
forms. An introduction to the built environ- 
ment from the standpoint of materials and 
how structures are assembled or 
rehabilitated. 



En 301 

Environmental Psychology 
3 hours, once a week 
1st and 2nd semesters, 1.5 credits 
The study of human behavior in indi- 
viduals and groups as it shapes, or is 
shaped, by the man-made environment. 
Application of field research and data 
gathering to design problems. Includes 
prediction of how spaces will be used 
and environmental simulation. 

En 401 

Experimental Environments 
3 hours, once a week 
1st and 2nd semesters, 7.5 credits 
Design projects will be experimental by: 
a. making environmental application of 
work by other craftspeople, artists, and 
designers within the college: b. using 
new technologies of foaming, air struc- 
tures, and geodesies; c. building full- 
scale mock-ups to simulate and test new 
environments; d. studying theories of 
the future and creating appropriate forms. 

Graphic Design Department Electives 

In addition to the elective courses listed 
below, refer to those listed under the 
major department program. 

GD207 

Typographic and Graphic Processes 

6 hours, once a week 

1st or 2nd semester. 3 credits 

The study of type leading to the use of the 

ready-made letter. Its relation to space. 

format and illustration for the solution of 

pure informational and expressional 

problems. 

GD209 

Basic Design (Photo Emphasis) 

3 hours, once a week 

1st and 2nd semesters, 1.5 credits 

The use of two-dimensional formal studies 

to create unique compositional qualities 

in photographic media. Prerequisite: 

Introduction to Photography. 

GD224 

Graphic Design History 

1 hour, once a week 

2nd semester, .5 credits 

A study of the evolution of graphic design 

and its influences from the industrial 

revolution to the present. 



79 



Illustration Department Electives 

11207 

Calligraphy 

3 hours, once a week 

1 St or 2nd semester. 1 .5 credits 

Classic and current letterforms with 

emphasis on penmanship — cursive, 

uncials. Spencerian script, and Roman 

letterforms are presented. 

11208 

Lettertorms 
3 hours, once a week 
1st or 2nd semester, 1.5 credits 
Investigation of classical and modern 
letterforms with emphasis on contempo- 
rary applications, i.e. logo-types, posters, 
and a variety of design formats. Compre- 
hensive as well as finished rendering 
covered. 

Industrial Design Department Electives 

ID 203 

Engineering Graphics 
3 hours, once a week 
1st or 2nd semester, 1.5 credits 
A course in which freehand and mechan- 
ical conventions of descriptive drawing 
are studied. Orthographic and isometric 
projections, sections, and perspective 
systems are of central concern. 

ID 305 

Visual Techniques 
3 hours, once a week 
1st and 2nd semesters, 1.5 credits 
The first semester is used to develop 
proficiency in the use of Lawson Charts 
as a means of making measured draw- 
mgs. The second semester is devoted to 
developing effective drawing techniques 
for precise descriptions of surface, color, 
and material, using pastels, markers, 
prismacolor, and other designer's 
materials. 

ID 306 

Wood Burning Devices 

3 hours, once a week 

1st or 2nd semester, 2 credits 

A course concerned with understanding 

the energy problem and the design of 

wood burning devices to help solve this 

problem. The first semester deals with 

gathering information and defining the 

project to be designed. The second 

semester is the refinement of that design 

and making and testing the device. 



ID 307 

Industrial Materials and Processes 
3 hours, once a week 
1st and 2nd semesters, 1.5 credits 
Films, lectures, and field trips are used 
to familiarize students with industrial 
fabrication processes for wood, metal, 
and plastics; techniques such as die 
making, injection molding, blow molding, 
lazer cutting, explosion forming, etc. 
Emphasis placed on the study of 
material characteristics and their appro- 
priate use with forming methods. 

Painting and Drawing Department 
Electives 

Pt200 
Drawing 

3 hours, once a week 
1st and 2nd semesters, 1.5 credits 
The principal concern in this course is 
the investigation of all aspects of draw- 
ing: as documentation, as architectonic 
form, as an analytical mode and as 
image. Regular wall criticism and dis- 
cussions, and individualized instruction. 

Pt201 

Descriptive Drawing 

3 hours, once a week 

1st and 2nd semesters, 1 .5 credits 

A specialized drawing class dealing with 

the problems of depicting objects and 

ideas clearly; it covers perspective, scale, 

orthographic and isometric drawing. 

Pt203 

Pastel Drawing 

3 hours, once a week 

1st and 2nd semesters, 1.5 credits 

Response to color line and color mass 

constitute the direction of course format. 

Inventiveness of technique and facility of 

application are directed toward expansion 

of the individual's approach to this media. 

Pt204 

Painting 

6 hours, once a week 

1st and 2nd semesters, 3 credits 

Individualized instruction is coupled with 

group critiques and discussions dealing 

with all aspects of painting. 



Pt 207-407 
Oil Sketching 
3 hours, once a week 
1st semester, 1.5 credits 
This course concentrates on quick color 
sketches in oil and other media. The stu- 
dents produce a series of sketches which 
accent various formal aspects of a prob- 
lem, using color to indicate pattern, 
space, mood, and sensation. They should 
attempt to develop attitudes of purposeful 
play combined with sustained observa- 
tion. The students are encouraged to rely 
upon their intuition as well as upon tradi- 
tional methods. 

Pt210 

Still Lite Painting 

6 hours, once a week 

3 credits 

A specialized course dealing with 

painting, drawing and still life. 

Pt211 

Landscape Drawing and Painting 
6 hours, once a week 
1st or 2nd semester, 3 credits 
This studio course is designed to investi- 
gate the many aspects and problems of 
landscape painting and drawing. Weather 
permitting, classes will be held in outlying 
areas for firsthand contact with land- 
scape. Studio work will consist of work- 
ing from sketches, photographs, and other 
research material. Discussion and slides 
of the history of landscape painting will 
also be included in the course. 

Pt214 

Aqueous Media 
3 hours, once a week 
1st and 2nd semesters, 1.5 credits 
This painting and drawing course deals 
with techniques other than oil. Emphasis 
is placed on economy of means and faith- 
fulness to different media; however, the 
aim is to go beyond the mere develop- 
ment of technique and into development 
of a personal statement. 

Pt217 

Animal Drawing 

3 hours, once a week 

1st or 2nd semester, 1.5 credits 

Animal drawing taught with emphasis on 

the fundamental muscular and skeletal 

structure of mammals other than man. 

Meets at the Philadelphia Zoological 

Gardens. 



80 



Pt220 

Portrait Painting 
3 tiours, once a weel< 
1.5 credits 

The course is designed to explore the 
technical and psychological aspects of 
portrait painting. The program will include 
traditional portrait painting expectations, 
such as, likeness and technique. Impres- 
sion and expression will be explored as 
they relate to the subject's personality 
and the painter's insight. The creative 
development of the student's emotional 
and intellectual individuality in the pursuit 
of realism, expressionism, symbolism, 
and the subject's surroundings will consti- 
tute an important part of the program. 
Lecture will cover the reasons for portrait 
commissions, their reflection of cultural 
trends and the economic facets of 
selling portraits. 

Pt300 

Drawing 

3 hours, once a week 

1st and 2nd semesters, 1.5 credits 

The principal concern in this course is the 

investigation of all aspects of drawing; as 

documentation, as architectonic form, as 

an analytical mode, and as image. 

Pt301 
Macciiiaioli 
3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits 

A way of oil painting which allows the 
students who are interested in working 
from life to sharpen their skills in the prin- 
ciples of color, value, and relation. Of 
paramount importance will be the study 
of the efforts of the IVIacchiaioli (nine- 
teenth century Italian landscape painters) 
who, in a French dominated art world, 
created an art uniquely and intimately 
their own. Their pictures, and the manner 
in which they worked will be the heart 
of the class. 

Pt303 

Oriental Painting 

3 hours, once a week 

1st or 2nd semesters, 1.5 credits 

This course studies various painting 

techniques and materials together with 

Asian art and philosophy. Examples of 

art work from East and West will be 

examined. Students are expected to 

work within the confines of Oriental 

techniques. 



Pt305 

Figure Painting and Drawing 

6 hours, once a week 

1st and 2nd semester, 3 credits 

A course to study the special problems 

involved and disciplines demanded when 

confronting the figure. Emphasis is on 

working directly from the figure, but other 

formal and expressive possibilities of 

figure painting will be explored. Some 

discussion of historic and contemporary 

figure painting. 

Pt306 

Color Theory 
3 hours, once a week 
1st or 2nd semester, 1.5 credits 
An intensive study of color and its func- 
tions in art. Emphasis is placed on its 
expressive and structural aspects through 
studio investigations complemented by 
lectures. 

Pt307 

Museum Copying 

6 hours 

1st or 2nd semester, 3 credits 

This class involves the student in direct 

confrontation with the master works. Its 

object is to inform and enlighten each 

student through tradition; students may 

copy and/or do versions of paintings in 

the Philadelphia Museum of Art. 

Pt308 

Drawing and Painting 

6 hours, once a week 

1st or 2nd semester, 3 credits 

A course dealing with basic principles of 

drawing and painting, combining features 

from Pt 200 and Pt 204. Field trips. 

Pt3n 

Advanced Drawing 

3 hours, once a week 

1.5 credits 

This course is designed to stress the 

student's concerns to develop an image 

through the interpretation and analysis 

of drawing problems. 

Pt312 

Anatomy and the Figure 
3 hours, once a week 
7.5 credits 

This course gives the student the oppor- 
tunity to investigate the varied strategies 
for drawing the human figure — its 
skeletal and muscular interaction and its 
basic positions — and the establishment 
of that figure in a context of light and color. 



Pt313 

Mixed Media 
3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits 

Problems are given which investigate the 
collage/assemblage aesthetic. Emphasis 
is placed on finding the appropriate 
medium(s) for each student's individual 
response to problems. It offers an area 
where sculpture, painting, printmaking, 
photography, and the use of found objects 
can combine and overlap freely. Assist- 
ance concerns aesthetic evaluations 
rather than technical information. 

Pt321 

Artist and Society 

2 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits 

Biweekly lectures with guest artists and 
people from related areas, alternating 
with class seminars, which include 
discussions of the previous lecturers. 

Pt403 

Oriental Painting: Advanced 

3 hours, once a week 
2nd semester, 1 .5 credits 
Continuation and intensification of 
training begun in Pt 303. 

Photography and Film Department 
Electives 

PF20a 

Introduction to Photography: 
Black and White 
3 hours, once a week 
1st or 2nd semester, 1.5 credits 
Brief introduction to basic concepts, 
processes, and techniques of photog- 
raphy, including camera usage, exposure, 
darkroom procedures, lighting, and their 
controlled applications to photographing 
with black and white materials. 

PF209 

Introduction to Photography: Color 
3 hours, once a week 
1st or 2nd semester, 1 .5 credits 
Brief introduction to basic concepts, 
processes, and techniques of photog- 
raphy, including camera usage, exposure, 
film processing, lighting, and their con- 
trolled applications to photographing 
with color transparency materials. 



81 



PF308 

Studio Techniques 
3 hours, once a week 
1st or 2nd semester. 1.5 credits 
Introduction to studio techniques, with 
attention to use of artificial lighting, basic 
set-up procedures, various camera for- 
mats and materials. Prerequisite: PF 208, 
PF 209, or PF 211 A. 

Photography Electives 

In addition to the elective courses listed 
above, the following courses described 
under the major program are open to 
non-majors on a space-available basis: 

PF211A 

Introduction to Photograph"^ I 

1st or 2nd servester, 3 credits 

Required for admission to photography 

courses above PF211A, except PF 308. 

PF211B 

Introduction to Photography II 

1st or 2nd semester, 3 credits 

PF217 

Color in Photography 

1st or 2nd semester, 7.5 credits 

PF311 

Multimedia Workshop 

1st or 2nd semester, 3 credits 

Additional prerequisite: PF217 

PF313 

Studio Workshop 

2nd semester, 3 credits 

Additional prerequisite: PF 217 

PF317 

Color Printing Workshop 

1st or 2nd semester, 3 credits 

Additional prerequisites: PF 217, IL214, 

GD 313, or PT 306 

PF319 

Large Format Photography 

1st or 2nd semester, 1 .5 credits 

PF321 

Selected Topics 

1st or 2nd semester, 1.5 credits 

Additional prerequisite: may vary with 

topic offered. 



Film Electives 



PF210A 

Introduction to Filmmaking I 
1st or 2nd semester, 3 credits 

PF210B 

Introduction to Filmmaking II 
2nd semester, 3 credits 
Prerequisite: PF210A 

PF212 

Animation Workshop 

1st or 2nd semester, 3 credits 

PF214 

Introduction to Video 

1st or 2nd semester, 3 credits 

PF314 

Film Form 

1st semester, 3 credits 

Prerequisites: PF210A and at least one 

Film History course. 

PF318 

Creative Sound 

1st semester, 1.5 credits 

PF412 

Filmmaking Seminar 

1st or 2nd semester, 3 credits 

Prerequisites: PF210A & B, or PF212 

and permission. 

Printmal<ing Department Electives 

PrIOO 

Printmaking (Freshman Elective) 

3 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: 1.5 

Beginning explorations in print media, 

concepts, and vocabulary. Intaglio and 

relief methods are emphasized. 

Experimentations encouraged. 

Pr 200 A 
Reliet-lntaglio 
3 hours, once a week 
Semester credits: 1.5 
Introduction to basic relief printing 
techniques using wood, linoleum, card- 
board, plastics, and metal as materials. 
Experimentation is stressed. 

Pr 200B 

Etching — Intaglio 

3 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: 1.5 

Introduction to etching and engraving 

techniques of working on metal, wood and 

plastic in traditional and contemporary 

ways. 



Pr201 

Screenprinting 
3 hours, once a week 
Semester credits: 1.5 
Introduction to traditional and contem- 
porary serigraphy methods: glue, tusche, 
paper, cut film and photographic silk 
screen stencils. 

Pr C 304 

Fabric Printing: Sitkscreen 

3 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: 1.5 

Textile screen printing with emphasis on 

photoscreen using direct emulsion 

process. Use of pigment and dye printing 

as applied to yardages and one-of-a-kind 

pieces. Simple understanding of repeal 

prints, out paper stencils, and overprinting. 

Pr306 

3-D Printmaking 

3 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: 1.5 

Printmaking for 3D forms and ideas: 

printing techniques for plastics, vacuum 

forming, ceramics, and glass (decals and 

direct printing). 

Pr308 

Printmaking: Photomedia 

3 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: 1.5 

Imagery developed through the use of, 

photosensitive materials: photo etching, 

gum bichromate, cyanotype, etc. 

Pr313 

Bookbinding Methods 

3 hours, once a week 

Semester credits: 1.5 

Workshop instruction in the use of 

materials, basic construction, procedure 

and principles. 



82 



Liberal Arts 



A total of 45 credits must be earned in Liberal Arts 
courses during the undergraduate program. Studies 
in Liberal Arts are divided into four major categories: 
Language and Literature, Social Studies, Art History, 
and Phiilosophiy and Science. Freshmen are urged 
to take 6 credits each in the Language and Litera- 
ture and Art History categories and may, with faculty 
permission, take an additional 3 credits in their 
spring semester. Based on the entering student's 
transcript and SAT verbal test scores. Language & 
Expression (LA 110) may be required; however, 
qualified students may choose any 100 or 200 level 
Language or Literature offering. There are no other 
specific course requirements, although students 
must satisfy a 6-credit total in each subject cate- 
gory. Minimum credit requirements are as follows: 

Language and Literature, exclusive of LA 109, LA 110 6 

Art History, exclusive of Film History 6 

History and Social Studies 6 

Philosophy and Science 6 

Unrestricted Liberal Arts Electives 21 

Total minimum Liberal Arts requirement 45 

Approximately one-half the credit hours required 
in Liberal Arts are electives which may be chosen 
from among the offerings in any of the categories. 
There is also an independent study program which 
permits upperclass students to work with a faculty 
member on a special project. 

Students discovering a strong interest in any 
particular liberal arts subject area may, with the 
approval of their faculty advisors, roster consider- 
ably more credits than are normally required. With 
the major department chairperson's permission, 
credits thus earned beyond the 45 credit minimum 
reduce the student's basic related arts requirement 
in the same manner as do studio electives. 

Excepting the 1 2 credits to be earned during the 
freshman year, there is no fixed credit-per-year 
requirement. To make normal progress toward 
graduation, registering for 6 liberal arts credits per 
semester is recommended. 

A student may not roster the same course twice 
for credit unless it is taught by different instructors. 

Students entering as first-time freshmen in the 
fall of 1974 and thereafter must complete 30 credits 
in liberal arts courses in residence. Up to 15 credits 
in LA subjects may be transferred, provided the 
course work completed elsewhere does not dupli- 
cate PCA course offerings. 



All students who registered initially in the fall of 
1 973 and those who register for the first time after 
that date must earn a minimum of 12 credits in 
PCA 300-400 level liberal arts courses. 

Transfer students are responsible for fulfilling the 
45-credit requirement, though they may apply a 
maximum 30 credits for liberal arts work completed 
elsewhere prior to matriculation at PCA. Transfer 
students having completed fewer than 15 credits 
prior to matriculation may ultimately have no more 
than a total of 15 LA credits transferred to PCA. 
Credits attained elsewhere under this condition may 
not duplicate course work already taken or available 
at PCA. 

Numbering System 

The initial digit is an approximate indication of the 
level of the course, i.e., 1 00 indicates a beginning 
course, 400, a course for the most advanced students. 
Courses offered for graduate credit are on the 500 
level. The second digit indicates the subject category, 
as below: 



010 
020 
030 
040 
050 
060 
070 
080 
090 



Foreign Languages 
Art History 

Social Studies 

Philosophy 

Science 

Interdisciplinary or otherwise unclassified 



The third digit is an arbitrary designation of the 
particular course. A indicates first semester; B indi- 
cates second semester; S indicates a seminar in 
which the enrollment is limited to approximately 
15 students who must have an overall grade point 
average of at least 3.0. 



83 



Language and Literature 



LA 109 

Language and Expression 
1st or 2nd semester, 3 credits 
by examination 

For those whose basic skills need rein- 
forcement, the course provides an Intro- 
duction to the principles of expository 
prose and practice In reading and study 
skills techniques. Five major essays and 
a series of shorter written assignments 
are required. This course must be satis- 
factorily completed before LA 110A can 
be rostered. 

LA nOAand B 
Language and Expression 
1st and 2nd semesters. 6 credits 
Training and practice In expository and 
argumentative writing. Students who are 
required to roster LA 110 must satisfac- 
torily complete LA 11 OA before rostering 
LA 1 1 0B. LA 1 1 0B must be satisfactorily 
completed for graduation; It must be 
rostered the semester following comple- 
tion of LA 110A. 



LA 210A, 210B 

Landmari<s in American Literature 
1st and 2nd semester, 6 credits 
Only those works in poetry, fiction, drama 
and prose which have had a profound 
effect upon American thought and 
American attitudes will be read and 
analyzed In this two semester course. 
While the selection of the "landmarks" 
will be more or less chronological 
according to trends in American literature 
(movements, periods), no strict adherence 
to time periods or phases In the history 
of American life will be followed. Works 
of different times may well be considered 
simultaneously, to draw parallels In 
Ideas and themes. 

LA 214A, 2148 
Oriental Literature 
1st and 2nd semesters, 6 credits 
Poetry, drama, short stories and novels 
of the Far East, particularly China, Japan 
and Southeast Asia, will be read and 
analyzed during the 1st semester. The 
products of these three cultures will be 
related to the literature of the Western 
World, with emphasis on parallels in 
ideas, themes and interpretations of life 
by the writers of the West and East. The 
2nd semester will concentrate on the 
literature of the Near (or Middle) East — 
Babylonian, Hebrew, Arabic, Persian, 
Egyptian. Those works studied will 
include both ancient and contemporary 
works of the Near East. 

LA 215A, 215B 

Siiort Prose 

1st or 2nd semester, 3 credits 

(Not offered 1977-78) 

LA 218 

Major Writers: Sliat^espeare 
1st semester, 3 credits 
Shakespeare and his world, as revealed 
in selected comedies, tragedies, histories, 
romances: and Shakespeare as the ideal 
Renaissance Man shining forth from 
his sonnets, songs and the longer poems 
— such as "Venus and Adonis" — are 
critically studied and discussed. General 
outstanding cinematic productions of 
some of the plays will be viewed and 
compared with the original versions, so 
that the student may come to some 
understanding of the nature of produc- 
tions of Shakespeare's plays. 



LA 218 

Major Writers: Lawrence 

2nd semester, 3 credits 

An In-depth analysis of the major 

themes found in the works of D. H. 

Lawrence through the reading of a 

representative selection of his short 

stories, novellas and novels. 

LA 218 

Major Writers: Hardy 

1st semester, 3 credits 

An In-depth analysis of the major themes 

found in the works of Thomas Hardy 

through the reading of his poetry 

and novels. 

LA 218 

Major Writers: Miiton 
2nd semester, 3 credits 
John Milton, the "Puritan Homer," vigor- 
ous defender of the Commonwealth 
ideal, of the freedom of the press, of the 
rights of divorce — composer of the 
greatest Christian epic, of drama, of 
sonnets, of noble elegies and lyrical 
verse — will be read and critically 
analyzed in the context of his own time 
and in relation to the Classical and 
Biblical Worlds. 

LA 310A, 3108 
Literature of Self-Discovery 
1st or 2nd semester, 3 credits 
(Not offered 1977-78) 

LA 312 

Creative Writing: Drama/Film 

2nd semester, 3 credits 

This course is meant to familiarize the 

student with some of the problems and 

the techniques for writing creatively, while 

providing an opportunity to have his or 

her work analyzed and discussed by fellow 

students and writers. In-class work entails 

the analysis of the technical aspects of 

some known works. 

LA 313 

Creative Writing: Poetry 

1st or 2nd semester. 3 credits 

An investigation of the writing of poetry 

in its varied forms. The development of 

crafts and imagination. Emphasis is on 

student work and class discussion and 

the social uses of poetry. 



84 



Art History 



LA 314 

Literature and Film 
1st semester. 3 credits 
Literature and Film undertakes the study 
of the techniques involved in various 
works of literature (short story, novels, 
plays, etc.) with those techniques (both 
similar and dissimilar) used by film 
makers. Approximately eight novels, 
plays, or short stories are read and dis- 
cussed in terms of their thematic and 
technical elements. Films made from the 
material read are viewed, analyzed in. 
terms of their thematic and technical T 
elements, and discussed. 

LA 315 

Drama: Modern and Traditional 
2nd semester, 3 credits 
The course investigates the source from 
which drama is born. Almost all aspects of 
'theater' are touched on. Theater is 
basically a physical activity, an 'imitation 
of an action'. Consequently, it is an activ- 
ity of the total self. Reading, writing, act- 
ing, directing, and all other aspects of 
theater form the 'content' of the course. 

LA 320A 

Humanities I: Classic, Medieval, 

and Renaissance 

1st semester, 3 credits 

Great works of literature provide 

remarkable keys to understanding and 

appreciating tfie different eras of Western 

Civilization, their similarities and the 

uniqueness of each. In this course we 

shall examine a selection of the greatest 

literary works of Ancient Greece through 

the Renaissance. We shall focus on the 

perspectives and values those works 

reveal: what questions the different 

cultures asked; how they approached 

and defined human potential, fate, 

reality; and, finally, how they defined 

art and the artist's role — entertainer, 

recorder, shaper, conscience, or hero. 

LA 320B 

Humanities II 

2nd semester, 3 credits 

This course will be a continuation of 

Humanities I, focusing on the same 

issues but in the 17th through the 20th 

centuries. Works by Moliere, Pope, 

Voltaire, Goethe, the English Romantic 

poets and others, probably ending with 

James Joyce will be read. 



LA 414A/514A 

Studies in ttie Novel: Nobel Prize Winners 
1st semester, 3 credits 
A novel by each of eight Nobel Prize 
Winners thoroughly examined both for 
its own merits and for the overall view of 
the author's place among fellow recipi- 
ents of the prize. 

LA414B/514B 

Studies in the Novel: Latin American 

Fiction 

2nd semester, 3 credits 

A comprehensive sampling of the best of 

twentieth century Latin American fiction 

studied for a better understanding and 

appreciation of not only the literature but 

also the civilization of Latin America. 

LA 415/515 
20th Century Poetry: 
English and American 
1st or 2nd semester, 3 credits 
Close analysis of the works of Whitman, 
Eliot, Stevens, Williams, Lawrence, Yeats, 
and Frost. Prose on poetry written by 
poets will be used to help understand 
their intentions: what they want to achieve 
in the esthetic and the social realms. The 
work of a few major foreign poets — 
Pavese, Hikmet, Valleho, Rilke, Melosz 
— will also be read in new and important 
translations. Stevens' idea that the pur- 
pose of poetry is "to help people live 
their lives" will be explored throughout 
the course. 

LA 416/516 
Fiction since 1945 
1st semester, 3 credits 
This course will explore the problems and 
concerns of the literary artist in the post 
World War II world. The themes, the 
selection of materials, the techniques, 
and the varying standards of contem- 
porary literature will be considered. 
Styron, Barth, Barthelme, Lessing and 
Kosinski are some of the authors being 
considered for the course. 

LA 130A, 1308 

French I 

1st and 2nd semesters, 6 credits 

A course of beginner French based on 

conversation, grammar, readings on 

French civilization, history, literature and 

film. 

LA 132A, 1328 

Italian I 

1st and 2nd semesters, 6 credits 

A course of beginner Italian centered on 

conversation, reading and basic forms of 

grammar. 



LA 140 

Art History I 

1st semester, 3 credits 

An introduction to the history of the 

visual arts. Such phenomena as style, 

the artist, the role of society, techniques, 

and especially the historical process both 

in art and as a means of understanding 

art are examined. 

LA 141 

Topics in Art History 
2nd semester, 3 credits 
Topics chosen are specifically designed 
to relate the visual arts to creativity and 
to the art of the past. Methods of research 
used in the areas of sociology, psychol- 
ogy, etc., as well as art history, are 
applied to problems arising out of the 
studio area. When practicable, museum 
and gallery exhibitions will be coordinated 
with the course. 

LA 150 A 

Oriental Art History I 
1st semester, 3 credits 
Painting, architecture, and decorative arts 
of the Islamic countries from the Umayyad 
Dynasty of the 7th century A.D. to the 
Safavid Ivan of the 18th century. The inter- 
play and fusion of many different tradi- 
tions and styles under the jurisdiction of 
Islam, with special emphasis placed upon 
the Arabic, Persian, and Turkish contri- 
butions to the Islamic art. The develop- 
ment of Indian art from the ancient Indus 
valley culture of 2000 B.C. to the Mughal 
Dynasty of the 18th century. Special 
emphasis placed upon the Buddhist art 
of the Kushan and Gupta periods, Hindu 
temples and sculpture of the Medieval 
India, paintings of the Mughal and Rajput 
styles. 

LA 1508 

Oriental Art History II 
2nd semester, 3 credits 
Covers Chinese art from the Neolithic 
pottery to the Ming Dynasty paintings of 
the 17th century A.D. Special emphasis 
on the Shang Dynasty bronzes, the Han 
sculpture, the T'ang pottery, and the 
Sung painting. Basic concepts of Con- 
fucianism, Taoism, and Buddhism are 
introduced to aid the student in under- 
standing certain special meanings con- 
tained in Chinese art, especially in 
painting. Japanese art from the Jomon 
and Safavi pottery of the early times to 
the Ukiyo-e painting and woodcuts of 
the 18th century. The influence of various 
Buddhists sects, especially Zen, on 
Japanese art. Comparisons between 
eastern and western cultures will 
be made. 



85 



LA 242A, 242B 

Classical and Medieval Art History 
1st and 2nd semester. 6 credits 
An introduction to the great mainstream 
tradition of early European art, this course 
covers the architecture, sculpture, paint- 
ing, and minor arts of Egypt, Greece, 
Rome, the Byzantine, Early Christian and 
early Islamic civilization and of Europe 
in the Romanesque and Gothic periods. 
It will focus on the major works of 
antiquity and discuss how they have 
been constantly revived in the Western 
world by artists as diverse as Donatello, 
Ingres, Bramante, Picasso and fVlies 
Van der Rohe. 

LA 243A, 243B 

Renaissance and Baroque Art History 
1st or 2nd semesters, 3 credits 
An introduction to the arts of Europe from 
the dawn of the Renaissance in Florence 
in the early 15th century to the political 
and cultural revolutions of the late 18th 
century. Painting, architecture, and sculp- 
ture are discussed in relation to their 
social and cultural background. Prints, 
furniture, and other minor arts are also 
used to illustrate the total artistic produc- 
tion of the period. 

LA 244 

Mythology in Oriental Art 

1st and 2nd semester, 6 credits 

1st semester: the myths of Ancient Egypt, 

Mesopotamia, and India (Indus and 

Vedic period) 

2nd semester: the myths of India 

(Buddhist and Hindu tradition), China, 

and Japan. The class will study the 

theory of myth as presented by prominent 

scholars. It will pay special attention to 

the close relationship between myth 

and art. 

LA 245A, 245B 
Modern Architecture 
1st and 2nd semester, 6 credits 
Modern Architecture generally refers to 
European and American experiments in 
architecture during the first forty years 
of the twentieth century and its resultant 
style. The course will attempt to inves- 
tigate this subject with the premise that 
Modern Architecture is a result of archi- 
tecture's attempt to "come to terms" with 
the Industrial Revolution. Thus, it will 
be a study of Modern Architecture as a 
historical phenomena of the 19th and 
20th centuries. 



LA 250. 2508 

History of Contemporary Sculpture 

1st and 2nd semester, 6 credits 

A survey of 20th century sculpture from 

Rodin to contemporary developments in 

video and performance. Particular 

emphasis will be given to American 

sculpture since World War II. 

LA 251 

Introduction to Photography 
1st semester, 3 credits 
An examination of photography as a 
medium, with a view to understanding its 
nature, its relationship to painting and 
other visual arts, its social and tech- 
nological contexts, its principal idioms, 
and central aesthetic issues relating to 
photographic criticism. The course is 
intended to serve as background for 
the practice of photography as well as 
an introduction to the study of photo- 
graphic history and criticism. 

M255 

History o1 Photography 
2nd semester, 3 credits 
The objectives of the course are to 
provide an introduction to the significant 
images and image makers in the history 
of photography, to discuss the major 
visual and aesthetic trends in the develop- 
ment of the medium, and to develop a 
model for a critical approach to the 
connoisseurship of photographs. 

LA 350A, 350B 

History of 20th Century Crafts 

1st and 2nd semester, 6 credits 

This course explores the development of 

20th century contemporary crafts 

(ceramics, glass, wood, metal, and 

fabrics) with an emphasis on the unique 

contributions of the studio artist post 

World War II to the present. 

LA 353, LA 354 

impressionism. Post- Impressionism 
(1st semester) (2nd semester) 
3 credits each semester 
These so-called "styles" of the nineteenth 
century are "generally" considered as 
the foundation of European modern art. 
The course will investigate them in their 
historical and cultural context — 
chronologically. Also studied are the 
technical and conceptual philosophies 
that underlie their development. 

LA 446/546 

Aesthetics ot the Urban Environment 

1st semester, 3 credits 

(Not offered 1977-78) 



LA 446S/546S 

Aesthetics of the Urban Environment: 

Seminar 

2nd semester, 3 credits 

(Not offered 1977-78) 

LA 448/548 

American Art since 1945 — 
From Gesture to Performance 
1st or 2nd semester, 3 credits 
In 1945 World War II ended, the United 
Slates emerged as a leading world power, 
and the focus of art history shifted from 
Paris to New York City. This course will 
begin with that moment by the study 
of gestural painting, or Abstract Expres- 
sionism, and will conclude with a 
discussion of performance pieces and 
other contemporary movements in 
painting and sculpture. Contemporary 
architecture, photography, film and 
multi-media will also be included. 

LA 454/554 

The Bauhaus: 

Art and Design in the Twenties 

1st semester, 3 credits 

(Not offered 1977-78) 

LA 455/555 

Art Deco: Art and Design in the Thirties 

2nd semester, 3 credits 

(Not offered 1977-78) 



86 



Film History 



History and Social Studies 



Credits earned in this area do not satisfy 
the Art History requirement. 

LA 148 

Introduction to Film 
1st or 2nd semester, 3 credits 
The course will examine the nature of the 
film experience as a major force in the 
"idea of the contemporary". It will be 
concerned, therefore, with the relationship 
of significant films to the modern tra- 
dition — to art-historical movements; 
to narrative and theatrical conventions; 
to social, intellectual and cultural forces. 
Critical readings will supplement the 
screenings. 

LA 248A 
History ol Film I 
2nd semester, 3 credits 
Cinema as document, as narrative and 
as trance. The course is an introduction 
in film appreciation and in the under- 
standing of the major trends of con- 
temporary cinema. The focus is on 
World Cinema, with special emphasis on 
the avantgarde and experimental movie 
(underground and overground). It 
includes a chapter on cinema-verite and 
on basic contemporary techniques. 

LA 248B 

History ot Film II 
1st semester, 3 credits 
The course will discuss basic terminology 
of film as art. Historically it will offer the 
beginnings and the silent era 
(1880-1930), alternating with analyses 
of the present state of world-cinema. 
The first part of the course covers the 
story of the vitascope and the biography, 
Louis Lumiere, and the films of Melies 
and Porter. The second part discusses 
contemporary movies in relation to the 
basic filmic categories. Thus, photo- 
history is directly confronted with the 
present. It emphasizes the role of 
identification and projection. The course 
deals further with the experimental- 
artistic, with Dada and surrealism and 
surveys contemporary underground 
cinema, etc. In this way the student 
should be able to acquire at the same 
time: 1) a historical perception of the 
emergence of film-language; 2) a sense 
of unity and continuity of the same; and 
3) a feeling of the cyclical nature of 
film-history. 



LA 160 A, 160B 

World History 

1st and 2nd semester, 6 credits 

Major themes in the cultural evolution 

of the world with emphasis on the nature 

of and reason for change in human 

communities. 

LA 161 A, 161B 
U.S. History 

1st and 2nd semester, 6 credits 
The emphasis in this survey course is on 
the interpretation of the American past. 
Lectures and discussions develop issues 
and conflicts in America's past, confront- 
ing the student with problems and 
differing interpretations which deepens 
insight and broadens perspective in 
American history. 

LA 162 

Introduction to Sociology 

1st semesters, 3 credits 

The main conceptual framework applied 

to the study of social phenomena. A 

particular emphasis on language and 

symbols, socialization, the self in society, 

solidarity and differentiation, status and 

class, stratification, norms, law, and 

religion; social organization; culture 

and nature. 

LA 163 

Anthropology 

3 credits 

(Not offered 1977-78) 

LA 164 

Archaeology 

3 credits 

(Not offered 1977-78) 

LA 165 A. 165B 

African and Atro-American History 

and Cultures 

1st or 2nd semester, 3 credits 

A survey of the cultural, economic, 

political, and historical contributions and 

conditions affecting the black man in 

America from the middle ages of Africa 

to the present day. 



LA 260A 
Human Origins 
1st semester, 3 credits 
An introduction lo human biological and 
cultural evolution. A brief introduction lo 
the origin and evolution of life with 
emphasis on mammals; survey of the 
primates, contemporary and fossil; sur- 
vey of the major evolutionary stages: 
Australopithecus, Homo erectus. Homo 
sapiens, Neanderthalensis, Homo spaiens 
sapiens; introduction to Paleolithic tech- 
nologies; discussion of contemporary 
Stone Age societies. 

LA 260B 
Human Origins 
2nd semester, 3 credits 
This course is a chronological succession 
to LA 280A and begins with a selected 
survey of world archeology after the 
Paleolithic. Aims and methods of anthro- 
pological archeology are briefly dis- 
cussed. Emphasis is placed on such 
major archeological problems as the 
beginnings of domestication of plants 
and animals, the rise of urban centers, 
and the peopling of the New World. It is 
preferable, but not necessary, that 
students take 260A before enrolling 
in this course. 

LA 262A, 262B 

Far Eastern History 

1st or 2nd semester, 3 credits 

(Not offered 1977-78) 

LA 263A, 263B 

Political Science 

1st and 2nd semester, 6 credits 

An introductory course dealing with the 

fundamentals of the American political 

system via its institutions and political 

behavior. Topics include: power and 

change, conflict and consent, liberty 

vs. authority. 

LA 264 

Contemporary American Institutions 

and Systems 

3 credits 

(Not offered 1977-78) 

LA 265A, 265B 

History and Culture ot Latin America 
1st and 2nd semester, 6 credits 
A survey of the world south of the 
Rio Grande. Indigenous as well as 
European cultural sources are investi- 
gated, national distinctions explored, 
and the relationship of this area to the 
U.S. considered. 



87 



Philosophy/Science 



LA 266 

Social Interaction and Social Structures 

2nd semester, 3 credits 

Social perception; information control; 

definition of the situation; drama and 

strategy; expression and communication; 

ritual betiavior, instincts and culture; 

territoriality; distance and space; privacy; 

intimacy and impersonality; conversations 

and non-verbal behavior; social 

relationships. 

LA 267 

Introduction to Cultural Anthropology 
1st semester, 3 credits 
Aspects of culture in different societies, 
western and non-western. Study of insti- 
tutions such as kinship and marriage, 
subsistence, socialization, and religions. 

LA 360 

Beliet Systems ot Native Nortli America 

2nd semester, 3 credits 

A survey of North American Indian 

cultures with special emphasis on 

religious beliefs and world view. 

LA 361 A. 361 B 

Criminology 

1st and 2nd semester, 6 credits 

This course divides the major sociological 

discipline of criminology into its major 

areas. An in-depth study of the general 

causes of crime and the methods of 

studying the offender; the procedures of 

the police and the courts' penology, the 

treatment of the criminal and programs 

of crime prevention. 

LA 363 

Social Problems 

2nd semester, 3 credits 

(Not offered 1977-78) 

LA 366A, 366B 

The City: Its History and Uses 
1st or 2nd semester, 3 credits 
(Not offered 1977-78) 

LA 460, 560 

20th Century American Society 

3 credits 

(Not offered 1977-78) 

LA 461 

American Revolution 

1st or 2nd semester, 3 credits 

An in-depth study of the most crucial 

years in the history of the American 

people. The critical issues which led to 

independence, and philosophy of the 

period, and the war for independence 

are among the topics studied. 



LA 110 A, 1708 

Introduction to Philosophy 

1st and 2nd semester, 6 credits 

An introduction to analytic philosophy; 

includes a brief examination of the history 

of western philosophy with an emphasis 

on modern philosophy and the works of 

Descartes, Berkely, and Hume. Several 

substantive problems are considered in 

detail, such as the existence of God, the 

mind-body problem, and the nature of 

knowledge. 

LA 181 A 

Child and Adolescent Psychology 
1st or 2nd semester, 3 credits 
This course includes study of the physical, 
intellectual, emotional and social devel- 
opment of the child; parent-child relation- 
ships, personality development, self- 
concept, the psycho-social stages of 
human life and the quest for identity. 

LA 181B 

Adult Psychology 
2nd semester, 3 credits 
This course is developmentally oriented 
and focus is upon Erikson's psychosocial 
crises from adolescence to death. Some 
major topics studied are: career choice, 
human sexuality, love, marriage, values, 
mental health and mental illness, aging 
and death. 

LA 281 

Readings in Psychology 
1st semester, 3 credits 
(Not offered 1977-78) 

LA 282 

Concepts and Structures ot Mathematics 
1st semester, 3 credits 
This course is designed for students with 
no previous background in mathematics. 
Elementary topics in logic, space, and 
functions are discussed. Of interest in 
itself, the course forms a suitable founda- 
tion for students who wish to pursue more 
advanced courses in analytic geometry 
and calculus. 

LA 283A, 283B 

Sight and Sound 

2nd semester, 3 credits 

A study of the anatomical and functional 

aspects of vision and hearing as well as 

the psychological theories of perceptual 

organization. 



LA 371 

Theories ol Knowledge and Reality 

3 credits 

(Not offered 1977-78) 

LA 372 

Existentialism 

1st semester, 3 credits 

(Not offered 1977-78} 

LA 373A, 373B 
Comparative Religions 
Isi and 2nd semester, 6 credits 
The purpose of the course is to study the 
world's major religions using a com- 
parative-religion text and readings in the 
literature of most of the religions studied. 
The first semester covers the following; 
religions of India, including Vedic, 
Jainism, Buddhism, and Hinduism; 
religions of the Far East, including 
Confucianism, Taoism, and Shintoism. 
The second semester will look at the 
Judeo-Christian experience and the 
Moslem experience. 

LA 380A 

Lite Sciences 

1st semester, 3 credits 

The study of life as it evolved from 

unicellular organisms to humans. Special 

emphasis on behavior, instinct and 

learning, aggression and human nature, 

and ecology. 

LA 380B 

Physical Sciences 
2nd semester, 3 credits 
An investigation of astronomy, geology, 
and other physical sciences, the origin 
of the universe and solar system, the 
nature of physical sciences, matter and 
energy. This course provides a back- 
ground for understanding the problems of 
scientific impact on human values. 

LA 382 

Contemporary Psychology 

3 credits 

(Not offered 1977-78) 

LA 384 

Abnormal Psychology 
1st semester, 3 credits 
Human development and abnormal psy- 
chology: ego defenses, emotional dis- 
orders, therapeutic theories and treatment 
techniques. Clinical diagnosis and classi- 
fication of mental disorders. 



88 



General Studies 



LA 385 

Social Psychology 

2nd semester, 3 credits 

An exploration of family dynamics, group 

befiavior, attitudes, communications, 

group processes, roles and culture. An 

examination of our social institutions and 

social problems. 

LA 386 

Advanced Mathematics 
2nd semester, 3 credits 
The major topics covered in tfiis course 
include the real number system, functions 
and relations, exponential and logarithmic 
functions, elementary circular and trigo- 
nometric functions and an introduction to 
the calculus. Elementary differention and 
integration are combined with applied 
problems in rates, areas, curve length, 
and volumes. 

LA 387 

Applied Psychology ol Design 
1st semester, 3 credits 
An introduction to the general concepts of 
human information, utilization, in-take and 
out-put. Subjects covered include: the 
nature of human attention, rules affecting 
the rate and types of information that can 
be attended to, the way that such informa- 
tion is internally processed. The design 
of visual and auditory displays, devices for 
human manual manipulation (knobs, 
levers, controls in general), work spaces 
and general environmental considerations 
are explored in depth. The relationship of 
design to environmental stress and human 
safety and comfort is considered. 

LA 470, 570 

Aesthetics 

1st semester, 3 credits 

An introduction to the philosophy of art. 

After a brief examination of analytic 

philosophic methods and the history of 

aesthetics, we consider some of the 

fundamental problems in aesthetics: the 

intention of the artist, the physical object/ 

aesthetic object distinction, and the 

nature and comparison of different kinds 

of art media. The relationship between 

language and art is central to the course. 



LA 470S/570S 
Aesthetics Seminar 
2nd semester, 3 credits 
This course is a critical, in depth, exami- 
nation of some fundamental problems in 
the philosophy of art. It reviews the 
analytic method of philosophic inquiry, 
considers the relevance of Wittgenstein to 
contemporary aesthetics (i.e., what can be 
said about works of art and what cannot 
be said) and also covers some recent 
theories of Nelson Goodman regarding 
representation, exemplification and 
symbol systems. 

LA 471 

Social Philosophy 

3 credits 

(Not offered 1977-78) 

LA 480 

Psychology ol Creativity 
1st semester, 3 credits 
A psychological analysis of the creative 
process. Some of the major areas dis- 
cussed are: definition of creativity, 
relationship between intelligence and cre- 
ativity, relationship between personality 
and creativity, environmental forces that 
facilitate and those forces that hamper 
creativity, creativity as a mode of estab- 
lishing values between the artist and 
society, etc. 

LA481, 581 

Freud and Freudian Psychology 

3 credits 

(Not offered 1977-78) 

LA 482, 582 

Post-Freudian Psychology 
2nd semester, 3 credits 
(Not offered 1977-78) 



LA 091 A, 091B 

Music in Art 

1st and 2nd semester, 6 credits 

This is primarily a listening course of 

Romantic music from the second half of 

the 19th century. This period begins with 

the death of Beethoven and ends wtih the 

death of Mahler. It includes Berlioz. 

Brahms. Wagner and French 

Impressionism. 

LA 394 

Creative Lite ol the Early 20th Century 

3 credits 

(Not offered 1977-78) 

LA 395 

Creative Lite ol the Later 20th Century 

3 credits 

(Not offered 1977-78) 



89 



Art Therapy 



Students who choose to enroll in the Art Therapy 
program roster art therapy courses as related arts 
electives. Students complete all requirements in 
their chosen major department; the BFA or BS degree 
is awarded in the studio major with concentration 
noted in art therapy. 

Interested students should request an interview 
with the Art Therapy advisor in the liberal arts 
department oftice. 



Program Requirements: 



Liberal Arts Requirements: 

By the end of the sophomore year, 

students should have completed LA 181 A 

and B, Introduction to Psychology, and 

any two of the following five courses: 

LA 162. Introduction to Sociology: LA 163, 

Introduction to AnVnropology; LA 170, 

Introduction to Ptiilosopiiy: LA 267, 

Cultural Anti^ropology: LA 365, Cultural 

Change. 

Juniors should roster: LA 384, Abnormal 

Psychology and LA 385, Social 

Psychology. 

AT 300 

Emotional and Social Problems 

(practicum) 

3 hours, once a week 

1st semester, 3 credits 

A field course involving visits to a variety 

of institutions. The student is exposed to 

the wider range of disorders: intellectual, 

physical, emotional, and social. The 

course is developmentally oriented: 

children, adolescents, adults, and aged. 

AT 301 

Social and Group Process 

3 hours, once a week 

1st semester, 3 credits 

A group dynamics course in order to 

help the student better understand him 

or herself and his or her interactions with 

others. To assist the student to deal 

directly with feelings activated by 

field visits. 



AT 302 

Clinical Aspects ot Art Therapy 

3 hours, once a week 

2nd semester, 3 credits 

A weekly meeting with the Art Therapist 

and Psychiatrist to present a survey of the 

field of Art Therapy through live 

interviews, films, literature and discussion. 

AT 303 

Theories and Techniques ol Art Therapy 

2 hours, twice a week 

2nd semester, 3 credits 

An introduction to the different types of 

disorders and the theories and techniques 

of art therapy utilized with the various 

populations. 



AT 400 

Theories ot Personality 

3 hours, once a week 

1st semester, 3 credits 

An emphasis on psychoanalytic theory 

but also including behaviorism, 

humanism, existentialism, etc. 

AT 401 

Senior Practicum (restricted) 
3 hours, once a week 
2nd semester, 3 credits 
A field placement for the mature and 
exceptional student. An opportunity for 
supervised clinical practicum is arranged 
for those students who have demon- 
strated exceptional ability; selection of 
students is based on the academic 
average in AT courses, individual 
maturity, and potential for growth. The 
selection is determined by the consensus 
of the Art Therapy faculty and advisor. 



Required AT credits 
Restricted AT credits 
Specified LA credits 
Supporting LA credits 

Total 



90 



Adjunct and Summer Progams 



Evening Division 

The Evening Division offers a variety of studio and 
lecture courses in many phases of art from an 
introductory level to advanced professional study. 
These courses may be taken individually or as part 
of a program leading to a professional career in art. 
The Evening Division serves three areas of study: 

1. Day College Portfolio Requirement 

In lieu of a portfolio for entrance to the PCA day 
college, a student may take 3 one-semester 
Evening Division foundation courses. 

2. Credit or Audit 

Any nonmajor courses may be taken for credit 
or audit. 

3. Certificate 

The certificate program provides professional 
preparation in these three areas: advertising 
design, illustration and interior design. The 
course vi^ork in any of these areas can be com- 
pleted by attending 2 nights a week for 5 years, 
or in less time by enrolling for more than 2 
evenings a week. Advanced standing can be 
granted only on the basis of portfolio presentation. 
The certification program requires a total of 
33 credits, including 6 in academic subjects. 
During the summer, the Evening Division offers 
selected courses which serve as prerequisites for 
the certificate program and also general elective 
subjects in many studio areas. 

Any Evening Division course may be taken by 
PCA undergraduate degree matriculants. 

Credits for the following four courses, however, 
cannot be transferred to meet requirements for the 
BFA or BS degree: Drawing, A100E, Color and 
Design, A110E; Form Study A109E and 144E, 
Histon/ of Ideas Through the Arts. 



Pennsylvania Academy /PCA 
Cooperative Program 

In 1970, PCA and the Pennsylvania Academy of the 
Fine Arts inaugurated an extraordinary transfer pro- 
gram to serve the Academy's scholastically qualified 
four year certificate candidates and graduates who 
seek a baccalaureate degree. 

PAFA graduates and students currently enrolled 
in the PAFA 96 credit certificate program who gain 
formal Academy endorsement are admissible to 
PCA as degree-credit registrants. These registrants 
complete PCA's prevailing liberal arts credit 
requirements for its Bachelor of Fine Arts degree. 
All students who registered initially in the fall of 
1973 and those who register for the first time after 
that date must earn a minimum of 12 credits in 
PCA 300-400 level liberal arts courses. They will be 
considered to have fulfilled PCA's studio require- 
ments for degree graduation upon receipt of the 
Academy's certificate. A maximum 12 semester 
credits earned at another institution in liberal arts 
course work will be evaluated for transfer toward 
PCA's requirements. 

Reciprocally, the Academy will accommodate PCA 
students who wish to augment their studio programs 
by registering for selected PAFA course offerings, 
class size permitting. 

Artists For Environment Program 

As a member of the Union of Independent Colleges 
of Art, PCA participates in the Artists for Environment 
Program. This unique program permits sophomores 
and juniors majoring in painting to enroll for one 
semester at the Delaware Water Gap National 
Recreation Area in Columbia, New Jersey. 

This non-profit foundation, located in unspoiled 
mountainous isolation, is affiliated with the National 
Park Service of the U.S. Department of the Interior. 
Artists for Environment is a community of painters 
working, living, and studying together for concen- 
trated periods, attempting to re-root their identities 
in nature and their environment. 

Each student is provided with his or her own 
living quarters and studio space. Students work 
independently, with weekly or bi-weekly instruction 
from resident staff. Final reports and evaluations are 
sent to the student's home institution. Participants in 
the program work closely with National Park Service 
personnel — naturalists, historians, and Rangers. 
The curriculum is augmented by trips to museums 
and galleries, and visiting faculty, artists, photog- 
raphers, and musicians are available for presenta- 
tions and critiques on an informal basis. 



91 



Curricular Requirements 



Credit Distribution 

The student is ultimately responsible for the com- 
pletion of all course requirements for the degree 
program in which he is enrolled. 

The college requires an absolute minimum of 
130 credits for graduation. 

In the foundation program, students must carry 
9 credits each semester in the core program of two 
and three dimensional design studies and drawing. 
Additionally, they take 6 credits each semester in 
liberal arts subjects and at least one freshman studio 
elective each term for a year's total of 33 credits. 

First-time freshmen are not allowed to roster 
additional studio courses; transfer freshmen, how- 
ever, may carry additional studio work in their 
second semester with the express approval of the 
Foundation Program Co-Chairpersons and if 
rostering permits. 

Thereafter, a student carrying an average of 16.5 
credits per semester is considered to be making 
normal progress towards graduation. 

Within the major instructional departments, credit 
requirements vary from a low of 36 to a high of 51 . 
Major departments may recommend or require 
specific courses offered by other departments, but 
there are no fixed numerical limits for these related 
arts courses. Depending upon in-major require- 
ments and mandated electives, the number of free 
related arts remaining for each student varies from 
a low of 16 to a high of 31 credits. 

All students are required to satisfy the 45-credit 
Liberal Arts Department requirement for graduation. 
Beyond the 12 credits specifically required during 
the freshman year, students may pace themselves 
as they wish. 

Thus, the basic credit structure is as follows: 

Program Credits 
Foundation Program (core studies) 18 

Major Program 36-51 

Related Arts 16-31 

Liberal Arts 45 

Minimum Baccalaureate Requirement 130 

Full-time status 

The minimum credit load for full-time student status 
is considered to be 12 per semester. Full-time status 
is not required to maintain enrollment in any 
undergraduate program. 



Credit IHour ratio 

Semester credits are earned at the ratio of one 
credit for one class-contact hour in all Liberal Arts 
courses; in studio courses one semester credit is 
given for two contact hours. In both instances the 
sum total of in-class and required out-of-class work 
is considered to be the same, that is, a minimum of 
3 hours of work per week per credit. Each lecture 
hour of class time is presumed to require two hours 
of preparation, while each two hours of studio 
class time requires an average of one hour's 
preparation. 

Change of Major 

students may request a change of major at the 
beginning of any semester during the drop/add 
period. The student's formal petition requires the 
approval of his/her faculty advisor and of the chair- 
person of both his/herformer department and of the 
department he or she wishes to enter. All major and 
related arts credits, previously earned, may be applied 
toward relative requirements in the new department 
which then determines the student's remaining credit 
obligations. Regardless of the semester in which 
such change is effected, a minimum of 22 credits 
must be earned in the new major; exceptions can be 
made only by the Dean of Students with the con- 
currence of the Dean of Faculty. 

Residence Requirement and 
Transfer Credit 

A maximum total of 67 semester credits is allowed 
upon transfer for previous college-level work at 
other institutions. Credit is granted only for courses 
in which a grade of C or better, or the equivalent, 
is achieved. 

Every transfer student must complete in residence, 
and in no fewer than four semesters, an absolute 
minimum of 63 credits. Of these, 48 credits must be 
in studio, with 28 in major concentration. Regardless 
of studio achievement, the student is responsible 
also for fulfilling the 45-credit Liberal Arts 
requirement as outlined below. 

Transfer students can apply towards PCA require- 
ments up to 30 credits for liberal arts course work 
completed prior to matriculation at PCA. They are 
to earn no fewer than 15 credits in residence. 
Transfer students having completed fewer than 15 
credits prior to matriculation may ultimately have 
no more than a total of 15 liberal arts credits 
transferred to PCA. Credits attained elsewhere under 
this condition may not duplicate course work 
previously taken or available at PCA. 



92 



students entering PCA as first-time freshmen in 
the fall of 1974 and thereafter must earn 30 credits 
in liberal arts courses at PCA. Up to 15 credits in 
this area may be acquired elsewhere, provided the 
course work involved does not duplicate courses 
already taken or available at PCA. All students who 
registered initially in the fall of 1973 and all those 
who matriculate thereafter must roster a minimum of 
12 hours in PCA 300-400 level liberal arts courses. 

Advisors 

During the freshman year, Foundation Program faculty 
and the chairpeople serve as student advisors. When 
beginning a major, each student is assigned a new 
faculty advisor who is retained throughout his or her 
tenure in the same department. Another faculty 
advisor is appointed only when the student changes 
major department. 

Students are expected to meet with their advisor 
at least twice each semester. Any and all roster 
changes desired by the student require the advisor's 
approval. Advance scheduling, preceding each 
semester's registration, is always completed by the 
student in consultation with his or her faculty advisor. 

The student is finally responsible for the completion 
of all course requirements for the degree program 
in which heorshe is enrolled, including meeting 
distribution requirements and the minimum 130 
credits required for graduation. 

Each professional department is assigned one 
or more liberal arts faculty members who are avail- 
able to assist both major advisors and their advisees 
in the selection of a course of study. 

It is the student's responsibility to confer with his or 
her advisor. Report forms to advise students, depart- 
ment chairpeople, and the registrar are employed. 
Transcript copies of advisees' records are available 
upon request to faculty advisors and students. 



Departmental Function 

A student's progress and welfare within the several 
instructional programs of the college is primarily the 
responsibility of the major department. In addition 
to providing each major student with the guidance 
of an assigned faculty advisor, the department's 
faculty and its chairperson undertake to establish 
and promote appropriate standards of performance. 

Beyond the college's minimum requirements, 
each department may establish additional in-major 
requirements with respect to attendance, lateness, 
and related matters. 

The chairperson, with the concurrence of his 
faculty, may: 

1. establish a higher minimum grade point average 
requirement in major than the minimum of 

2.0 (C) set by the college; 

2. require that a student repeat a course or courses; 

3. place a student on departmental probation and 
define its terms; 

4. drop a student from the department. 

Every student must have the approval of his or 
her department to proceed to the next level of 
course work. It is the department's responsibility 
to keep each student informed of his or her progress 
toward graduation. And finally, the student's petition 
to graduate must be approved by the department 
chairperson in conference with hisorherfaculty. 



93 



Academic Regulations 



Readmission 

Written appeal for reinstatement as a degree candi- 
date should be addressed to the Dean of Students 
well in advance of the semester for which the former 
student desires to register. The appropriate depart- 
mental faculty must endorse readmission. 

Return-degree Candidacy 

Diploma graduates of the College may wish to attain 
the bachelor's degree now offered by PCA in their 
former professional field of study. They should 
request the Office of the Dean of Students for read- 
mission to register for completion of prevailing 
liberal arts credit requirements. Any number of 
credits are transferable for equivalent course 
work from other institutions. 

Terms of Enrollment 

A student is enrolled full-time if his or her courses, 
both studio and liberal arts, total 12 or more semes- 
ter credits. For graduate students, 10 or more 
semester credits constitute full-time enrollment. 

Class Attendance 

All students are expected to attend classes regularly 
and promptly, and for the duration of the scheduled 
instructional time. There is no class cut allowance. 
Individual instructors will decide the optimum time 
for marking attendance and may penalize for habit- 
ual lateness. For absences totaling 15% of the 
number of class meetings scheduled through the 
semester, the student will receive formal warning 
that course registration is in jeopardy. Reported 
absences exceeding 25% of scheduled class time 
will be cause for the student being withdrawn from 
the course and the recording of a WF grade. 



Grading System 







Grade Point 


A 


Excellent 


4.0 


B-l- 


Very Good 


3.5 


B 


Good 


3.0 


C-l- 


Moderately Good 


2.5 


C 


Satisfactory 


2.0 


D + 


Slightly better than passing 


1.5 


D 


Poor but passing 


1.0 


1 


Incomplete 


— 


F 


Failing 





WP 


Withdrew passing 


— 


WF 


Withdrew failing 






When a course previously failed is repeated and a 
passing grade earned, both the failing and repeat 
grades remain permanently recorded; on petition, 
however, the grade point average is recomputed to 
exclude any penalty for the initial failure. 

When registering for liberal arts courses, students 
may elect to be graded P (pass) or F (fail). 

Under this option, the P grade earns credit; 
neither the P nor the F is computed in the grade 
average. 

Graduation Requirements 

The responsibility for completion of course require- 
ments for the BFA, BS, or MA degree is the student's. 

To be certified for graduation, a student must 
fulfill all applicable credit requirements, satisfy the 
minimum resident requirement of two academic 
years, achieve a minimum cumulative grade point 
record of 2.0 (C average), and receive the approval 
of his or her department chairperson as having met 
all major requirements. 

Withdrawal 

A student may withdraw at any time during the 
academic year by initiating the proper notice with 
the Office of the Associate Dean of Students, secur- 
ing financial clearance from the Business Office and 
filing the completed notice for the Registrar's en- 
dorsement. When the student does not complete 
a semester, a WP or WF grade, as appropriate, is 
recorded for each course rostered. 

The previously enrolled student who does not 
register for the next semester will be considered 
withdrawn. 

A leave of absence will be granted by the Dean 
of Students for reasonable cause, if the student's 
cumulative grade point average is at least 2.0 (C 
average), and provided the students has achieved 
a 3.0 (B average) in major course work for the most 
recently completed semester. A leave is for a speci- 
fied semester or year and before expiration does 
not require formal readmission. 



94 



General Information 



Dismissal 

It is the college's prerogative to dismiss a student 
for stated cause. Failure to clear academic proba- 
tion requirements will result in dismissal action by 
the Academic Review Committee. The Disciplinary 
Committee may order suspension or expulsion for 
student conduct judged unacceptable. 

Further, a faculty member may drop a student 
from his or her class for stated cause; i.e., non- 
attendance, non-achievement, or disciplinary 
reasons. 



Accreditation 

The Philadelphia College of Art is accredited by the 
Middle States Association of Colleges and Secondary 
Schools, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and 
National Association of Schools of Art. 

Schedule of Semester Charges and Fees 

In the fall of 1 973, the college adopted a per credit 
tuition charge in all college programs (undergradu- 
ate, graduate, and the Evening Division). The under- . 
graduate charge is $112 per credit: $100 tuition and 
$12 General Fee. 



Tuition per credit and General Fee, undergraduate. 




full-time or part-time 


$112 


Graduate tuition per credit 


112 


Inservice Observation Fee 


85 


(Teacher Certification Program only) 




Late Registration 


25 


Late payment 


20 


Transcript of record 


2 


Graduation 


20 



Health Services Fee (foundation and transfer students) 9 

General Fees contribute towards the costs of library 
facilities, operation and maintenance of physical 
plant, student activities, specialized services such 
as health and placement, and registration. The Board 
of Trustees has resolved that $5 of the per credit 
tuition charge may be set aside for the sole purpose 
of capital expenditures. The General Fee is not 
refundable under any circumstances. 

A $50 deposit is required of every dormitory resi- 
dent. Any breakage or damage for which the student 
is responsible will be deducted from this deposit. 
The unexpended portion of the deposit is refunded 
when the student vacates the dormitory. 

Annual Undergraduate Expenses 

Resident Commuting 



Tuition and General Fee 






(based on an average credit 






load of 1 6.5 per semester at 






$112 per credit) 


$3696. 


$3696. 


Student Residence 






Apartment Rental 


1100. 




Board (assuming the use of 






apartment kitchen facilities) 


550. 




Art supplies and books 


400. 


400. 


Commuting and lunch 




350. 



Estimated annual expenses 
(including miscellaneous 
expenses) 



$5700-6200 $4400-4700 



95 



Financial Responsibility 

Payment in full of semester billing is required for 
clearance to register. The college does not offer a 
monthly installment plan whereby enrollment costs 
may be paid over the course of a year. However, there 
are several such plans available from various banks 
and information will be supplied to all students at the 
time tuition statements are mailed, or upon request. 
The college does offer a deferred payment plan which 
permits payment of a minimum one-half of a semes- 
ter's tuition prior to the first day of classes and the 
balance in two equal payments, one payment due 
thirty days from the first day of classes and the second 
payment due sixty days from the first day of classes. 
Approval for this deferred plan must be requested 
from the Financial Aid Office as soon as the student 
receives his tuition bill. The student personally, and 
his parents if he or she has not attained the age of 
majority, must assume full obligation for any and all 
college charges levied. 

Because the college's costs incurred for each 
registration exceed appreciably the income derived 
from tuition and other charges, refund policies must 
be severly restricted. For official withdrawal the fol- 
lowing refund policy is in effect: 

For withdrawal during the first week of classes — 
80% refund 

For withdrawal during the second week of classes — 
80% refund 

For withdrawal during the third week of classes — 
60% refund 

For withdrawal during the fourth week of classes — 
40% refund 

For withdrawal during the fifth week of classes — 
20% refund 

No refund after the fifth week of classes 

A student required to withdraw for disciplinary or 
other cause will not be entitled to any refund. Student 
Residence apartment rent, general fees, and other 
charges are not refundable. 

Financial Aid — 

Enrolled and Former Students 

Financial assistance at PCA is awarded on the basis 
of demonstrable financial need. Awards are normally 
tendered for an academic year by formal application 
and must be renewed annually. The annual applica- 
tion period is February 1 through March 31. 



The college administers its own financial aid pro- 
gram which consists of funds of its own, both grant 
and job, as well as funds from the following three Fed- 
eral college-based programs: National Direct Student 
Loan (NDSL), College Work-Study (CWS), and Sup- 
plemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG). 
Aid awards are "packaged" and may consist of grant, 
loan and employment or any combination of these 
depending upon relative family circumstances and 
availability of aid resources. Students may not apply 
for a specific one of the above kinds of aid. 

An enrolled student, or a former student planning 
re-enrollment, must file a PCA application form during 
the two-month application period, a supporting confi- 
dential financial statement, the Financial Aid Form 
(FAF) of the College Scholarship Service, and in addi- 
tion, a copy of his own and parents' most recent 
Federal Income Tax Form. Applicants twenty-three 
years of age or older who can answer negatively to 
the following three Federal government regulations 
for determination of independent student status will 
be treated as self-supporting students and allowed a 
twelve-month budget in the determination of need. 

1 . Did (or will) student live with parents or guardian 
for more than two consecutive weeks during the 
preceding year, the current year and the subse- 
quent year? 

2. Was (or will) student (be) listed as an exemption 
on parents' or guardian's U.S. income tax return 
for the preceding year, the current year or the 
subsequent year? 

3. Did (or will) student receive financial assistance of 
$600. or more from parents or guardian during the 
preceding year, the current year or subsequent 
year? 

A student receiving aid must maintain at least a C 
average for renewal of aid. The college reserves the 
right to terminate assistance at the end of the fall term 
if the student's record falls below the level for 
eligibility. 

If a student has already earned a bachelor's degree 
at another institution, he or she is ineligible to file for 
aid from PCA. Students enrolled only for teacher certi- 
fication are also ineligible; only matriculated, full-time, 
or part-time students may receive financial assistance 
through the college. Aid awards are normally made 
for a maximum of eight semesters. Students requiring 
a longer enrollment as a resultof change of major or 
other circumstances, will be approved for continued 
aid on an individual basis. PCA cannot guarantee aid 
beyond a maximum of eight semesters and the 
required number of credits for graduation. 



96 



Financial aid awarded by tine college may be used 
only to meet educational costs incurred by enrollment 
at PCA or a domestic UICA Student Mobility arrange- 
ment. The college is not able to assist with enrollment 
at foreign institutions. 

Students receiving aid from outside sources are 
obliged to notify the college when such aid is 
accepted. 

For Graduate aid, refer to Graduate Bulletins. 

Outside Sources of Financial Aid 

Any student in need of financial aid who is eligible for 
state or federal grants as described below, will be 
expected to file applications for such grants. The 
probable amount of state or federal aid will betaken 
into consideration in the making of a college award. 
The college will not replace aid a student is eligible to 
receive through a state or federal program, but for 
which he or she fails to apply. 

State Grants 

The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania offers substan- 
tial grants (maximum $1 200.) to needy students and 
all Pennsylvania residents are expected to make 
application to the Pennsylvania Higher Education 
Assistance Agency (PHEAA) for such assistance. In 
addition, the following states offer grants, tenable 
out-of-state, to meet education costs: Connecticut, 
Massachusetts, New Jersey, Rhode Island and Ver- 
mont. Inquiry should be made to your state office of 
education. 

Federal Grants 

The Basic Educational Opportunity Grant Program 
(BEOG), more commonly referred to as Basic Grants 
or BOGs, is a Federal program, which when fully 
funded, entitles every student with financial need to 
financial assistance. Maximum grants presently are 
$1400. less the amount of a student's expected family 
contribution. Applications and instructions forfiling 
applications for Basic Grants are available from col- 
leges, high schools and post offices. Students pres- 
ently holding grants are normally mailed renewal 
applications. 

State Guaranteed Loans 

All states have guaranteed loan programs. Maximum 
amounts that can be borrowed for an academic year 
range from $1 500. in some states ($2500. in Pennsyl- 
vania) to $2500. in others. There is an automatic 
Federal interest subsidy for the period of enrollment if 
the annual adjusted income is $25,000. or below. 
Repayment of loan principal begins nine months 
following graduation or withdrawal from the college. 



A state guaranteed loan must be treated as a finan- 
cial resource by the college in the computStion of its 
own financial aid award to a student, if the award 
includes Federal monies such as SEGG or NDSL. If a 
student has applied for aid from PCA the recom- 
mended procedure is for him or her to delay process- 
ing of the state guaranteed loan application until the 
college has acted on his or her aid application. 

Social Regulations 

The college's regulations governing non-academic 
student conduct are intended to maintain a viable 
and orderly institutional society, safeguard the par- 
ticular values and common welfare of its student 
body, and promote the best possible environment for 
professional study. Membership in the college com- 
munity is regarded as a privilege, and the student is 
expected to exercise self-discipline and good judge- 
ment. By official registration, he or she acknowledges 
the college's authority to define and enforce 
standards of acceptable conduct. 

Adjudication of alleged student misconduct is the 
responsibility of the Office of the Dean of Students 
and is delegated to the Disciplinary Committee, rep- 
resenting the student body, faculty and administra- 
tion. A complete reference to all rules and procedures 
is contained in the current PCA Student Handbook. 

Student Work 

The college reserves the right to retain one or more 
examples of each student's work to be added to its 
permanent collection of student art. 

College Liability 

The college cannot be responsible for the loss of a 
student's personal property resulting from fire, theft, 
or any other cause. Personal insurance is 
recommended. 

Civil Rights Compliance 

The college's personnel policies and practices guar- 
antee fair employment and educational opportunity 
in concert with existing Federal and Commonwealth 
laws against discrimination for reasons of sex, race, 
color, religion, age, or national origin. 



97 



Facilities 



Instructional Workshops 

The college operates several shops and technical 
facilities: a complete bronze casting foundry and 
welding shop; facilities for working in plaster, 
plastics, wood, stone and terra cotta; photographic 
processing equipment and darkrooms, and other 
specialized equipment requisite to departmental 
offerings. 

Library 

Though the library reflects the college's emphasis 
on the arts, more than half of the 36,000 volumes 
currently held are in the humanities and sciences. 
The library subscribes to 270 periodicals and main- 
tains back issues of important foreign and English 
language journals in bound volumes, microfilm, or 
boxed files. A collection of 1000 circulating records 
and audio tapes (music and spoken) supplements 
the larger non-circulating collection of the Phila- 
delphia Musical Academy, to which PCA students 
have ready access. More than 100,000 indexed pic- 
tures, pamphlets and other ephemera are also avail- 
able for circulation, in addition to more than 300 
mounted posters and fine reproductions held for 
classroom or library use. 

Audio-Visual Center 

The slide and motion picture collections of the 
Audio-Visual Center serve both faculty and stu- 
dents. Over 120,000 slides and more than 800 fea- 
ture and short films are available through the PCA 
collection and an affiliated private collection. 

College Store 

All necessary materials and books can be purchased 
in the College Store. Charge accounts may be ar- 
ranged by advance deposits made in the Business 
Office. 

Health Service 

The college maintains a health service, open daily 
throughout the regular academic sessions and staffed 
by a resident nurse and a visiting physician. 

The college is within walking distance, or at the 
most a short bus or subway ride, to a number of major 
medical institutions: Thomas Jefferson Medical Col- 
lege & Hospital, Pennsylvania Hospital & University 
Medical College, Wills Eye Hospital, and Hahnemann 
Medical College & Hospital. 



Meal Service 

The college maintains a cafeteria that serves break- 
fast and lunch. Food vending machines are acces- 
sible at all times, both in the main instructional 
building and at the residence hall. 

Housing 

Campus housing for a limited number of students is 
available in the college's Student Residence which 
features apartment-style accommodations, with 
kitchen and bath. The Office of the Associate Dean of 
Students will advise sophomores and upperclassmen 
who seek satisfactory off-campus housing, but it does 
not inspect or guarantee an advertised listing. 

Career Development and Placement Office 

The Career Development and Placement Office 
believes that a student's career development is an 
integral part of the academic experience, beginning 
with his or her admission to the college. The office, as 
with any other college or university, cannot guarantee 
job placement: however, its program does afford 
students an opportunity for career counseling, devel- 
oping career planning and job seeking skills, and 
career related programs, such as internships, infor- 
mational seminars, and other learning experiences 
to supplement those from the college classroom 
and studio. 

Services include part-time, full-time, freelance, and 
summer job listings and referrals, a growing career 
library, career workshops and seminars for students 
and young professional artists, a career resource file 
of alumni /ae, employers and colleagues in the field, 
information on grants available to the visual artist, and 
a credentials service to assist students and alumni/ae 
in their application for employment or admission to 
graduate school. The director meets with each stu- 
dent to discuss relevant career goals and options. 
Students are strongly urged to begin career planning 
and discussion in the first years of their academic 
preparation in orderto maximize the integration of 
their academic and career development. 

Student Activities 

The Philadelphia College of Art sponsors and funds 
an Arts Council which is in charge of all co-curricular 
programming. Programs sponsored in the past year 
have included weekly and special film series; trips to 
art and cultural centers; rock/jazz concerts; lectures; 
coffee houses; a competitive basketball team; "Y" 
athletic memberships and the annual Spring Informal 
dance. Membership includes students, staff and 
faculty and additional members are always welcome. 



98 



Calendar 1977-78 



First Semester, 1977 



Student Residence Opens 

New Foundation Student Registration 

Former Returning and New Transfer 

Student's Registration 

New Student Orientation 

Classes Begin 

Labor Day, Holiday 

Late Registration (4 days) 

Drop/Add Period (one weel<) 

Last Day for Removal of Incompletes 



Advising Period 

Advance Registration 

Thanksgiving Vacation 

Evaluation/Examination Weel< 

Final Semester Grades Due from Faculty 

Student Residence Closes 

for Mid-Year Intermission 

Ivlid-Year Intermission (4 weel<s) 



Sunday, August 28 
Ivlonday, August 29 

Tuesday, August 30 
Tuesday-Wednesday, August 30-31 
Thursday, September 1 
Ivlonday, Septembers 
Friday-Thursday, September 2-8 
Thursday-Thursday, September 1-8 
An incomplete grade received in the 1977 
spring semester must be removed by 
Wednesday, October 12. 
Thursday-Wednesday, November 3-16 
November 17, 18, 21, 22 
Thursday & Friday, November 24, 25 
Tuesday-Monday, December 13-19 
Monday, December 19 

Tuesday, December 20 
Tuesday-Monday, December 20- 
January 23 



Second Semester, 1978 



New Students Registration 
Student Residence Opens 
Classes Begin 
Late Registration (one week) 
Drop/Add Period (one week) 
Financial Aid Application (enrolled 
students) Period for 1978-79 
Last Day for Removal of Incomplete 



Spring Vacation 

Student Residence Closes 

Student Residence Opens 

Classes Resume 

Freshman Major Orientation 

Advising Period 

Advance Registration 

Related and Liberal Arts Classes End 

Final Semester Grades due from 

Faculty (Related/L.A.) 

Evaluation/Examination Week 

Final Semester Grades (Foundation 

Program & Studio Major) due from 

Faculty/Spring Term Ends 

Student Residence closes for all 

students except Seniors 

Commencement 

Student Residence closes for year 



Wednesday, January 18 
Sunday, January 22 
Monday, January 23 
Tuesday-Monday, January 24-30 
Monday-Friday, January 23-27 

Wednesday, February 1 

An incomplete grade received in the 1977 

fall semester must be removed by 

Friday, March 3. 

Monday-Friday, March 20-24 

Saturday, March 18 

Sunday, March 26 

Monday, March 27 

Tuesday-Monday, March 28-April 13 

Tuesday-Monday, April 1 1 -24 

April 25, 26, 27 

Friday, May 12 

Friday, May 19 
Monday-Friday, May 22-26 



Friday, May 26 

Saturday, May 27 
Friday, June 2 
Saturday, June 3 



99 



Board of Trustees 



H. Ober Hess, Chairman 

Arnold A. Bayard 

Mrs. Helen Boehm 

Nathaniel R. Bowditch 

Mrs. Helen Chait 

Thomas Neil Crater 

James Eiseman 

Philip J. Eitzen 

Kermit J. Hall 

Mrs. Samuel M. V. Hamilton 

Mrs. Anne Kayser 

Louis Klein 

Berton E, Korman 

Mrs. Austin Lamont 

Samuel M. Lehrer 



Mrs. H. Gates Lloyd 

Sam S. McKeel 

Paul A. McKim 

Kevin Miller 

Richard L. Newburger 

Gordon Parks 

Ronald K. Porter 

Mrs. Meyer P. Potamkin 

Meyer P. Potamkin 

William L. Rafsky 

Mel Richman 

Mrs. Sydney Roberts Rockefeller 

Mrs. Lessing J. Rosenwald 

Samuel R. Shipley, III 

Philip H. Ward, III 

Howard A. Wolf 



Honorary Trustees 

Mrs. Malcolm Lloyd 
Mrs. Marguerite Walter 
Mrs. Thomas Raeburn White 
Mrs. John Wintersteen 

Ex-Officio Members 

The Honorable Frank L. Rizzo 
Robert W. Crawford 
George X. Schwartz 



Administration 1977-1978 



President: 
Thomas F. Schutte, AB, MBA, DBA 

Business Manager and Assistant 

Treasurer: 

Morris Weiss, BS 
Assistants to the Business Manager: 

William Piatt, BA 

Edwin A. Schofield, BA 
Manager of College Store: 

Maria Tillman 
Director of Buildings and Grounds: 

Leslie Goetschius 
Director of Development: 

William E. Benbow, AB 
Director of Communications/ 

Alumni Relations: 

Mackarness M. Goode, BA, MA 
Director of Publications: 

Bradley Cast, BFA 
Administrative Assistant, 

President's Office: 

Sally A. McCabe, BA 



Dean of Faculty: 
Nathan Knobler, BFA, MFA 

Associate Dean for Liberal Arts: 

Patricia Cruser, BA, MA 
Director, Evening Division: 

Barbara Ward, Diploma, PCA 
Director of Exhibitions: 

Janet Kardon, BS, MA 
Act 101 Project Director: 

Curtis Dailey, BA, MA 
Counsellors: 

Henry Hulett, BA 

Queen Jones, BA, MA 
Librarian: 

Hazel Gustow, BA, MLS 
Slide Library: 

John Caldwell, BA 
Audio Visual Center: 

Jack Snyder 
Models and Properties: 

James Grabitz 



Dean of Students: 
Eugene Fixler, BA, MA 

Associate Dean of Students: 

Glenn Stroud, BA, MA 
Financial Aid Counselor: 

Susan McMonigal 
Director of Career Development & 

Placement: 

Rona Wexler, BA, MA 
Director of Admissions: 

Kay Ransdell, AB 
Assistant Director of Admissions: 

Barbara Elliott Heuser 
Admissions Counselor: 

Roy Domingo Cortez, BS 
Admissions Counselor: 

Sally A. Erickson, BA 
Registrar: 

Alda Alvarez, BA 
Counseling Psychologists: 

Arthur Sendrow, BA, MA 

Judith Katz, AB, MA, Ed. D. 
Consulting Physicians: 

Carolyn Michaelson, M.D. 

Michael Michaelson, M.D. 
Day College Nurse: 

Chiqui Somers, RN 



100 



Faculty 1977-1978 



Hans-Ulrich Allemann 
Associate Professor: Graphic Design 
Chairperson: Graphic Design 
Graphic Designer 
Allgemeine Gewerbeschule, Basle 
Switzerland 

Member of AIGA; member of AFK 
Design group; winner of Swiss National 
Stipend Award for Applied Art, 1967; 
"Typomundus" Award, 1970; publica- 
tions include: Graphis, Typograptiisclie 
Monatsblaetter, Publicite, Modem 
Publicity, Symbois and Trademarl<s of 
the World; group exhibits in Switzer- 
land, Germany, and U.S.A. 

Edgar Anderson 

Lecturer: Wood Design 

Designer, Craftsman 

Pratt Institute, Chicago Tech. 

Furniture designer; craftsman in 
wood, metal; board member and sum- 
mer teacher, Peters Valley Craftsmen; 
exhibitor at many museums and 
galleries; employed in Central 
American and Caribbean craft 
development programs. 

Edna Andrade 
Professor: Design, Color 
Painter 

BFA, University of Pennsylvania, 
Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts 
Collections: Philadelphia Museum of 
Art; Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine 
Arts; McNay Institute; Yale Art Gallery; 
Chrysler Museum; Tamarind Collection, 
University of New Mexico. One person 
exhibitions: Marian Locks Gallery; 
Rutgers University; Peale Galleries of 
the Pennsylvania Academy; East 
Hampton Gallery. Selected group 
exhibitions: "Focus on Women in the 
Arts," Philadelphia Civic Center; "The 
Invisible Artist" and "Philadelphia: 
Three Centuries of American Art," 
Philadelphia Museum of Art; "In This 
Academy," Pennsylvania Academy. 

John Andrews 

Associate Professor: 

Foundation Program 

Designer, Blacksmith, Photographer 

BID, Pratt Institute 

Currently working in steel as an 
expression of form and utility. 

Peter Arfaa 

Lecturer: Foundation Program 

BA, M.Arch., University of Pennsylvania 

Assistant Professor, Department of 
Architecture, Drexel University; 
Executive Director, Phila. Chapter, 
American Institute of Architects. 

Eugene Baguskas 
Associate Professor: Painting, Drawing 
Painter 
BFA, Yale University 



Recent exhibitions: Earth Art I & II, 
Phila., 1973-4; one-man show: Green 
Mountain Gallery, 1974; "In Praise of 
Space," landscape painting in Ameri- 
can art, 1976. Paintings in numerous 
private and public collections. 

William Barnett 
Assistant Professor: Painting, Drawing 
Painter 

Temple University, Phila. College of Art 
Work in the permanent collections of 
the Phila. Museum of Art, Penna. 
Academy of the Fine Arts; Albright 
Museum, Cleveland Museum, and 
numerous private collections in Europe 
and the U.S. Guggenheim Fellowship 
and Award in Painting; five one-man 
shows. 

Wayne Bates 
Assistant Professor: Ceramics 
Co-Chairperson: Crafts Department 
BA, Union University 
MFA, University of Georgia 

Invited to show in exhibit "100 
Artists, 200 Years," financed by the 
Xerox Corp. at Fairtree Gallery, N.Y., 
1976; formerly involved with the 
Moravian Tile Works, the Henry 
Chapman Mercer Museum, project to 
reproduce selections from the mu- 
seum's collection of unusual decorative 
tiles from the early 1900's; served as 
part-time manager in charge of 
reproductions and summer apprentice- 
ship program, 1974-75, consultant 
for 1975-76. 

Morris Herd 

Professor: Painting, Drawing 
Painter 

Diploma, Philadelphia College of Art 
Painting reproduced in A Sense of 
Place, Vol. II by Alan Gussow; works 
recently acquired by Univ. of Penna. 
Law School, First Penna. Bank; one- 
man show, Marian Locks Gallery, 
Phila., 1975; four-man show, Penn 
State College Art Museum, 1975. 

Stephen Berg 
Associate Professor: English, 
Social Studies 
Poet 
BA, State University of Iowa 

Guggenheim Fellowship in Poetry 
Writing, 1974-75; Grief, Poems and 
Versions of Poems, 1975, Grossman/ 
Viking; translator with Diskin Clay of 
Sophocles' Oedipus The King, 
Oxford Univ. Press, 1977; a founding 
editor of the American Poetry Review; 
author of The Daughters and Nothing 
in the Word; NEA Writing Grant, 1976; 
Rockefeller Fellowship, 1959-61; 
Frank O'Hara Memorial Prize, 1970. 

Shirley Bernstein 
Lecturer: Printmaking 
Drawer, Printmaker 

101 



BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 
MFA, Indiana University 

Previously taught: Knoxville College, 
Tenn.; Cooper Union, N.Y.; Kean 
College of N.J.; Beaver College, Pa.; 
exhibited: Hansen Galleries, SOHO, 
N.Y.; Lehman College, N.Y.; A.I.R. 
Gallery, SOHO, N.Y.; Bard College, 
N.Y.; New England Center for Continu- 
ing Education, Durham, N.H.; 9th 
Annual Avant Garde Festival, Seaport 
Museum, N.Y.; Kean College, N.J.; 
current work at: The Printmaking 
Workshop, N.Y.; The Print Club, Pa.; 
Marian Locks Gallery, Pa.; Katharine 
Markel Gallery, N.Y. 

Frances Bonds-White 

Lecturer: Environmental Design 
BA, Birmingham-Southern College 
M.Ed, Temple University 

Psychotherapist, psychology faculty, 
Phila. College of Textiles and Sciences; 
child development instructor, Temple 
University, 1972-74. 

Horia Bratu 
Lecturer: Film History 
BA, MA, University of Bucharest 
Doctorate, All-Union Institute of 
Cinematography, Moscow 

Editor, Literary and Film Critic; Pub- 
lications: "Semiology as an inter- 
disciplinary approach; The Rhetoric 
of the Silent," USA-Film Diary. 

Martha Breiden 
Lecturer: History, Comparative Religion 
AB, Randolph Macon College 
MA, University of Pennsylvania 

Phi Beta Kappa; Who's Who in 
American Colleges and Universities. 

Robert Bruegmann 
Special Lecturer: Liberal Arts 
Art Historian 
BA, Principia College 
PhD, University of Pennsylvania 
Teaching fellow. University of 
Pennsylvania; lecturer, Philadelphia 
Community College; historian. Historic 
American Buildings Survey, Historic 
American Engineering Record, 
National Park Service. 

Mark Burns 
Assistant Professor: Crafts 
Diploma, Dayton Art Institute 
MFA, University of Washington 

Recent exhibitions: Tyler Hall Art 
Gallery, SUNY Oswego: "Clay USA," 
Sendrick Gallery, Washington, DC: 
Whitney Museum of American Art; 
Bucks County College; Bloomfield Hills 
Museum, Michigan: The Fairtree 
Gallery, NY, "Surfaces in Ceramic 
Art;" A Modest Proposal Gallery, 
Seattle; Northwest Crafts Ctr., Seattle; 
Helen Drutt Gallery; 27th Annual 
Ceramic Exhibition, Butler Museum of 
American Art, Ohio; Japan International 



Pottery Design Competition; has also 
taught: The Factory of Visual Arts, 
Seattle, and State Univ. of NY at 
Oswego. 

Cynthia Carlson 

Associate Professor: Painting 
Co-Chairperson; Painting Department 
BFA, Chicago Art Institute 
fVlFA, Pratt Institute 

One-person shows: Hundred Acres, 
NY; Marian Locks Gallery, Phila.; 
Phyllis Kind Gallery, Chicago; Whitney 
Biannual of Painting and Sculpture. 

John W. Carnell 

Lecturer: Photography 

Photographer 

BFA, University of New Mexico 

MFA, Tyler School of Art 

Exhibited at The Print Club, Phila., 
Pa.; Center for the Fine Arts, University 
of South Dakota; Museum of 
New Mexico. 

Dante Cattani 
Professor: Anatomical Drawing, 
Painting 

Designer, Painter 
BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 

Lecturer at Beaver College and Univ. 
of Penna. in anatomy and drawing; 
Illustrator/designer for Hoedt Studios, 
N. W. Ayer, Gray & Rogers, Curtis, and 
others; unpublished book "The Human 
Form;" murals with Allen Saalburg and 
Jean Francksen at Bloomingdales, N.Y., 
Helen Caro, Cheltenham, Parkway 
House, Phila., and Riverview Homes for 
the Aged; paintings and prints in 
numerous collections; film and anima- 
tion for Welch Studios, Contemporary 
Enterprises TV Studios. 

Patricia Cruser 

Professor: Literature 

Associate Dean for Liberal Arts 

Chairperson: Liberal Arts Department 

AB, Dickinson College 

MA, University of Pennsylvania 

Director, Art Therapy Program; 
Affirmative Action Officer, UICA Liberal 
Arts Chairperson. 

Lawrence Curry 
Associate Professor: Social Studies 
Educator. Historian 
BA, MA, University of Pennsylvania 

A History of Salem County, Princeton 
Univ. Press; recent articles: "The Early 
Anti-Slavery Movement in Philadel- 
phia," "The Moderates in Pennsylvania 
1775-6;" currently "Systems and Insti- 
tutions — Changes in Contemporary 
American Society;" County Commis- 
sioner, Montgomery County, Pa. 

William Daley 

Professor: Industrial Design 
Co-Chairperson: Crafts Department 
Designer, Craftsman 

102 



BA, Massachusetts College of Art 
MA, Columbia University 

Member, Helen Drutt Gallery; "Clay 
USA" exhibition, Sendrik Gallery, 
Wash., D.C.; guest professor, Univ. of 
New Mexico; commission: ceramic wall, 
Fairfield Maxwell Corp., Ltd, NY, 1975; 
invited exhibitor, "Philadelphia: Three 
Centuries of American Art," Phila. 
Museum of Art, 1976. 

Thomas Dan 

Lecturer: Sculpture 

Sculptor 

BFA, San Francisco Art Institute 

MFA, Yale University 

Exhibitions: Oakland County Museum; 
Stockton State College; collections: 
San Francisco Museum of Art; Chrysler 
Museum. 

Larry Day 

Professor: Painting, Drawing 

Painter 

BFA, BS, Tyler School of Art 

Work in the collection of the Phila. 
Museum of Art, Fleisher Art Memorial, 
Phila. College of Art; numerous one- 
man shows; currently affiliated with 
McCleaf Gallery, Phila. 

Robert DeFuccio 

Associate Professor: Crafts 

Industrial Designer (specializing in 

furniture design) 

BS, State University of New York at 

Oswego 

Rochester Institute of Technology 

Work in Industrial Design Magazine, 
18th Annual Design Review; inde- 
pendent design consultant since 1971; 
clients include Knoll International, The 
Gunlocke Co., Stow/Davis Furniture 
Co.; American Academy in Rome/NEA 
Mid-Career Fellowship in Design, 1976; 
chair design in Industrial Design Maga- 
zine, 22nd Annual Review; Institute of 
Business Designers Gold Award, 
Chairs, 1975; Triangle Chair Design, 
1977. 

Mary Ellen Didier 

Lecturer: Anthropology, Archeology 
BA, University of Wisconsin 
MA, University of Chicago 

Archeologist with interests in inter- 
disciplinary research between the 
sciences and archeology; interests 
include lithic technology cultural 
process in the Near East and Eastern 
U.S., preservation and protection of 
archeological materials. 

Patricia Bryce Dreher 
Lecturer: Printmaking 
Painter, Graphic Artist 
BFA, ME, S.U.NY. at Buffalo 

Fullbright Hayes Grant to Sweden: 
Royal Academy of Fine Arts and 
Konstfackskolan; Department of Textile 
Printing, Stockholm; Yale University 



School for Music and Art 

Recent exhibitions: Fabric Design 
International, University of Kansas; 
Regional Art Exhibition, University of 
Delaware. 
Helen Williams Drutt 

Lecturer: History of Craft 
BFA, Tyler School of Art 
Albert Barnes Foundation 

Curatorial consultant, Contemporary 
Crafts; Director, Helen Drutt Gallery; 
Executive Director, Phila. Council of 
Professional Craftsmen, 1967-74; has 
lectured at Royal College of Art, Lon- 
don; Rochester Inst, of Technology, 
Cranbrook Academy of Art, Univ. of 
Texas; member 1st Craft Panel, College 
Art Association, 1974; sole juror "Sur- 
vey 74" Museum, Cranbrook Academy; 
craft research for "British Contemporary 
Design," Phila. Museum of Art, 1974; 
Award of Merit, Philadelphia College of 
Art, 1972. 

Peter Eastman 

Lecturer: Photography and Film 

Filmmaker 

BFA, Carnegie-Mellon University 

Film showings 1975: Museum of Fine 
Art, Filmex (Los Angeles International 
Exposition), Athens International Film 
Festival, Douglass College Film Festi- 
val, Grenoble, France International Film 
Festival; Virgin Islands Film Festival, 
Deauville, France Film Festival; prize- 
winner, Atlanta Independent Film Fes- 
tival, 1977. 

Benjamin Eisenstat 
Professor: Painting, Drawing, Illustration 
Painter, Illustrator 

Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts 
Albert Barnes Foundation 

First Award Watercolor USA, 1972; 
National Drawing shows' 75: So. Illinois 
Univ., Rutgers Univ.; guest lecturer 
1976, Parsons School of Design and 
Cambridge Univ., U.K.'COllections: IVB, 
ARC, Ford Motor Co., US Maritime 
Commission; Clients: Provident Mutual 
Insurance Co., Heritage National Bank, 
Squibb Inc. 

Martha Eriebacher 
Lecturer: Illustration 
Painter 
BID, MFA, Pratt Institute 

Formerly taught at Pratt, Parsons 
School of Design; affiliated with Robert 
Schoekopf Gallery, NY. 

Walter Eriebacher 
Professor: Sculpture 
Interim Chairperson: Sculpture 
Sculptor 
BID, MID, Pratt Institute 

Taught previously at Pratt Institute; 
gallery affiliation: Robert Schoekopf, NY. 

Ruben Eshkanian 
Professor: Fibers 



Fabric Designer 

BA, Wayne University 

Cranbrool< Academy of Art 

Worl< in the permanent collections of 
tfie Detroit Institute of Art, Johnson Wax 
Collection, Museum of Contemporary 
Crafts. 

Richard Felton 

Special Lecturer: Graphic Design 
BS, University of Cincinnati 
MFA, Yale University 

Rafael Ferrer 
Associate Professor: 3-D Design, 
Sculpture 

University of Syracuse 
University of Puerto Rico 

Exhibitions: Museum of Modern Art, 
Whitney Museum, Pasadena Museum of 
Art, Museum of Contemporary Art, 
Chicago, Institute of Contemporary Art, 
Phila., Nancy Hoffman Gallery, New 
York City, 1975, 1977. 
On Sabbatical, 1977-78. 

David Fertig 
Lecturer: Painting 
Painter 

BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 
MFA, Art Institute of Chicago 

Previously served as museum con- 
servator at Art Institute of Chicago. 

John Freas 

Assistant Professor: Illustration 
lliustrator, Rare Book Deaier 
BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 
MFA, Tyler School of Art 

Illustrated books for Houghton Mifflin 
Co.; magazine articles, Piiarmaceutical 
Advertising: proprietor of John Freas 
Rare Books. 
On leave of absence, 1977-78. 

Leah Freedman 

Lecturer: Art Therapy 
Temple University Hospital 
Registered Art Ttierapist 

Publication epigram "Art Therapy 
E.P.P.P.-C.U."; lecture and slides on art 
therapy with adolescents, Dela. Valley 
Art Therapy Assoc, 1975; Drew Univ. 
Art Therapy lecture and workshop, 
1975; Art Therapy film, 1975. 

Frank Galuszka 
Special Lecturer: Graphic Design 
Painter, Printmal<er, Sculptor 
BFA, MFA, Tyler School of Art, Temple 
University 

Formerly taught at Tyler School of 
Art, Louisiana Tech. (AASCU Studies) 
Center in Rome; Aegean School, 
Greece; Fulbright: joint US/Rumanian 
governments grant for "A Young Pro- 
fessional in the Arts" in Bucharest, 
1969-70. 

Bradley Gast 

Lecturer: Printmaking 

Grapiiic Designer 

BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 



Director of Publications Design, 
Phila. College of Art; awards: Philadel- 
phia Art Directors' Club, 1973; Type 
Directors Club, New York, 1976. 

Keith Godard 

Lecturer: Graphic Design 

MFA, Yale University 

National Diploma, London College of 

Printing and Graphic Art 

Co-designer "Immovable Objects" 
exhibition, Cooper-Hewitt Museum of 
Design, Smithsonian Inst.; notecards 
published by Museum of Modern Art. 

Albert Gold 

Professor: Illustration 

Painter, Illustrator 

Diploma, Philadelphia College of Art 

Prix de Rome, 1942, Tiffany Founda- 
tion Grants 1947-8; exhibited in major 
painting annuals in US; in many public 
collections including Library of Con- 
gress, Phila. Museum of Art, Penna. 
Academy of Fine Arts, Ford Collection, 
Standard Oil of NJ, New Britain Mu- 
seum of Fine Art, The Forbes Collection, 
Smithsonian Institution Museum of Fine 
Arts, University of Pennsylvania; cita- 
tions and prizes: Society of Illustrators, 
Phila. Art Alliance, Woodmere Smith 
Grant, Mural, Pew House. 

Eileen Taber Goodman 

Lecturer: Drawing, Foundation Program 

Painter 

BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 

One-woman shows: Swarthmore Col- 
lege, Hollins College; Pennsylvania 
Academy of Fine Arts' Peale House 
Galleries; group exhibitions: "New 
Talent," Terry Dintefass, Inc., NY, "Still 
Life," 1st Street Gallery, NY, Chelten- 
ham Art Center Painting Annual, 
Tobeleah Wechsler Painting Prize. 

Sidney Goodman 

Lecturer: Drawing and Painting 

Painter 

Diploma, Philadelphia College of Art 

Work in the collection of Phila. 
Museum of Art, Brooklyn Museum, 
Museum of Modern Art, Whitney 
Museum of American Art, Library of 
Congress, Joseph Hirshorn Collection; 
Chicago Art Institute; exhibition of 
recent work at Terry Dintenfass Gallery, 
NY, 1977. 

Arlene Gostin 

Associate Professor: Education 

Chairperson: Education 

Printmaker 

University of Cincinnati 

BA, University of Delaware 

MA, Philadelphia College of Art 

Exhibitions: The Art Alliance, The 
Print Club, Rosenfeld Gallery, Langman 
Gallery; collections include: The Phila- 
delphia Museum of Art, Salzburg 
Academy. 

103 



Gerald Greenfield 
Associate Professor: Photography and 
Film 

Chairperson: Photography and Film 
Department 
Piiotographer 
BA, Pacific University 
Han/ard University, Brandeis University, 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
MFA, Rhode Island School of Design 

Formerly taught Univ. of Massachu- 
setts, Boston; recent exhibitions: Addi- 
son Gallery of American Art, Shade 
Gallery, Lewis and Clark College, Univ. 
of Massachusetts, Boston. 
Dorothy Grimm 

Professor: Literature, English, Social 

Studies 

BA, Lebanon Valley College 

BS, Simmons College 

PhD, University of Pennsylvania 

Publications: A l-iistory ot tine Library 
Company ot Piiiladelphia, 1732-1835; 
co-translator of the Danish Scandal in 
Troy by Eva Hemmer Hanson. 
Gerald Herdman 
Assistant Professor: Foundation 
Program, Painting 
Painter 

Certificate, Cleveland Institute of Art 
MFA, University of Pennsylvania 

Has taught previously at Pennsylvania 
State University, Pratt Institute. 
Kenneth Hiebert 

Professor: Graphic Design 

BA, Bethel College 

Diploma, Allgemeine Gewerbeschule, 

Basle, Switzerland 

Research Associate in the Arts, Yale 
University ("Graphics in the Street"); 
"The Opposition of Images . . ." paper 
presented at EDRA 4; typographic sys- 
tem design for IBM and Westinghouse; 
designer of Hermeneia series published 
by Fortress Press (AIGA 50 Best Books 
Award); exhibitor, "The Expanded 
Photograph," Phila. Civic Center, 1971; 
Federal Design Seminar Faculty; Blos- 
som-Kent Summer Program. 
Knolly Desmond Hill 
Lecturer: Art Therapy 
Clinical Psychologist 
BA, Lakehead University 
MA, Lakehead University 

Clinical Psychologist, Hahnemann 
Medical College and Hospital; instruc- 
tor, Bucks County Community College; 
group therapist, Philadelphia public 
schools. 
Alfred J. Ignarri 

Associate Professor: Photography 
Diploma, Philadelphia College of Art 

Creative Director, Charles P. Mills & 
Sons Photographic Studio, Phila.; work 
included in U.S. and European publica- 
tions; exhibited in First Invited Show of 



Photography, Phila. Museum of Art, 
work represented in Museum's perma- 
nent collection; N. W. Ayer & Son, Phila. 
Art Alliance, Friends School, Univ. of 
Penna., Art Directors Club of Phila., Art 
Directors Club of NY, Baltimore Art 
Directors Club, Sharon Hill Farms Photo 
Workshop; 18 years, free lance 
photographer. 

Lewis Jacobs 
Lecturer: Film 

Producer, Director, art and history films 
Philadelphia School of Industrial Arts 
Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts 
Arts Students League 

Judge, consultant, numerous film 
festivals throughout Europe and U.S.; 
adjunct professor, NYU Graduate 
School of Cinema Studies; American 
juror, Venice Film Festival (3 years); 
member Screen Directors Guild, Society 
for Cinematic Studies; author of The 
Rise of the American Film, Introduction 
to the Art ot Movies, Experimental Film 
in America: upcoming book: The Com- 
pound Cinema, the Selected Film 
Writings ol Harry Alan Potamkin; invited 
guest 1975 Berlin Film Festival. 

Steven Jaffe 
Assistant Professor: Painting, 
Foundation 
Painter 

BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 
MFA, Tyler School of Art 

Exhibitions: Phila. Museum of Art, 
Penna. Academy of the Fine Arts, 
Academy of Arts and Letters; work in 
the collection of The University Museum, 
Univ. of Louisville; Samuel White 
Institute of Art, Louisville. 

Roland Jahn 
Associate Professor: Glass, Ceramics 
Craltsman/ Teacher 
BA, MS, MFA, University of Wisconsin 
Work in the collections of: Corning 
Museum of Glass, Phila. Museum of Art, 
Vassar College, Brooks Memorial Art 
Gallery, Memphis, Delaware Art 
Museum, Johnson Foundation, and 
numerous private collections; work dis- 
cussed in Contemporary Art Glass, 
Modern Glass, Glass Registry, Glass Art 
Magazine; exhibitions: "Philadelphia: 
Three Centuries of American Art," 
Philadelphia Museum of Art, 1976; 
"New American Glass," Huntington 
Galleries, Huntington, West Va., 1976; 
commission: Nine chalices for the 41st 
Eucharistic Congress, Philadelphia, 
1976; U.S. delegate. International Con- 
ference on Glassblowing, London. 

Dale Jensen 

Lecturer: Liberal Arts 

Alan Johnson, NCARB 

Assistant Professor: Environmental 
Design 

104 



Chairperson, Environmental Design 

Dept. 

Environmental Designer 

B.Arch., University of Virginia 

M.Arch., University of Pennsylvania 

M. City Planning, University of 

Pennsylvania 

Certificate, Fountainbleau School of 

Fine Arts 

Partner, Alley Friends, Architects; 
project designer, Academy House, 
Phila., AIA Award for Design Excellence; 
Institute of Contemporary Art, inflatable 
building; design consultant. Piedmont 
Va. Community College; Artist in Resi- 
dence, Artpark; Architect, Yanette Solar 
House; Published Unbuilt America. 

Lois Johnson 
Associate Professor: Printmaking 
BS, University of North Dakota 
MFA, University of Wisconsin 

Vice President, American Color Print 
Society; secretary, The Print Club Board 
of Governors; exhibitions: Phila. 
Museum of Art, International Miniature 
Print Exhibition, Graphics International, 
India; one-woman shows, Pennsylvania 
Academy of the Fine Arts, The Print 
Club; visiting lecturer. Nova Scotia Col- 
lege of Art and Design. 

Anne Kaplan 

Lecturer: Education 
Printmaker, Potter 
BA, Antioch College 

One-man shows. Prints for People, 
The Print Club, Philadelphia. 

Jerome E. Kaplan 

Professor: Printmaking 

Diploma, Philadelphia College of Art 

18 one-man shows; Guggenheim Fel- 
lowship, Tamarind Fellowship; Lorca 
and Kafka books with relief prints 
published by Janus Press; collections: 
Phila. Museum of Art, Library of Con- 
gress, National Gallery, Basel Museum; 
Who's Who in American Art. 

Janet Kardon 

Director of Exhibitions 
BS, Temple University 
MA, University of Pennsylvania 

Curator: Line, School of Visual Arts, 
Artists' Maps, Artists' Sketchbooks, 
Time, Philadelphia College of Art; 
publications: Art International, Art in 
America: member. Visual Arts Panel, 
National Endowment for the Arts Twen- 
tieth Century Committee; Advisory 
Board, Institute of Contemporary Art. 

Joel Katz 

Lecturer: Graphic Design 

Graphic Designer 

BA, MFA, Yale University 

Designer, Murphy Levy Wurman, 
Architects; Yale Alumni Magazine; 
instructor, Yale School of Art; adjunct 



professor, Rhode Island School of 
Design. 

Keri Keating 
Special Lecturer: Graphic Design 
Designer, Photographer 
BA, MFA, Yale University 
Partner, AFK Design Group. 

David Kettner 
Associate Professor: Foundation 
Program, Painting 
Painter 

BFA, Cleveland Institute of Art 
MFA, Indiana University 

Exhibitions: "Made in Philadelphia 
2," Institute of Contemporary Art, Phila., 
"North, South, East, West & Middle," 
travelling national drawing show; "Six 
Self-Portraits, 1975 Series;" Solo 
Exhibit, Whitney Museum of American 
Art, New York; "Recent Works," exhibi- 
tion at New York State University, 
Albany, NY; Collections: Philadelphia 
Museum of Art, Rutgers University. 

Robert Keyser 
Associate Professor: Painting, Drawing 
Painter, Etcher 
University of Pennsylvania 
Certificate, Atelier Fernand Leger, Paris 
Exhibitions and collections: USA and 
abroad; dealers: Marian Locks Gallery, 
Paul Rosenberg and Co.; last one-man 
show: Galleria del Temple Universita, 
Rome. 

James Lakis 

Lecturer: Calligraphy and Lettering 
Designer, Calligrapher 
Philadelphia College of Art 

Recent exhibition: Philadelphia Art 
Directors Show 1975; numerous adver- 
tising campaigns for Smith, Kline & 
French Laboratories. 

Michael Lasuchin 
Assistant Professor: Printmaking 
Chairperson: Printmaking Department 
Printmaker, Painter, Designer 
AA, BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 
MFA, Tyler School of Art, Temple 
University 

Widely represented in national and 
international exhibitions; many awards; 
collections include Library of Congress, 
Philadelphia Museum of Art, Allentown 
Art Museum, William Penn Memorial 
Museum, Free Library of Philadelphia, 
Somerset College, University of Dela- 
ware, University of Pennsylvania, 
College of the Siskiyous, The Print Club. 
Georgia Institute of Technology, Okla- 
homa Art Center. Penn State IJniverslty 
Museum of Art. Represented: Rosenfeld 
Gallery, Philadelphia; Venable Neslage 
Gallery, Washington, D.C. 

David Lebe 

Lecturer: Photography 
Photographer 



One-man show, The Print Club; 
co-editor, Barbara Blondeau 1938-1974. 
Abraham Leibson 

Lecturer; Industrial Design 
Consultant, Industrial Designer 
BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 

Designer of electronic and electro- 
mechanical equipment, sports products, 
computer related products, medical 
equipment, package development and 
package graphics. 
William Longhauser 

Special Lecturer; Graphic Design 

Graphic Designer 

BS, University of Cincinnati 

Associate Instructor, Graphic Design 
Dept., Indiana University, 1974; formerly 
employed by Ford Motor Company Art 
Dept., several design studios in 
Cincinnati. 
Leon Lugassy 
Assistant Professor; Jewelry 
BS, Philadelphia College of Art 

Work represented in collection of 
New York State Univ. at Fredonia, N.Y.; 
invited exhibitor Tuscarora Lapidary 
Society, 1975. 
Tony Luisi 

Lecturer; Photography and Film 
Musician, Composer, Filmmaker 

Owner and engineer, recording 
studio. Leader of modern jazz trio per- 
forming on Prestige Records; lecturer, 
LaSalle College, Philadelphia College 
of Textiles on audiovisual electronics; 
audiovisual consultant, Philadelphia 
Electric Company. 
Sherry Lyons 

Lecturer: Art Therapy 

Art Therapist 

BA, University of Pennsylvania 

MS, Hahnemann Medical College 

Senior Clinical Instructor, Hahne- 
mann Medical College; art therapist, 
Ashbourne Day School, 1967-72; 
lecturer and author on art therapy with 
children. 
Benjamin Martin 

Lecturer; Environmental Design 
BA, Trinity College 
M.Arch., University of Pennsylvania 
Publication; editor and author of 
Combined Center — Day Development/ 
Vocational Development Handbook I; 
HEW grant "Design for the Disabled," 
corporate member, Phila. chapter AIA; 
chairman. Committee on Architecture, 
Phila. Art Alliance; member Urban Land 
Institute and National Trust for Historic 
Preservation in the US; member. The 
Carpenters' Company of Philadelphia. 
John Martin 

Lecturer; Illustration 

Illustrator, Painter 

BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 



Illustrator, book and magazine 
covers; exhibited in Annual Society of 
Illustrators Show 1972, 1974, 1975; Art 
Directors' Show, Philadelphia, 1970. 

Arlene Matzkin 

Lecturer; Foundation Program 

Architect 

B.Arch., Cornell University 

Involved in community design, neigh- 
borhood self-help projects; member of 
"Women in the Design of the 
Environment." 

Noel Mayo 
Adjunct Professor; Industrial Design 
Chairperson; Industrial Design 
BS, Philadelphia College of Art 

President, Noel Mayo Associates; 
executive committee of Interior Design 
Council; president. Greater Philadelphia 
Development Corp.; Community Con- 
cern #13 Board; Alco Award, 1969; 
PCA Alumni Award, 1973; has lectured 
at Cornell Univ., Md. Inst., College of 
Art; co-produced multi-media presen- 
tation "Five Plus — Blacks in Science 
and Technology" for Franklin Institute. 

Reba Mayo 

Lecturer; Industrial and Environmental 
Design 

Graphic and Interior Designer 
BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 
President, Reba Mayo Design; 
member of Board of Directors, Media- 
America; member. Community Concern 
#13; member. Interior Design Council; 
Guest Lecturer, Moore College of Art; 
Exhibitions; Delaware, West Germany; 
Co-producer, "Five Plus — Blacks in 
Science and Technology," a multi- 
media presentation; Graphic and 
interior designer, Health-Infirmary 
Center at Cheyney State College. 

Robert F. McGovern 

Professor; Foundation Program 
Co-Chairperson; Foundation Program 
Painter, Designer 

Works in numerous private and 
public collections; one-man exhibitions 
in Philadelphia, New York and Chicago; 
paintings and sculptures included in 
Doylesford Abbey, Pa,; Mecton Garden 
Development, Philadelphia; Our Lady of 
Fatima, New Castle, Del.; working on 
wood carving of Bishop Neumann. 
James McMullan 

Visiting Adjunct Professor; Illustration 
Illustrator. Designer 
BFA, Pratt Institute 

Illustrator and designer of magazines, 
book jackets, record covers; director of 
the American Institute of Graphic Arts; 
awards; American Institute of Graphic 
Arts; Society of Illustrators; Advertising 
Club of New York. 
Ray K. Metzker 
Associate Professor; Photography 

105 



Photographer 

BA, Beloit College 

MS, Illinois Institute of Technology 

Guggenheim Fellow, 1966; NEA Fel- 
low, 1974; Visiting Associate Professor, 
U. of New Mexico, 1970-72; Visiting 
Adjunct Professor, Rhode Island School 
of Design, Spring 1977; permanent 
collections: Philadelphia Museum of 
Art; Museum of Modern Art; Smith- 
sonian Institution; The Metropolitan; Art 
institute of Chicago; Museum of Fine 
Arts, Boston; George Eastman House; 
Bibliotheque Nationale, Paris; pub- 
lished Persistence ol Vision, Looking at 
Photographs. Time-Life Photography 
Series; Photographers' Choice; Camera: 
Aperture. 
Braulio Munoz 

Lecturer: Liberal Arts 
BA, University of Rhode Island 
MA, University of Pennsylvania 
Edith Neff 

Lecturer; Anatomical Drawing 

Painter 

BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 

Work in the collections of: Phila. 
Museum of Art, Penna. Academy of the 
Fine Arts, Minnesota Museum of Art, 
Washington & Jefferson College; mural 
commission; Univ. City Science Center; 
article in American Artist, 1974; recent 
exhibitions: Pennsylvania Academy of 
Fine Arts' Peale House Galleries; 
Aldrich Museum, Ridgefield, Conn. 
Gerald Nichols 

Associate Professor: Painting and 

Drawing 

Co-Chairperson: Painting and Drawing 

Department 

Artist, Pertormer 

BFA, Cleveland Institute of Art 

MFA, University of Pennsylvania 

Post-Graduate Fellow, University of 

Pennsylvania 

Guggenheim Fellowship, 1971; 
artistic advisor, Philadelphia Company 
Bricolage Theater, performer, director, 
writer; recent exhibitions: Institute of 
Contemporary Art; Sculpture Outdoors. 
Temple University Ambler Campus; 
Foundation for Today's Art, Philadel- 
phia; Philadelphia College of Textiles 
and Science; Rutgers University, 
Camden; Penn State; represented in 
The Cleveland Museum of Art; Phila- 
delphia Museum of Art. 
William Norton 

Lecturer; Political Science 

AB, Lincoln University 

MA, University of Pennsylvania 

Previously taught at Rutgers and 
Harvard Universities; 1974 Canadian 
Government Prize for best comparative 
government course on Canada. 



Edward O'Brien 
Lecturer: Printmaking 
Painter, Printmaker 
BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 

Print and drawing exhibitions: 1975 
Dublin National; East Art II, Davidson 
National; 1976 National Park Service, 
Philadelphia; American Drawings '76, 
Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhi- 
bition; Drawing 1977 Rutgers National; 
collections: Quaker Storage; National 
Gallery. 

Gulbun O'Connor 
Lecturer: Cultural Anthropology 
BA, MA. Bryn Mawr College 
PhD, University of Pennsylvania 

1960-63 work with Philadelphia 
Gypsies; 1965-1966 work on Guadal- 
canal in Western Pacific. 

Frederick Osborne 

Special Lecturer: Education 

Sculptor 

BFA, Tyler School of Fine Art 

MFA, Yale University 

Exhibitions at Temple University, 
Yale University, Pennsylvania Academy 
of Fine Arts, Haverford College, Smith 
College and the Philadelphia Civic 
Center. 

Barbara Paone 

Lecturer: Illustration 

Graphic Designer, Illustrator, Printmaker 

BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 

Graphic design professor, Princeton 
University; two awards of excellence, 
1977 Philadelphia Art Directors' Show; 
Silver Medal, Neographics '77; past art 
director, N. W. Ayer; Benton and Bowles 
London; clients have included WCAU- 
TV,SK&F Labs; LIppincott Publishing Co. 

Paul W. Partridge, Jr. 
Professor: Literature 
BA, University of Florida 
PhD, University of Pennsylvania 

Albert Pastore 

Lecturer: Illustration 
Free-lance Illustrator 

Member and exhibitor. Society of 
Illustrators, N.Y.; recent exhibitions: 
Philadelphia Art Directors' Club; Award 
of Excellence, 1976; Artists Guild of 
Delaware Valley, Gold, Silver, Bronze 
Awards, 1975-76-77; "The Beautiful 
Object," PCA, 1976; "Climb Into Fan- 
tasy," Rosenfeld Gallery, Phila., 1976; 
"Regional Illustration Exhibition," Phila. 
Art Alliance, 1976; group & solo exhibi- 
tions in U.S.A. and Europe. 

Ruth Pertmutter 

Lecturer: Introduction to Film 
BA, New York University 
MA, PhD, University of Pennsylvania 
Co-Director, Film Center, Walnut St. 
Theatre; Publications: "Dada/Surrealist 
Films," Dada/ Surrealism, 1973; "Add 
Film to Rhetoric," Literature/ Film, 

106 



Spring, 1976; "Godard and Eisenstein," 
Jump Cut, Summer, 1975; "Cecil B. 
DeMille: Impressario of Seduction," 
Film Comment, January, 1976; Malcolm 
Lowry's Unpublished Filmscriptof 
"Tender Is the Night," American 
Quarterly, September, 1976. 
Jane Piper 

Lecturer: Painting, Drawing 

Painter 

Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts 

Hans Hoffman Art School 

Recent exhibitions: McCleaf Gallery, 
Phila., 1974, Peale House, 1975. 
Thomas Porett 

Assistant Professor: Photography, Film 

BS, University of Wisconsin 

MS, Illinois Institute of Technology 

Guggenheim grant, produced multi- 
media work titled "Cycles;" UICA 
Faculty Grant; two commissions for 
Phila. Museum of Art: 9-screen image 
matrix for "City/2" exhibition, 1971; 
multimedia piece on 18th century 
period rooms, 1975; cover photography 
for Time Life Photography Series, 
Frontiers ot Photography. 
Robert Prall 

Lecturer: Art Therapy 

Psychiatrist 

BS, University of Virginia 

M.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Director, Children's Unit, Eastern 
Penna. Psychiatric Institute; Supervisor 
of Child Analysis, Philadelphia Psycho- 
analytic Institute. 
Boris Putterman 
Associate Professor: Painting, 
Foundation Program 
Painter 

Diploma, Cooper Union 
BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 
MFA, Indiana University 

Exhibitions: PCA "Observances," 
1973 and various shows in Philadelphia; 
visiting lecturer, Phila. Community 
College; has taught at Indiana Univ., 
John Herron Art School, Cleveland 
Institute of Art; 1-man show, Moravian 
College, 1975; "Gallery Space 1976," 
Exhibition, Philadelphia YM/YWHA. 
Robin Quigley 

Special Lecturer: Crafts 

Jeweler, Designer 

BFA, Tyler School of Art 

MFA, Rhode Island School of Design 

Exhibitions: Helen Drutt Gallery, 
Philadelphia; Fairtree Gallery, New 
York; commercial jeweler, Abercaugh 
and Son, Philadelphia; Ronald 
McNeish, Pittsburgh. 
Richard H. Reinhardt 
Professor: Crafts 
Designer/ Crattsman 
BA (Ed.), Philadelphia College of Art 



Exhibitions: Metropolitan Museum of 
Art, NY; Phila, Museum of Art, Phila. 
Art Alliance, and various university and 
college galleries throughout the US; 
work represented in numerous com- 
mercial, religious, and private collec- 
tions; past president, Industrial Design 
Educators Assoc; guest professor. 
Industrial Design Institute, Tokyo; 
member American Assoc, for Higher 
Education, National Trust for Historic 
Preservation. 

Lanie Robertson 
Assistant Professor: Literature 
Actor, Playwright 

Certificate, University of London, 1968 
PhD, Temple University, 1974 

Member of Dramatists Guild, Inc.; 
The Philadelphia Co.; Theater Center 
Philadelphia; eleven productions of 
plays in Philadelphia. 

Warren Rohrer 
Assistant Professor: Painting 
Painter 

BA, Eastern Mennonite College 
BS, Madison College 

One-man shows: Makler Gallery, 
Marian Locks Gallery, Phila., Lamagna 
Gallery, NY; 76 collections: Phila. 
Museum of Art, Delaware Art Museum, 
Penna. Academy of the Fine Arts; 
selected exhibitions: "Pittsburgh Inter- 
national," Carnegie Institute of Fine 
Arts, Corcoran Gallery, Penna. Acad- 
emy of the Fine Arts, "Sense of Place," 
Joslyn Art Museum, Nebraska; "Made 
in Philadelphia, 11" Institute of Con- 
temporary Art. 

Peter Rose 
Assistant Professor: Film 
Filmmaker 

BA, City College of New York 
MA, San Francisco State College 

Films shown at the Whitney Museum, 
Walnut Street Theatre, various national 
film festivals and several galleries; 
commissioned to construct optical mo- 
biles for several spaces in Phila. and 
New York; exhibited at the Works and 
Marian Locks galleries; designed a 
solid-state optical printer for research 
into film and visual perception; former 
dancer and mathematician. 

Michael Rossman 
Associate Professor: Foundation 
Program 

Co-Chairperson: Foundation Program 
Painter, Designer 
BID, MFA, Pratt Institute 

Associated with Gross-McCleaf 
Gallery, Philadelphia; previously em- 
ployed as an industrial designer with 
George Mulhauser Co., General Elec- 
tric Computer Dept., and as senior 
designer. Creative Playthings, 
Summer Seminar, 1966. 



William Russell 
Lecturer: Education 
Painter, Printmaker 
BS, Kent State University 
MFA, Miami University 

Adjunct Painting Instructor, Wright 
State University, 1973-76; exhibitions: 
Miami University; Dayton Art Institute; 
Evansville, Indiana Museum. 

Karen Baler 
Assistant Professor: Education 
BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 
MFA, Maryland Institute College of Art 

Formerly employed: Philadelphia 
Board of Education, Philadelphia 
School Art League; Prix De Rome Paint- 
ing Grant, Rome, Italy; Rome Prize Re- 
newal Grant; Fellow, American Acad- 
emy in Rome; Artists Equity; Women's 
Regional Drawing Exhibition, Beaver 
College; Invitational Painting Show, 
Rosemont College; Bicentennial Paint- 
ing Exhibition, Art Alliance. 

Christopher Sanderson 
Lecturer: Sculpture 

Peter Schaumann 
Lecturer: Illustration 
Illustrator, Painter 
BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 

Illustrations for books, magazines, 
record jackets; awards: Society of 
Illustrators, 1969; New Society of 
Publications. 

Joseph Schiavo 
Lecturer: Sculpture 

Benjamin Scott 

Lecturer: Afro-American History and 

Culture 

BS, Cheney State College 

Temple University 

On staff for development of Get-Set 
and Head-Start Programs for Phila. 
Board of Education. 

Charles Searles 

Lecturer: Foundation Program 

Painter 

Diploma, Pennsylvania Academy of 

the Fine Arts 

Exhibition: "Directions in Afro- 
American Art," Johnson Museum, Cor- 
nell Univ., 1974; Howard Univ. Award 
1975; recognition for the development 
of Pan-African visual art expression; 
mural commission for US government, 
1975; one-man show Kentucky State 
Univ., 1975. 

Harry Soviak 

Professor: Painting 

Painter 

MFA, Cranbrook Academy of Art 

Represented by Marian Locks Gal- 
lery, Phila.; formerly associated with 
Richard Feigen Galleries, NY, Chi- 
cago, Los Angeles, and Gertrude Kasle 
Gallery, Detroit; exhibitions: Museum 
of Modern Art, Whitney Museum, San 
Francisco Museum of Art, Phila. Mu- 



seum of Art; article in Arts International, 
1970; Buenos Aires Convention Grant, 
studied in the West Indies; in the per- 
manent collections of Phila. Museum 
of Art, Finch College Museum, New 
York Univ. 

Raymond Spiller 
Assistant Professor: Painting, 
Foundation Program 
Painter, Conservator, Appraiser 
(Fine Arts) 

Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts 
Dayton Art Institute 

Specialist in murals; 16 one-man 
exhibitions; represented in numerous 
private and public collections; appraiser 
of fine arts for public and private col- 
lections; conservator of paintings, 
panels, documents, etc. for public and 
private collections; identification for 
all works pertaining to the major and 
minor arts. 

Doris Staffel 
Associate Professor: Painting 
BFA, BS, Tyler School of Art 
MA, University of Iowa 

Exhibited: Rome Gallery, Temple 
Univ. Abroad Gallery, Rome; Chatham 
College, Pittsburgh; McCleaf Gallery, 
Phila.; Bryn Mawr College; numerous 
private and public collections; lectured 
at: Phila. Museum of Art, Wilmington 
Museum, Moore College, Overseas 
School in Rome, Univ. of Penna., Logan 
Library, Penn State Univ.; workshop in 
oriental painting and iconography, 
Naropa Inst., Colorado, East-West 
Institute, Buddhist Art. 

Richard Stange 

Lecturer: Environmental Design 
Environmental Designer 
B.Arch, Pratt Institute 

Partner, Alley Friends, Architects; 
Artpark, artist/architect in residence; 
environmental reviews for Inside Phila- 
delphia; exhibit design 1975 conference 
of World Future Society; "Portable 
World," Museum of Contemporary 
Crafts. 

Ward Stanley 

Associate Professor: Art History 

BA, University of Hawaii 

MA, University of Pennsylvania 

Donald Stapleton 
Lecturer: Education 

Thomas R. Stearns 

Associate Professor: Sculpture and 
Painting 

Sculptor, Painter 
Memphis Academy of Art 
Cranbrook Academy of Art 
Academia de Belli Arti, Venice 

Recipient: John Simon Guggenheim 
Fellowship; National Institute of Arts 
and Letters Grant; Fulbright Fellowship; 
Artists and Writers Revolving Grant. 

107 



Gallery Affiliation: Willard Gallery, New 
York, 1964-76; exhibited: Venice Bien- 
nale; Brussels International; Park- 
Bernet Gallery; Seattle's World's Fair; 
Smithsonian Institution; Minnesota Mu- 
seum; Detroit Institute of Arts; Willard 
Gallery; listed in Who's Who in Ameri- 
can Art. 

Robert Stein 
Associate Professor: Illustration 
Co-Chairperson: illustration 
Department 
Painter, Designer 

BFA, Massachusetts College of Art 
MFA, Tyler School of Art 

Exhibited: Gallery 252, Phila. Art 
Alliance, Univ. of Delaware, Moravian 
College, Wm. Penn Memorial Museum, 
Washington & Jefferson College, Phila. 
Civic Center; staff designer KYW-TV; 
freelance design and consultant, 
Chilton Publishing; panel member 
NAEA Eastern Arts Conference; collec- 
tions: Westinghouse Corp., RCA, First 
Penna. Bank, Wm. Penn Memorial 
Museum. 

Judy Steinhauser 

Lecturer: Photography 
Photographer 
BS, SUNY at Buffalo 
MS, Illinois Institute of Technology 
National Endowment for the Arts 
Fellowship Grant, 1973; exhibitions: 
Photographers' Gallery, London; Ohio 
State University; Arizona State Univer- 
sity; University of Florida. 

Richard Stetser 

Professor: Sculpture 

BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 

Work represented in numerous pri- 
vate and public collections; sculpture 
executed for Adath Zion Congregation. 
Phila., Whitman Park, Phila., Thompson, 
Ramo, Woodridge Corp., Redevelop- 
ment Authority of Phila. 

Patricia Stewart 
Lecturer: Liberal Arts 
BA, University of Pennsylvania 

Curator, Museum of Contemporary 
Art, Chicago, 1971-74; lecturer, Art 
Education Department, Whitney 
Museum, N.Y., 1971. 

Elsa Tarantal 
Lecturer: Foundation Program 
Sculptor 

BFA, Cooper Union 
St. John's University 
Temple University 

Recent exhibitions: Phila. Art Alli- 
ance, Cheltenham Art Center, Gallery 
252. 

Stephen Tarantal 

Associate Professor: Illustration 
Co-Chairperson: Illustration Department 
Painter, 3-Dimensional Shaped 
Canvases 



BFA, Cooper Union 
MFA, Tyler School of Art 

UICA Research and Development 
Grant, 1975, "Shaped Canvas Bearing 
Walls," a synthesis of painting, sculp- 
ture and architecture; work included in 
Graphis Annual, 1974-5; PCA "Ob- 
servances II," 1973; work in the collec- 
tion of Guggenheim Museum, American 
Telephone and Telegraph Co.; Fulbright 
Grant in Painting to India, 1969; Gold 
Medal, New York Society of Illustrators, 
1971. 

Fabian Ulitsky 

Professor: Psychology 

Clinical Psychologist 

BA, M.Ed, Temple University 

Group Process and Group Therapy 
Consultant, Department of Mental 
Health Sciences, Hahnemann Medical 
College and Hospital; involved with 
teaching supervising and training grad- 
uate students in psychology, creative 
arts, psychiatric residents and clinical 
staff in group process and psycho- 
therapy. 

Petras Vaskys 
Associate Professor: Ceramics 
Ceramics Coordinator 
Poller, Sculptor, Industrial Designer 
Academy of Fine Arts, Kaunas, 
Lithuania 
Diploma, Academy of Fine Arts, Rome 

Susan T. Viguers 

Lecturer: Language and Literature 

AB, Bryn Mawr College 

MA, University of North Carolina at 

Chapel Hill 

PhD, Bryn Mawr College 

Katharine E. McBride Fellow, 
1971-72; Whiting Foundation Fellow, 
1974-75; member. Modern Language 
Association and The Shakespeare 
Association of America; Renaissance 
Drama Consultant, Theatre Wagon, Va.; 
paper on Renaissance aesthetics, Ohio 
Conference on Medieval and Renais- 
sance Studies, 1976; formerly, 
instructor, Bryn Mawr College; currently 
lecturer, Chestnut Hill College. 

Lee Voipe 
Lecturer: Industrial Design 

Caroline Von Kleeck-Beard 
Special Lecturer: Fibers 
Weaver 

BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 
MA, University of California, Berkeley 

Selected exhibitions: Colorado State 
University, 17th Annual National Art 
Round-Up, Las Vegas Art Museum; 
California State University, Pasadena 
City College; one-woman show, 
Holy Names College, Oakland. 

Ronald Walker 
Assistant Professor: Photography & 
Film 



1( 



Photographer 
BA, University of the South 
MFA, Maryland Institute, College of Art 
Sewanee Review Award for creative 
writing, 1968; Phi Beta Kappa; Co- 
ordinator, "Visual Interface" photo- 
graphic symposium/show, Phila., 1974; 
"Recent Work," one-man show at 
The Photography Place, Stratford, Pa. 

William Webster 
Associate Professor: Philosophy 
BM, Curtis Institute of Music 
BA, University of Iowa 
PhD, University of Pennsylvania 

Caria Weinberg 

Lecturer: French and Italian 
Doctorate in Foreign Languages and 
Literature, University of Pisa 

Fulbright grantee; exchange lecturer 
in Italian, Lake Erie College; member 
of Alliance Francaise de Philadelphia. 

Burton Weiss 

Lecturer: Life Sciences, Physical 

Science 

PhD, Princeton University 

Interests and research primarily in 
the areas of physiological and com- 
parative psychology. 

Julian Winston 

Assistant Professor: Industrial Design 
Educa tor/ Designer/ Musician 
BID, Pratt Institute 

IDSA Associate Member, member 
Phila. Designers Group, Human Factors 
Society, American Federation of Musi- 
cians; World's Champion Banjo Player, 
4 consecutive years (Union Grove, NC). 

Bonnie Woitek 

Lecturer: Environmental Design 

LllyYeh 
Associate Professor: Art History 
Painter, Art Historian 
BA, National Taiwan University 
MFA, University of Pennsylvania 

Recent exhibitions: University City 
Arts League, 1975, Vick Gallery, 1975, 
Marian Locks Gallery, 1977; lectures at 
Kimberton Farm School on Chinese 
Painting, 1975 and Rutgers Univ. on 
Indian Mythology, 1975. 

Nancy Young-Markowich 
Lecturer: Art Therapy 
Psychiatric Art Therapist 
BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 
MS, Art Therapy, Hahnemann 
Medical College and Hospital 

Faculty Instructor, Hahnemann Art 
Therapy Department; Senior Social 
Worker, Marconi Senior Citizens' Center. 

Christine Zelinsky 

Lecturer: Graphic Design 

Martha Zelt 

Lecturer: Printmaking 

Printmaker 

Diploma, Pennsylvania Academy of the 

Fine Arts 



BA, Temple University 

One-woman shows, Phila. Print Club; 
Emory and Henry College; printmaker- 
in-residence for Virginia Museum. 
Barbara Zucker 
Lecturer: Sculpture 



This catalogue is not a contractual 
document. The Philadelphia College of 
Art reserves the right to change any 
curricular offering, policy governing 
students, or financial regulations 
stated herein whenever and as the 
requirements of the College demand, 



Design: Bradley Gast 

Design Assistance: Joseph Rapone, 
Andrew Brown, Claire Hess, Seniors, 
Graphic Design Department 

Photography: Gene Mopsik, Bill Blanco 

Additional Photography: Ron Walker 
(p. 1, 40), Jack Simons (p. 2), 
David Hampel (p. 4, 5), Rob Wright 
(p. 5, 37), Joan Ruggles (p. 6, 7, 39), 
Eugene Mopsik (p. 7 ,36, 37). 

Editors: Mackarness Goode and 
Kay Ransdell 

Printing: Independence Press 

Typesetting: Leon Segal Typesetting 

Copyright 1977 

Philadelphia College of Art 



Information 



Concerning the following: 

Admissions to day college under- 
graduate, special student, MA in 
Art Education, teacher certification. 
Evening Division, Saturday School, 
and Pre-College Program 

Tours of the college and group 
information sessions 

Financial aid, housing, readmission, 
return-degree candidacy, PAFA and 
UICA Mobility programs, extracurricular 
activities, student organizations, 
college regulations, counseling 

Registration, scheduling, recording, 
transcripts, veterans 



Admissions Office 



Admissions Office 



Office of the Dean or Associate Dean 
of Students 



Registrar's Office 



Philadelphia College of Art 
Broad & Spruce Streets 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19102 
(215) 893-3100 
Admissions: (215)893-3174